Charles Wells Russell

Prominent Virginia lawyer and politician.

- Charles Wells Russell

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Reverdy Johnson

Statesman and jurist from Maryland.

Reverdy Johnson's house in Annapolis, Maryland, relocated onto the campus of St. John's College.
Mrs. Reverdy Johnson by Thomas Sully, ca. 1840, Princeton University Art Museum

While U.S. Attorney General, he was allowed to help Virginians Charles W. Russell and Alexander H.H. Stuart defend the Wheeling Suspension Bridge in his private capacity, that bridge also connecting two sections of the National Road as the first bridge crossing a major river west of the Appalachian Mountains.

Provisional Congress of the Confederate States

Congress of deputies and delegates called together from the Southern States which became the governing body of the Provisional Government of the Confederate States from February 4, 1861, to February 17, 1862.

Meeting in the Hall of Knights in The Hague during the Congress of Europe, 1948

Charles Wells Russell

2nd Confederate States Congress

The 2nd Confederate States Congress, consisting of the Confederate States Senate and the Confederate States House of Representatives, met from May 2, 1864, to March 18, 1865, during the last year of Jefferson Davis's presidency, at the Virginia State Capitol in Richmond, Virginia.

Photograph by Mathew Brady, c. 1861

16. Charles Wells Russell X

1st Confederate States Congress

The 1st Confederate States Congress, consisting of the Confederate States Senate and the Confederate States House of Representatives, met from February 18, 1862, to February 17, 1864, during the first two years of Jefferson Davis's presidency, at the Virginia State Capitol in Richmond, Virginia.

Photograph by Mathew Brady, c. 1861

16. Charles Wells Russell X

Wheeling Suspension Bridge

Suspension bridge spanning the main channel of the Ohio River at Wheeling, West Virginia.

Photo taken from Wheeling Island side, looking east toward the City of Wheeling
Frontispiece to the Wheeling & Belmont Bridge Company's printed argument delivered to the U.S. Supreme Court in the case Pennsylvania v. Wheeling and Belmont Bridge Company, 54 U.S. 518 (1850)
View from the Wheeling Suspension Bridge, 1977. Photo taken from City of Wheeling side, looking west toward Wheeling Island.
Flood of 1852 – earliest known photograph of the Wheeling Suspension Bridge
A view of the Wheeling Suspension Bridge from Wheeling Island (looking north-east). Located directly behind it is the Fort Henry Bridge.
View west from the east end of the bridge in downtown Wheeling. Note the multiple warning signs restricting access.
Looking east toward downtown Wheeling

The Wheeling Bridge Company, represented by Charles W. Russell and U.S. Attorney general Reverdy Johnson (supposedly in a private capacity, but who had denied Pennsylvania's request for his federal office's assistance) argued the bridge helped the U.S. mails (delayed during icy as well as high and low water periods) and also connected military posts.

Chester D. Hubbard

Two-term U.S. Representative from West Virginia, who previously served in the Virginia General Assembly and Virginia Secession Convention of 1861 before the American Civil War and who helped found the state of West Virginia.

After the adoption of the Virginia Constitution of 1850 led to increased representation of western Virginia in the Virginia General Assembly, Ohio County, which had previously been represented in the Virginia House of Delegates by Charles W. Russell, received two additional seats.

Charles Wells Russell, Jr.

American diplomat.

Russell was born in 1856 to prominent politician and lawyer Charles Wells Russell, Sr.

James Paull (judge)

Prominent lawyer, politician and judge in Wheeling in what became West Virginia during his lifetime.

Paull became one of the counsel to the Wheeling and Belmont Bridge Company (under experienced attorney and company shareholder Morgan Nelson as well as Charles Wells Russell) in the litigation which began in 1849 after construction of the Wheeling Suspension Bridge.

Reuben H. Walworth

American lawyer, jurist and politician.

Walworth engraved by Henry S. Sadd
Walworth in his later years

The Wheeling Bridge Company was represented by Charles W. Russell and U.S. Attorney general Reverdy Johnson (supposedly in a private capacity but who had denied Pennsylvania's request for his federal office's assistance)), among others.

Wells (name)

English surname of Norman origin, but is possibly a Welsh surname, from an old English word for Wales.

Statue of Neptune, sculpted in Aphrodisias, 2nd century, (Museo del Prado)
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Charles Wells Russell (1818–1867), Confederate politician during the American Civil War