Charlie Finley

Charles O. FinleyCharlie O. FinleyCharles FinleyCharles "Charlie O." FinleyCharles "Charlie" O. FinleyCharley Finley
Charles Oscar Finley (February 22, 1918 – February 19, 1996), nicknamed Charlie O or Charley O, was an American businessman who is best remembered for his tenure as the owner of Major League Baseball's Oakland Athletics.wikipedia
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Oakland Athletics

Oakland AAthleticsPhiladelphia Athletics
Charles Oscar Finley (February 22, 1918 – February 19, 1996), nicknamed Charlie O or Charley O, was an American businessman who is best remembered for his tenure as the owner of Major League Baseball's Oakland Athletics.
They won three consecutive World Championships between 1972 and 1974, led by players including Vida Blue, Catfish Hunter, Reggie Jackson, ace reliever Rollie Fingers, and colorful owner Charlie O. Finley.

California Golden Seals

Oakland SealsCalifornia SealsCalifornia
He is also known as a short-lived owner of the National Hockey League's California Golden Seals and the American Basketball Association's Memphis Tams.
Prior to the 1970–71 season, Charles O. Finley, the flamboyant owner of baseball's Oakland Athletics, purchased the Seals.

History of the Oakland Athletics

Kansas City AthleticsKansas City APhiladelphia Athletics
On December 19, 1960, Finley purchased a controlling interest in the Kansas City Athletics from Johnson's estate (Johnson having died in March of that year); he then bought out the minority owners a year later.
On December 19, 1960, Charles "Charlie" O. Finley (1918-1996), purchased a controlling interest in the team from Johnson's estate after losing out to Johnson six years earlier in Philadelphia.

New York Yankees

YankeesNew York HighlandersNew York Yankee
Finley quickly started to turn the franchise around, refusing to make deals with the New York Yankees (for which the Athletics had been criticized) and searching for unheralded talent.
In 1960, Charles O. Finley purchased the Athletics and put an end to the trades.

Charlie-O

Charlie O, the Mulemule
"Charlie-O" was paraded about the outfield, into cocktail parties and hotel lobbies and into the press room after a large feeding to annoy reporters.
The mule was named after Charles O. Finley, the team's owner at the time.

La Porte, Indiana

LaPorte, IndianaLa PorteLaPorte
Finley was born in Ensley, Birmingham, Alabama, attended Ensley High School but was further raised in Gary, Indiana, and later lived in La Porte, 60 mi east of Chicago.

Ensley High School

EnsleyBirmingham (AL) Ensley
Finley was born in Ensley, Birmingham, Alabama, attended Ensley High School but was further raised in Gary, Indiana, and later lived in La Porte, 60 mi east of Chicago.

Ensley (Birmingham)

EnsleyEnsley, AlabamaEnsley, Birmingham, Alabama
Finley was born in Ensley, Birmingham, Alabama, attended Ensley High School but was further raised in Gary, Indiana, and later lived in La Porte, 60 mi east of Chicago.

Catfish Hunter

Jim "Catfish" HunterHunterCatfish
The A's (as they were officially known from ) moved to California in January 1968, just as the new talent amassed over the years in the minors (such as Reggie Jackson, Sal Bando, Joe Rudi, Bert Campaneris, Catfish Hunter, Rollie Fingers, and Vida Blue) was starting to gel.
He recovered in LaPorte, Indiana at the farm of Athletics owner Charles O. Finley.

1967 in baseball

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In 1967, he replaced the team's traditional black spikes with white.

Reggie Jackson

JacksonMr. OctoberReggie
The A's (as they were officially known from ) moved to California in January 1968, just as the new talent amassed over the years in the minors (such as Reggie Jackson, Sal Bando, Joe Rudi, Bert Campaneris, Catfish Hunter, Rollie Fingers, and Vida Blue) was starting to gel.
Slumping at the plate in May 1970, Athletics owner Charlie O. Finley threatened to send Jackson to the minors.

Municipal Stadium (Kansas City, Missouri)

Municipal StadiumKansas City Municipal StadiumMuehlebach Field
After supposedly being told by manager Ed Lopat about the Yankees' success being attributable to the dimensions of Yankee Stadium, Finley built the "K.C. Pennant Porch" in right field, which brought the right field fence in Kansas City Municipal Stadium to match Yankee Stadium's dimensions exactly, just 296 feet from home plate.
The stadium was home to many of the shenanigans of Charlie Finley, who bought the A's after Arnold Johnson's death in 1960.

1972 World Series

1972World Series1972 classic
During the early 1970s, the once-moribund A's became a powerhouse, winning three straight World Series from 1972 to 1974 and five straight division titles from 1971 to 1975, in the Oakland Coliseum.
Iconoclastic club owner Charlie Finley's "Swingin' A's" featured day-glo uniforms, white shoes, lots of facial hair, colorful nicknames, and explosive personalities, while "The Big Red Machine" was a more traditional franchise with a more traditional look (including a facial-hair ban)—and an everyday lineup with multiple future Hall of Famers as well as all-time hits king, Pete Rose.

Neil Papiano

Finley, in turn, hired famed sports attorney Neil Papiano and proceeded to file a $10 million restraint-of-trade lawsuit against Kuhn and Major League Baseball.
In the mid-1970s, Papiano was hired by Oakland Athletics owner Charlie Finley to file a restraint-of-trade lawsuit against Major League Baseball and Commissioner Bowie Kuhn.

Joe Rudi

The A's (as they were officially known from ) moved to California in January 1968, just as the new talent amassed over the years in the minors (such as Reggie Jackson, Sal Bando, Joe Rudi, Bert Campaneris, Catfish Hunter, Rollie Fingers, and Vida Blue) was starting to gel.
With baseball entering the free agency era, A's owner Charlie Finley attempted to sell Rudi and pitcher Rollie Fingers to the Boston Red Sox for $1 million each at the MLB trade deadline on June 15, 1976, rather than trading them (as he had done with Reggie Jackson and Ken Holtzman the year before) or risking losing them in free agency.

1974 World Series

1974World Series74
During the early 1970s, the once-moribund A's became a powerhouse, winning three straight World Series from 1972 to 1974 and five straight division titles from 1971 to 1975, in the Oakland Coliseum.
Hunter was threatening to file for free agency in 1975 if owner Charles O. Finley didn't come through with back pay Hunter claimed he had coming.

Rollie Fingers

Fingers
The A's (as they were officially known from ) moved to California in January 1968, just as the new talent amassed over the years in the minors (such as Reggie Jackson, Sal Bando, Joe Rudi, Bert Campaneris, Catfish Hunter, Rollie Fingers, and Vida Blue) was starting to gel.
Believing he would not be able to afford to re-sign his key players, Athletics' owner Charlie Finley attempted to sell Fingers and Joe Rudi to the Boston Red Sox for $1 million each and Vida Blue to the New York Yankees for $1.5 million in June.

Vida Blue

Blue
The A's (as they were officially known from ) moved to California in January 1968, just as the new talent amassed over the years in the minors (such as Reggie Jackson, Sal Bando, Joe Rudi, Bert Campaneris, Catfish Hunter, Rollie Fingers, and Vida Blue) was starting to gel.
After Blue's breakthrough season in 1971, he and Athletics owner Charlie Finley clashed over his salary.

1980 Oakland Athletics season

19801980 Oakland Athletics1980 Oakland A
In 1980, Charlie O. agreed in principle to sell to businessman Marvin Davis, who planned to move the Athletics to Denver.
The season also marked the end of the Charlie Finley ownership era.

Eddie Lopat

Ed Lopat
After supposedly being told by manager Ed Lopat about the Yankees' success being attributable to the dimensions of Yankee Stadium, Finley built the "K.C. Pennant Porch" in right field, which brought the right field fence in Kansas City Municipal Stadium to match Yankee Stadium's dimensions exactly, just 296 feet from home plate.
Lopat remained with the Athletics as a senior front office aide to team owner Charlie Finley until the club moved to Oakland after the season.

Arnold Johnson (industrialist)

Arnold JohnsonagreementArnold M. Johnson
Finley first attempted to buy the Philadelphia Athletics in 1954, but American League owners instead approved the sale of the team to Arnold Johnson, who moved the A's to Kansas City for the 1955 season.
Later that season, his estate sold its controlling interest in the team to Charles O. Finley, who put an end to the A's being effectively a "farm club" of the Yankees, and eventually moved the A's to Oakland and assembled a dynasty there in the early 1970s.

Bowie Kuhn

Finley attempted to sell Rudi and Fingers to the Red Sox for $1 million each and Blue to the Yankees for $1.5 million, at which Major League Baseball commissioner Bowie Kuhn decided to invoke the rarely used "best interests of baseball" clause in order to void Finley's sales.
He was a major adversary of Oakland Athletics owner Charles O. Finley.

Carl A. Finley

Charlie O. and his "right-hand man," cousin Carl A. Finley started scouting for new talent in 1977.
A career change in 1962 landed Carl with the Oakland A's when he accepted a position as minority owner of the Kansas City Athletics team after being 'romanced' into this capacity by his cousin Charlie O. Finley who bought into the team in 1960.

Monte Moore

The A's have recently held promotional days with throwback uniforms from the Finley years, and have invited former players and play-by-play announcer Monte Moore to attend.
An Oklahoma native, with a folksy, down-home style, Moore became the lead broadcaster for the Kansas City A's in, when owner Charles O. Finley inserted him to replace Merle Harmon.