Charlottesville, Virginia

CharlottesvilleCharlottesville, VACharlottesville CityCity of CharlottesvilleC-Ville WeeklyVirginiaCharlotteville CharlottesvilleCharlottesville, City ofCharlottesville, Va.
Charlottesville, colloquially known as C'ville and officially named the City of Charlottesville, is an independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia.wikipedia
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Virginia

Commonwealth of VirginiaVAState of Virginia
Charlottesville, colloquially known as C'ville and officially named the City of Charlottesville, is an independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia.
The region, known for its heavy clay soil, includes the Southwest Mountains around Charlottesville.

Richmond, Virginia

RichmondRichmond, VARichmond City
During their terms as Governor of Virginia, they lived in Charlottesville, and traveled to and from Richmond, along the 71 mi historic Three Notch'd Road. It was situated along a trade route called Three Notched Road (present day U.S. Route 250), which led from Richmond to the Great Valley.
Richmond is at the fall line of the James River, 44 mi west of Williamsburg, 66 mi east of Charlottesville, 91 mi east of Lynchburg and 92 mi south of Washington, D.C. Surrounded by Henrico and Chesterfield counties, the city is at the intersections of Interstate 95 and Interstate 64 and encircled by Interstate 295, Virginia State Route 150 and Virginia State Route 288.

University of Virginia

VirginiaUniversity of Virginia at CharlottesvilleThe University of Virginia
The University of Virginia, founded by Jefferson and one of the original Public Ivies, straddles the city's southwestern border.
The University of Virginia (U.Va. or UVA) is a public research university in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Nelson County, Virginia

Nelson CountyNelsonGladstone
Charlottesville is the heart of the Charlottesville metropolitan area, which includes Albemarle, Buckingham, Fluvanna, Greene, and Nelson counties.
Nelson County is part of the Charlottesville, VA Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Fluvanna County, Virginia

Fluvanna CountyFluvannaFluvanna Counties
Charlottesville is the heart of the Charlottesville metropolitan area, which includes Albemarle, Buckingham, Fluvanna, Greene, and Nelson counties.
Fluvanna County is part of the Charlottesville, Virginia Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Charlottesville, Virginia metropolitan area

Metropolitan Statistical AreaCharlottesville metropolitan areaCharlottesville, VA Metropolitan Statistical Area
Charlottesville is the heart of the Charlottesville metropolitan area, which includes Albemarle, Buckingham, Fluvanna, Greene, and Nelson counties.
*Charlottesville (Principal city)

Greene County, Virginia

Greene CountyGreeneGreene counties
Charlottesville is the heart of the Charlottesville metropolitan area, which includes Albemarle, Buckingham, Fluvanna, Greene, and Nelson counties.
Greene County is part of the Charlottesville, VA Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Monticello

Monticello, Virginiaestatehome
Monticello, 3 mi southeast of the city, is, along with the University of Virginia, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, attracting thousands of tourists every year.
Located just outside Charlottesville, Virginia, in the Piedmont region, the plantation was originally 5000 acre, with Jefferson using the labor of enslaved Africans for extensive cultivation of tobacco and mixed crops, later shifting from tobacco cultivation to wheat in response to changing markets.

Buckingham County, Virginia

Buckingham CountyBuckinghamBuckingham Counties
Charlottesville is the heart of the Charlottesville metropolitan area, which includes Albemarle, Buckingham, Fluvanna, Greene, and Nelson counties.
Buckingham is part of the Charlottesville Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Orange, Virginia

OrangeOrange Court HouseOrange Court House, Virginia
Orange, located 26 mi northeast of the city, was the hometown of President James Madison.
Orange is 28 mi northeast of Charlottesville, 88 mi southwest of Washington, D.C., and 4 mi east of James Madison's plantation of Montpelier.

U.S. Route 250

US 250250U.S. Highway 250
It was situated along a trade route called Three Notched Road (present day U.S. Route 250), which led from Richmond to the Great Valley.
It goes through the cities of Richmond, Charlottesville, Staunton, and Waynesboro, Virginia; and Wheeling, West Virginia.

Jefferson School (Charlottesville, Virginia)

Jefferson High SchoolJefferson High School.Jefferson School
It was located in the Preston Building, 115 Fourth Street, N.W. James Fleming was a graduate of Jefferson High School.
The Jefferson School is a historic building in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Vinegar Hill (Charlottesville, Virginia)

Vinegar Hill
In 1965, the city government razed the downtown African American neighborhood Vinegar Hill as an urban renewal project, after the city council passing a law that "unsanitary and unsafe" properties could be taken over by a housing authority.
Vinegar Hill was one of the earliest neighborhoods in Charlottesville, Virginia.

James Monroe

MonroePresident MonroePresident James Monroe
Charlottesville was the home of two Presidents, Thomas Jefferson and James Monroe.

Lynching of John Henry James

John Henry JamesJames, John Henry
In 1898, Charlottesville resident John Henry James was lynched in the nearby town of Ivy.
John Henry James was an African-American man who was lynched near Charlottesville, Virginia on January 12, 1898, for having allegedly raped a white woman.

Battle of Rio Hill

Skirmish at Rio Hill
The only battle to take place in Charlottesville was the skirmish at Rio Hill, an encounter in which George Armstrong Custer briefly engaged local Confederate Home Guard s before retreating.
In the early afternoon of February 28, 1864, Union Brig. Gen. George A. Custer and 1,500 Union soldiers advanced towards Charlottesville.

Paramount Theater (Charlottesville, Virginia)

Paramount TheaterParamount TheatreParamount
In 1943, there were at least three theaters in Charlottesville: Paramount, Jefferson, and La Fayette.
The Paramount Theater in Charlottesville, Virginia, United States was designed by Rapp and Rapp and opened in 1931 as a movie theater.

Jefferson Theater (Virginia)

Jefferson TheaterJeffersonJefferson Theatre
In 1943, there were at least three theaters in Charlottesville: Paramount, Jefferson, and La Fayette.
The Jefferson Theater, a former movie palace, is a performing arts venue located at 110 East Main Street in Charlottesville, Virginia, and is the centerpiece of the Historic Downtown Mall.

Sarah Patton Boyle

In 1956, crosses were burned outside a progressive church and the home of white integration activist Sarah Patton Boyle.
Boyle was born near Charlottesville, Virginia, on an Albemarle County plantation which dated back to the Colonial era.

Market Street Park

Emancipation ParkLee Park
In August 2017, the city was the site of the "Unite the Right rally", organized by white supremacist groups to protest against the removal of the Robert E.Lee statue from then Lee Park, subsequently renamed Emancipation Park.
Market Street Park, known as Lee Park until 2017, and as Emancipation Park from June 2017 to July 2018, is a public park in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Three Notch'd Road

Three Chopt Road
During their terms as Governor of Virginia, they lived in Charlottesville, and traveled to and from Richmond, along the 71 mi historic Three Notch'd Road. It was situated along a trade route called Three Notched Road (present day U.S. Route 250), which led from Richmond to the Great Valley.
He sounded a warning alert at Monticello and the town of Charlottesville of secretly approaching British troops seeking to capture the Governor of Virginia and key members of the Virginia General Assembly.

Robert E. Lee Monument (Charlottesville, Virginia)

a statue of Robert E. LeeRobert Edward LeeRobert E. Lee
In August 2017, the city was the site of the "Unite the Right rally", organized by white supremacist groups to protest against the removal of the Robert E.Lee statue from then Lee Park, subsequently renamed Emancipation Park.
Commissioned in 1917 and dedicated in 1924, it is located in Charlottesville, Virginia's Market Street Park (formerly Emancipation Park, and before that Lee Park) in the Charlottesville and Albemarle County Courthouse Historic District.

Liberation and Freedom Day

In a separate vote, they unanimously created a new day of celebration called Liberation and Freedom Day, to be celebrated on March 3, the day in 1865 when Gen. Philip Sheridan's troops rolled through town and found a population that was majority African-American - and although emancipation for most of them didn’t occur on that day, it was the opening salvo for a lot of Charlottesvillians’ freedom.
In a unanimous vote, on July 1, 2019, the City Council of Charlottesville, Virginia established a new city holiday, Liberation and Freedom Day, to be celebrated on March 3.

Rivanna River

RivannaNorth Fork Rivanna RiverRivanna canal
Charlottesville is located in the center of the Commonwealth of Virginia along the Rivanna River, a tributary of the James, just west of the Southwest Mountains, itself paralleling the Blue Ridge about 20 mi to the west.
The Rivanna River is formed in Albemarle County about 4 mi northeast of Charlottesville by the confluence of two tributaries:

Monacan Indian Nation

MonacanMonacan peopleMonocan
At the time of European encounter, part of the area that became Charlottesville was occupied by a Monacan village called Monasukapanough.
Tributary to them were the Monahassanugh (later known as the Nahyssan, i.e. Tutelo), whose town was near what later developed as Wingina, and the Monasukapanough (later known as the Saponi), living near present-day Charlottesville.