Charlottetown Conference

CharlottetownCharlottetown Conference, 1864Confederation Conferenceconference
The Charlottetown Conference was held in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island for representatives from the colonies of British North America to discuss Canadian Confederation.wikipedia
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Charlottetown

Charlottetown, Prince Edward IslandCharlottetown, PEICharlottetown, PE
The Charlottetown Conference was held in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island for representatives from the colonies of British North America to discuss Canadian Confederation.
It was famously the site of the Charlottetown Conference in 1864, the first gathering of Canadian and Maritime statesmen to debate the proposed Maritime Union and the more persuasive British North American Union, now known as Canadian Confederation.

Prince Edward Island

PEPEIP.E.I.
The Charlottetown Conference was held in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island for representatives from the colonies of British North America to discuss Canadian Confederation. The conference had been planned as a meeting of representatives from the Maritime colonies: Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.
The island has several informal names: "Garden of the Gulf", referring to the pastoral scenery and lush agricultural lands throughout the province; and "Birthplace of Confederation" or "Cradle of Confederation", referring to the Charlottetown Conference in 1864, although PEI did not join Confederation until 1873, when it became the seventh Canadian province.

The Maritimes

MaritimesMaritime ProvincesCanadian Maritimes
The conference had been planned as a meeting of representatives from the Maritime colonies: Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.
The notion of a Maritime Union has been proposed at various times in Canada's history; the first discussions in 1864 at the Charlottetown Conference contributed to Canadian Confederation which instead formed the larger Dominion of Canada.

New Brunswick

NBProvince of New BrunswickNew Brunswick, Canada
The conference had been planned as a meeting of representatives from the Maritime colonies: Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.
The 1864 Charlottetown Conference was intended to discuss a Maritime Union, but concerns over possible conquest by the Americans, coupled with a belief that Britain was unwilling to defend its colonies against American attack, led to a request from the Province of Canada (now Ontario and Quebec) to expand the meeting's scope.

Maritime Union

a unionAtlantic provincial unionismAtlantic Union
Britain encouraged a Maritime Union between these colonies, hoping that they would then become less economically and politically dependent on the Crown, and provide for greater economic and military power for the region in light of the American Civil War.
The concept of a political union was formally discussed at the Charlottetown Conference in 1864 when Newfoundland, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island were individual colonies in British North America, but that meeting resulted in Confederation of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and the Province of Canada, not just of the Maritime colonies or Newfoundland.

Canadian Confederation

ConfederationConfederation of CanadaFather of Confederation
The Charlottetown Conference was held in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island for representatives from the colonies of British North America to discuss Canadian Confederation.
The Charlottetown Conference began on September 1, 1864.

Province House (Prince Edward Island)

Province HousePrince Edward Island Legislative BuildingProvince House National Historic Site
The majority of the conference took place at the colony's legislative building, Province House, although some social functions were held at Government House, the home of the colony's Lieutenant Governor.
From September 1–7, 1864, Province House had an important role in helping Prince Edward Island host the Charlottetown Conference which resulted in Canadian Confederation.

Quebec Conference, 1864

Quebec ConferenceQuebec Conference of 18641864 Quebec Conference
The conference concluded on Wednesday September 7, but the representatives agreed to meet again the next month in Quebec City (see Quebec Conference).
Therefore, the overall goal of the conference was to elaborate on policies surrounding federalism and creating a single state, both of which had been discussed at the Charlottetown Conference around a month earlier.

Quebec

QuébecProvince of QuebecQC
However, another colony, the Province of Canada, comprising present-day Ontario and Québec, heard news of the planned conference and asked that the agenda be expanded to discuss a union that would also include them.
The first Charlottetown Conference took place in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, followed by the Quebec Conference in Quebec City which led to a delegation going to London, England, to put forth a proposal for a national union.

Charles Tupper

Sir Charles TupperTupperSir Charles Tupper, 1st Baronet
However, representatives of the Province of Canada asked to be allowed to attend the meeting in Charlottetown scheduled to discuss Maritime Union in order to present a proposal for a wider union, and the Charlottetown Conference thus became the first of the three conferences that secured Canadian Confederation.

William Henry Pope (Canadian politician)

William Henry PopeWilliamWilliam H. Pope
There was no one working at the public wharf at the foot of Great George Street when the Canadian delegates arrived on the steamship SS Victoria, so Prince Edward Island representative William Henry Pope had to handle receptions by himself, including rowing out to greet the new arrivals.
During the Charlottetown Conference, the Popes billetted George Brown and hosted a luncheon for delegates at Ardgowan.

Samuel Leonard Tilley

Sir Samuel Leonard TilleySamuel L. TilleySamuel Tilley
He attended each of the Charlottetown, London, and Quebec City Conferences as a supporter of Canadian Confederation.

William Steeves

William H. SteevesWilliam Henry SteevesHon. William Henry Steeves House Museum
Steeves was a supporter of Confederation and was one of New Brunswick's delegates to the Charlottetown Conference and the Quebec Conference of 1864.

Edward Palmer (Canadian politician)

Edward Palmer
He is considered one of the Fathers of Canadian Confederation, despite his opposition to Confederation, as he was a delegate to both the Charlottetown and Québec Conferences.

John Hamilton Gray (New Brunswick politician)

John Hamilton GrayJohn H. Gray
Gray served as a delegate to the Charlottetown Conference only to return to New Brunswick to face growing hostility to the confederation project and lost his seat in the 1865 election that brought the Anti-Confederation Party to power.

George-Étienne Cartier

Sir George-Étienne CartierCartierCartier of Montreal
He attended all three of the conferences convened for this purpose: Charlottetown, Quebec, and London.

John Mercer Johnson

John M. JohnsonJ. M. JohnsonJohn M. Johnson, Jr.
At the Charlottetown Conference and the two later conferences discussing the confederation, Johnson vigorously asserted that the provincial governments should not hold any power above the course of the county or zone.

John A. Macdonald

Sir John A. MacdonaldJohn Alexander MacdonaldMacdonald
The Canadians obtained permission to send a delegation—led by Macdonald, Cartier, and Brown—to what became known as the Charlottetown Conference.

Hewitt Bernard

Hewitt Bernard was the recording secretary at the conference, at the request of John A. Macdonald.
He soon became chief clerk, and he was the recording secretary at the Charlottetown Conference in 1864.

Thomas D'Arcy McGee

D'Arcy McGeeThomas D’Arcy McGeeD'Arcy McGee, Thomas
He retained that office in the "Great Coalition", and was a Canadian delegate to the Charlottetown and Quebec conferences of 1864.

John Hamilton Gray (Prince Edward Island politician)

John Hamilton GrayCol. John Hamilton GrayColonel John Hamilton Gray
Gray was chairman of the 1864 Charlottetown Conference, which laid the groundwork for the British North America Act of 1867.

British North America

BritishNorth AmericaBritish North American
The Charlottetown Conference was held in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island for representatives from the colonies of British North America to discuss Canadian Confederation.

Nova Scotia

NSNova Scotia, CanadaNova Scotian
The conference had been planned as a meeting of representatives from the Maritime colonies: Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.

Newfoundland Colony

NewfoundlandColony of Newfoundlandcolony
Newfoundland agreed with the movement, but was not notified in time to take part in the proceedings.