Chase Aircraft

Chase
The Chase Aircraft Company, founded in 1943, was an aircraft manufacturer of the United States of America, primarily constructing gliders and military transport aircraft.wikipedia
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Stroukoff Aircraft

Stroukoff
A successor company, Stroukoff Aircraft, continued experimental work for several years before closing in 1959.
Successor to Chase Aircraft, the company specialised in developing advanced variants of the C-123 Provider; however, none of the company's designs attracted a production order, and the company folded in 1959.

Michael Stroukoff

Founded in New York, New York in 1943 with Michael Stroukoff, a Russian émigré, as president and chief designer, Chase's first aircraft design was the XCG-14 assault glider, produced for the U.S. Army Air Forces and first flying in January 1945.
After spending some time as an architect, he joined the Chase Aircraft Company and designed a number of transport aircraft for the United States Army Air Forces and the United States Air Force, later starting his own company to perform further aeronautical work.

Chase YCG-14

CG-14XCG-14G-14
Founded in New York, New York in 1943 with Michael Stroukoff, a Russian émigré, as president and chief designer, Chase's first aircraft design was the XCG-14 assault glider, produced for the U.S. Army Air Forces and first flying in January 1945.
The Chase CG-14, also known as the G-14 or Model MS.1, was an assault glider manufactured by Chase Aircraft for the United States Army Air Forces during the Second World War.

Fairchild C-123 Provider

C-123C-123 ProviderFairchild C-123K Provider
Plans to produce the C-123 transport for the United States Air Force collapsed amid scandal, and the company closed in 1953.
The Fairchild C-123 Provider is an American military transport aircraft designed by Chase Aircraft and then built by Fairchild Aircraft for the U.S. Air Force.

Chase XCG-20

XG-20CG-20XCG-20
Meanwhile, a third, still larger, assault glider had been designed by Stroukoff, the XG-20, the largest glider ever built in the United States and also the last combat glider to be constructed for the U.S. military.
The Chase XCG-20, also known as the XG-20 and by the company designation MS-8 Avitruc, was a large assault glider developed immediately after World War II by the Chase Aircraft Company for the United States Air Force, and was the largest glider ever built in the United States.

Chase XC-123A

XC-123A
The second prototype XG-20, following public display in early 1950 at Pope AFB during Exercise Swarmer, was taken aside for a more radical transformation, being fitted with two twin bomber engine pods containing J47 turbojets, and flying in early 1951 as the XC-123A, the United States' first jet-powered transport aircraft.
The Chase XC-123A was an experimental transport aircraft developed by Chase Aircraft.

Fairchild C-119 Flying Boxcar

C-119Fairchild C-119G Flying BoxcarC-119 Flying Boxcar
Kaiser had been awarded an earlier contract as a second source for construction of Fairchild's C-119, and the aircraft produced by Kaiser were proving to be significantly more expensive than those produced by Fairchild.
No. 51-8098 to 51-8168) before converting the factory for a planned production of the Chase C-123 that never eventuated.

Chase YC-122 Avitruc

CG-18YC-122 AvitrucC-122
Development of improved, enlarged versions of the aircraft continued over the next two years, with the company moving to Trenton, New Jersey in 1946, before the XCG-14 was superseded by the XG-18, an even larger and heavier aircraft that was the world's first all-metal transport glider.
The Chase XCG-18A and YC-122 Avitruc (known internally as the Chase MS.7) was a military transport aircraft designed by Chase Aircraft and produced in limited numbers in the United States in the late 1940s, initially as a glider, but definitively in powered form.

United States

American🇺🇸U.S.
The Chase Aircraft Company, founded in 1943, was an aircraft manufacturer of the United States of America, primarily constructing gliders and military transport aircraft.

Military glider

glidergliderstransport glider
Founded in New York, New York in 1943 with Michael Stroukoff, a Russian émigré, as president and chief designer, Chase's first aircraft design was the XCG-14 assault glider, produced for the U.S. Army Air Forces and first flying in January 1945. The Chase Aircraft Company, founded in 1943, was an aircraft manufacturer of the United States of America, primarily constructing gliders and military transport aircraft.

Military transport aircraft

transport aircrafttransporttransport helicopter
The Chase Aircraft Company, founded in 1943, was an aircraft manufacturer of the United States of America, primarily constructing gliders and military transport aircraft.

Henry J. Kaiser

Henry KaiserKaiserHenry J. Kaiser Co.
Lacking space for expansion, the company was purchased by Henry J. Kaiser in 1951.

United States Air Force

Air ForceU.S. Air ForceUSAF
Plans to produce the C-123 transport for the United States Air Force collapsed amid scandal, and the company closed in 1953. By 1949, the United States Air Force had determined that the glider was no longer a viable weapon on the battlefield, and the XG-18 was modified, being fitted with a pair of radial engines.

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
Founded in New York, New York in 1943 with Michael Stroukoff, a Russian émigré, as president and chief designer, Chase's first aircraft design was the XCG-14 assault glider, produced for the U.S. Army Air Forces and first flying in January 1945.

Émigré

émigrésemigratedemigres
Founded in New York, New York in 1943 with Michael Stroukoff, a Russian émigré, as president and chief designer, Chase's first aircraft design was the XCG-14 assault glider, produced for the U.S. Army Air Forces and first flying in January 1945.

United States Army Air Forces

USAAFArmy Air ForcesU.S. Army Air Forces
Founded in New York, New York in 1943 with Michael Stroukoff, a Russian émigré, as president and chief designer, Chase's first aircraft design was the XCG-14 assault glider, produced for the U.S. Army Air Forces and first flying in January 1945.

Trenton, New Jersey

TrentonTrenton, NJTrenton City
Development of improved, enlarged versions of the aircraft continued over the next two years, with the company moving to Trenton, New Jersey in 1946, before the XCG-14 was superseded by the XG-18, an even larger and heavier aircraft that was the world's first all-metal transport glider.

Radial engine

radialradial enginesradial piston engine
By 1949, the United States Air Force had determined that the glider was no longer a viable weapon on the battlefield, and the XG-18 was modified, being fitted with a pair of radial engines.

Hiller X-18

X-18
One YC-122, however, would later be modified into the Hiller X-18, an experimental tiltwing VTOL aircraft.

Tiltwing

tilt-wingtilt wing
One YC-122, however, would later be modified into the Hiller X-18, an experimental tiltwing VTOL aircraft.

VTOL

vertical take-off and landingvertical takeoff and landingvertical take off and landing
One YC-122, however, would later be modified into the Hiller X-18, an experimental tiltwing VTOL aircraft.

Pope Field

Pope AFBPope Air Force BasePope Army Airfield
The second prototype XG-20, following public display in early 1950 at Pope AFB during Exercise Swarmer, was taken aside for a more radical transformation, being fitted with two twin bomber engine pods containing J47 turbojets, and flying in early 1951 as the XC-123A, the United States' first jet-powered transport aircraft.

Exercise Swarmer

The second prototype XG-20, following public display in early 1950 at Pope AFB during Exercise Swarmer, was taken aside for a more radical transformation, being fitted with two twin bomber engine pods containing J47 turbojets, and flying in early 1951 as the XC-123A, the United States' first jet-powered transport aircraft.

Bomber

bombersbombardmentbomber aircraft
The second prototype XG-20, following public display in early 1950 at Pope AFB during Exercise Swarmer, was taken aside for a more radical transformation, being fitted with two twin bomber engine pods containing J47 turbojets, and flying in early 1951 as the XC-123A, the United States' first jet-powered transport aircraft.

General Electric J47

J47General Electric J47-19General Electric J47-GE-13
The second prototype XG-20, following public display in early 1950 at Pope AFB during Exercise Swarmer, was taken aside for a more radical transformation, being fitted with two twin bomber engine pods containing J47 turbojets, and flying in early 1951 as the XC-123A, the United States' first jet-powered transport aircraft.