Check (chess)

checkcheckscheckingcheckedcheck in chesscheckmate
A check is a condition in chess, shogi, and xiangqi that occurs when a player's king (or general in xiangqi) is under threat of on their opponent's next turn.wikipedia
123 Related Articles

Chess

chess playerchess gamewestern chess
A check is a condition in chess, shogi, and xiangqi that occurs when a player's king (or general in xiangqi) is under threat of on their opponent's next turn.
When a king is under immediate attack by one or two of the opponent's pieces, it is said to be in check.

Checkmate

matecheckmatingmates
If the player cannot move out of check, the game ends in checkmate and the player loses.
Checkmate (often shortened to mate) is a game position in chess and other chess-like games in which a player's king is in check (threatened with ) and there is no way to remove the threat.

King (chess)

kingkingschess king
A check is a condition in chess, shogi, and xiangqi that occurs when a player's king (or general in xiangqi) is under threat of on their opponent's next turn.
If a player's king is threatened with capture, it is said to be in check, and the player must remove the threat of on the next move.

Shogi

shōgiJapanese chessamateur 5-dan ranked player
A check is a condition in chess, shogi, and xiangqi that occurs when a player's king (or general in xiangqi) is under threat of on their opponent's next turn.
2) Drop Pawn Mate (打ち歩詰め uchifudzume): A pawn cannot be dropped to give an immediate checkmate. (Although other pieces may be dropped to give immediate checkmate.) A pawn may, however, be dropped to give immediate check as long as it is not also mate. It is also permissible to mate a king with a pawn that is already on the board.

Double check

triple check
If a king is placed in double check, the king must get out of both checks on the following move. Double check. A double check is a check from two pieces to the opponent's king in a single move. This happens when a moved piece attacks the king, resulting in a second piece giving check by discovered check. It can also happen, though very rarely, when an en passant capture opens two lines of attack simultaneously. In algebraic chess notation, a double check move is sometimes noted with a "++" after the written move in place of the usual "+", although "++" has been used to indicate checkmate (along with "#"). A double check cannot be blocked, nor can it be met by capturing one of the checking pieces (unless the king itself makes the capture), because there is check from two directions.
In chess, a double check is a check delivered by two pieces simultaneously.

Rules of chess

chessrulesstandard chess
Under the standard rules of chess, a player may not make any move that places or leaves their king in check.
The king can be put in check but cannot be captured (see below).

Castling

castlecastledcastles
2) Moving the king to an adjacent square where it is not in check. The king is not allowed to castle when it is in check. The king may capture an enemy piece in a move to get out of check, as long as the piece is not protected.
Castling may only be done if the king has never moved, the rook involved has never moved, the squares between the king and the rook involved are unoccupied, the king is not in check, and the king does not cross over or end on a square attacked by an enemy piece.

Pin (chess)

pinpinnedpins
1) Capturing the checking piece, with either the king or another piece. If the checking piece is on a square next to the king, the king can capture the piece if the king does not move into a new check (i.e. if the piece is not protected by another enemy piece). Likewise, a piece that is pinned to the king cannot capture the checking piece if such a move would place the king in check from the pinning piece. 3) Blocking the check. This only works if the checking piece is a queen, rook, or bishop and there is at least one empty square in the line between the checking piece and the checked king. Blocking a check is done by moving a piece to one such empty square. (The blocking piece is then pinned to the king by the attacking piece.)
Any piece can be pinned except the king, since the king must be immediately removed from check under all circumstances (see Skewer (chess)#Absolute skewer).

Block (chess)

Blockinterposingblocked
A player must get out of check, if possible, by interposing a piece between the threatening piece and the king, capturing the threatening piece, or moving the king to a square where it is no longer in check.
A check on a king by an opponent's queen, rook, or bishop can sometimes be blocked by moving a piece to a square in line in between the opponent's checking piece and the checked king.

Bishop (chess)

bishopbishopschess bishop
3) Blocking the check. This only works if the checking piece is a queen, rook, or bishop and there is at least one empty square in the line between the checking piece and the checked king. Blocking a check is done by moving a piece to one such empty square. (The blocking piece is then pinned to the king by the attacking piece.)
A knight check cannot be blocked but a bishop check can.

Losing Chess

suicide chessSuicideKamikaze chess
In some variations of chess, such as Losing chess, a player can move into check.
there is no check or checkmate;

Cross-check

Cross-check. When a check is answered by a check, particularly when this second check is delivered by a piece blocking the first, it is called a cross-check. In fact, a "cross-checkmate" is also possible in that way (that is, to answer a check with a checkmate) but since no such term exists, it would be called cross-check as well. Cross-checks are rather rare in actual gameplay but are a popular theme in chess problems.
In chess, a cross-check is a tactic in which a check is played in response to a check, especially when the original check is blocked by a piece that itself either delivers check or reveals a discovered check from another piece.

Tempo (chess)

tempotempi
This is called a "useless check" and it may even provide the checked opponent with a tempo (move opportunity) to move the king into a safer position.
Gaining tempo may be achieved, for example, by developing a piece while delivering check, though here, too, if the check can be countered by the development of a piece, the net result may be nil.

Chess tactic

tacticstactictactical
Sometimes such a check is part of a chess tactic such as a fork, a skewer, or a discovered attack on another piece.
Such forks checking a king are particularly effective, because the opponent is forced by the rules of chess to immediately remove the check to his king.

Fork (chess)

forkforkingforks
Sometimes such a check is part of a chess tactic such as a fork, a skewer, or a discovered attack on another piece.
A fork is most effective when it is, such as when the king is put in check.

Zwischenzug

An unexpected check in a forced combination or an overlooked cross-check in a planned series of checks may serve as sort of a zwischenzug, foiling the plan.
Such a move is also called an intermezzo, intermediate move, or in-between move . When the intermediate move is a check, it is sometimes called an "in-between check", "zwischenschach", or "zwischen-check".

Perpetual check

perpetually checks
Repetitive checking to prevent losing a game going poorly (i.e. to draw the game by perpetual check).
In the game of chess, perpetual check is a situation in which one player can a draw by an unending series of checks.

Discovered attack

discovered checkdiscovereddiscovered checks
Sometimes such a check is part of a chess tactic such as a fork, a skewer, or a discovered attack on another piece. A move of the king could expose the opposing king to a discovered check by another piece, however.
If the discovered attack is a check, it is called a discovered check.

Draw (chess)

drawdrawsdrew
Repetitive checking to prevent losing a game going poorly (i.e. to draw the game by perpetual check).
Draws are codified by various rules of chess including stalemate (when the player to move is not in check but has no legal move), threefold repetition (when the same position occurs three times with the same player to move), and the fifty-move rule (when the last fifty successive moves made by both players contain no or pawn move).

Skewer (chess)

skewerskewersskewering
Sometimes such a check is part of a chess tactic such as a fork, a skewer, or a discovered attack on another piece.
In an absolute skewer, the king is in check, therefore the check must be handled (under the rules of chess), whereas in a relative skewer, the pieces involved don't necessarily need to be addressed.

Algebraic notation (chess)

algebraic notationalgebraic chess notationalgebraic notation used for chess
In algebraic chess notation, a checking move is recorded like any other move, except that a "+" is normally written after the move.
A move that places the opponent's king in check usually has the symbol "+" appended.

List of Go terms

hayagoataritesuji
Atari in Game of Go
It can be a verb for the act of placing a chain under atari, as well as an adjective to describe the status of a unit, as being "in (the state of) atari". Calling out atari during a game is sometimes done by beginners much like calling out check in chess, but it is considered rude by many more advanced players.

En passant

Double check. A double check is a check from two pieces to the opponent's king in a single move. This happens when a moved piece attacks the king, resulting in a second piece giving check by discovered check. It can also happen, though very rarely, when an en passant capture opens two lines of attack simultaneously. In algebraic chess notation, a double check move is sometimes noted with a "++" after the written move in place of the usual "+", although "++" has been used to indicate checkmate (along with "#"). A double check cannot be blocked, nor can it be met by capturing one of the checking pieces (unless the king itself makes the capture), because there is check from two directions.
The same is true if an en passant capture is the only move to get out of check.

Xiangqi

Chinese chesschess Chinese Chess (Xiang-Qi)
A check is a condition in chess, shogi, and xiangqi that occurs when a player's king (or general in xiangqi) is under threat of on their opponent's next turn.

Chess piece

piecepieceschess pieces
A player must get out of check, if possible, by interposing a piece between the threatening piece and the king, capturing the threatening piece, or moving the king to a square where it is no longer in check.