A report on Chelsea, Manhattan

"Chelsea", drawn by a daughter of Clement Clarke Moore
The Cushman Row, 406-418 W. 20th St., dates from 1840
London Terrace occupies the entire block bounded Ninth and Tenth Avenues and 23rd and 24th Streets.
The Rubin Museum of Art
Chelsea Market contains a popular food hall
InterActiveCorp headquarters on Eleventh Avenue, designed by Frank Gehry
The Starrett–Lehigh Building with the rising skyscrapers of Hudson Yards rising in the background
An eastward facing view from the High Line. London Terrace is visible on the left.
The Chelsea Piers, New York City's primary luxury ocean liner terminal from 1910 until 1935
FDNY EMS Station 7
USPS maintenance facility, 11th Avenue
The Chelsea School
The Bayard Rustin Educational Complex in 1931, when it was Textile High School
The Muhlenberg branch of the New York Public Library

Chelsea contains the Chelsea Historic District and its extension, which were designated by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1970 and 1981 respectively.

- Chelsea, Manhattan

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West 23rd Street from the High Line
 (2014)

23rd Street (Manhattan)

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Broad thoroughfare in the New York City borough of Manhattan, one of the major two-way, east-west streets in the borough's grid.

Broad thoroughfare in the New York City borough of Manhattan, one of the major two-way, east-west streets in the borough's grid.

West 23rd Street from the High Line
 (2014)
The HL23 building overhanging the High Line park
The famous Flatiron Building sits on the intersection of 23rd Street (front), Broadway (left), and 5th Avenue (right)
Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Tower
The 23rd Street Ferry Terminal at the western end of the street in 1900
The former building of the National Academy Museum and School at the intersection of Park Avenue and 23rd Street in 1894
Former Stern Brothers department store
The New York Public Library's Epiphany branch on East 23rd Street
The M23 bus
a SIM4C bus on 23rd Street
The east end of the street, the East River. The New York Skyports Seaplane Base is the last building on the east end of 23rd.
Street staircase to the 23rd Street and Eighth Avenue station
Grand Opera House in 1937
Booth's Theatre
Proctor's Theatre in 1893

West of Sixth Avenue, West 23rd Street passes through Chelsea.

High Line

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1.45 mi elevated linear park, greenway and rail trail created on a former New York Central Railroad spur on the west side of Manhattan in New York City.

1.45 mi elevated linear park, greenway and rail trail created on a former New York Central Railroad spur on the west side of Manhattan in New York City.

The High Line between 14th and 15th Streets (where the tracks run through the second floor of the Chelsea Market building), with a side track and pedestrian bridge
The center section, opened in June 2011
The square at Tenth Avenue and 17th Street, where the "10th Avenue Square & Overlook" provides views of the street from a window placed in the space created by removing the structure's steel beams.
Train passing through the Bell Laboratories Building, seen from Washington Street in 1936. Only the track segment that runs through the third level of the building, and atop its two-story extension, still exists.
Bell Laboratories Building in 2017
Abandoned High Line tracks in 2009 (current phase 3 section at 34th Street)
Reconstructed tracks at 20th Street, 2010
The Whitney Museum of American Art opened its new building on Gansevoort Street, next to the south end of the High Line, in 2015.
The third phase, by 30th Street, in 2015

Originating in the Meatpacking District, the park runs from Gansevoort Street – three blocks below 14th Street – through Chelsea to the northern edge of the West Side Yard on 34th Street near the Javits Center.

The Penn South cooperative as seen from the Empire State Building

Penn South

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The Penn South cooperative as seen from the Empire State Building
Penn South buildings along Ninth Avenue
Seen from 26th Street

Penn South, officially known as Mutual Redevelopment Houses and formerly Penn Station South, is a limited-equity housing cooperative development located between Eighth and Ninth Avenues and West 23rd and 29th Streets, in the Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City.

The avenue at 17th Street, as seen from the High Line

Tenth Avenue (Manhattan)

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North-south thoroughfare on the West Side of Manhattan in New York City.

North-south thoroughfare on the West Side of Manhattan in New York City.

The avenue at 17th Street, as seen from the High Line
The avenue at 17th Street, as seen from the High Line
Amsterdam Avenue looking north from 119th Street toward Harlem
New residential tower at 60th Street
The Desmond Tutu Center of the General Theological Seminary at 20th–21st Streets
The Empire Diner at 22nd Street
The Yotel and MiMA at 42nd Street
An AT&T building at 811 10th Avenue, at the corner of W. 53rd St.
The interior of the Holy Name of Jesus Roman Catholic Church at 96th Street
The American Youth Hostels building at 103rd Street
The Cathedral of St. John the Divine at 110th Street
The former NYPD 32nd Precinct building on Amsterdam Avenue at 152nd Street
The Highbridge Play Center at 173rd Street
Zysman Hall of Yeshiva University, at 187th Street

Tenth Avenue runs through the Chelsea and Hell's Kitchen neighborhoods on the west side of the borough, and then as Amsterdam Avenue, through the Upper West Side, Morningside Heights, Harlem, and Washington Heights.

Midtown Manhattan

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Central portion of the New York City borough of Manhattan and serves as the city's primary central business district.

Central portion of the New York City borough of Manhattan and serves as the city's primary central business district.

in January 2020
Midtown Manhattan as viewed from the Empire State Building
Madison Square Garden
Times Square (2013), one of the world's busiest pedestrian intersections
"Korea Way" on 32nd Street in Manhattan's Koreatown (맨해튼 코리아타운)
The United Nations Secretariat Building at the United Nations Headquarters
Herald Square, with Macy's
The MetLife Building (formerly Pan Am Building)
NYPD 14th (Midtown South) Precinct
Engine Co. 54/Ladder Co. 4/Battalion 9
USPS Grand Central Station
New York Public Library Main Branch
Grand Central Terminal, seen from 42nd Street
Midtown Manhattan viewed from Weehauken, New Jersey, in September 2021, in the afternoon.
Midtown Manhattan viewed from Weehauken, New Jersey, in September 2021, at sunset.
Midtown Manhattan viewed from Weehauken, New Jersey, in September 2021, at night.

In addition to its central business district, Midtown Manhattan encompasses many neighborhoods, including Hell's Kitchen and Chelsea on the West Side, and Murray Hill, Kips Bay, Turtle Bay, and Gramercy Park on the East Side.

Chelsea Market from south on Ninth Avenue

Chelsea Market

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Chelsea Market from south on Ninth Avenue
The Ninth Avenue entrance to Chelsea Market
Various food establishments inside the Chelsea Market
Elevator to the MLB.com offices
Inside the Chelsea Market
The High Line between 14th and 15th streets where the tracks run through the second floor of the Chelsea Market building, with a side track and pedestrian bridge
alt=Chelsea Market's two levels featuring Pearl River Mart's colorful and cheery store above downstair's Chelsea Local|Stairs leading down to Chelsea Local featuring Pearl River Mart store

Chelsea Market is a food hall, shopping mall, office building and television production facility located in the Chelsea neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan, in New York City.

Hudson Yards, Manhattan

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Neighborhood on the West Side of Midtown Manhattan, bounded roughly by 30th Street in the south, 41st Street in the north, the West Side Highway in the west, and Eighth Avenue in the east.

Neighborhood on the West Side of Midtown Manhattan, bounded roughly by 30th Street in the south, 41st Street in the north, the West Side Highway in the west, and Eighth Avenue in the east.

Aerial view of location of the Hudson Yards area, including the rail yard in the foreground, the Javits Center on the upper left, and the blocks between Tenth and Eleventh avenues up to 43rd Street.
The new 34th Street subway station, September 2015
30th Street staging area for construction equipment and materials.
30 Hudson Yards (left, under construction), and 10 Hudson Yards (right, completed) in February 2017
Under construction, 2018
Renovated 450 West 33rd Street building in Manhattan West, home to the Associated Press.

The land parcel is bordered by 30th Street and Chelsea on the south, Twelfth Avenue on the west, 33rd Street and Hell's Kitchen on the north, and Tenth Avenue on the east.

Grand Opera House (Manhattan)

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Pike's Opera House, later renamed the Grand Opera House, was a theater in New York City on the northwest corner of 8th Avenue and 23rd Street, in the Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan.

Facing north from 32nd Street

Eighth Avenue (Manhattan)

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Major north–south avenue on the west side of Manhattan in New York City, carrying northbound traffic below 59th Street.

Major north–south avenue on the west side of Manhattan in New York City, carrying northbound traffic below 59th Street.

Facing north from 32nd Street
The Hearst Tower at West 57th Street and Eighth Avenue
The American Museum of Natural History
Housing cooperatives on CPW: The San Remo (far right), The Langham (center-right), The Dakota (center-left), and The Majestic (far left).
Police station at 148th Street
The north building of the Port Authority Bus Terminal at West 42nd Street
The James Farley Post Office, between West 31st and 33rd Street, will be partially converted into a replacement for the current Penn Station
The original New York Cancer Hospital,<ref name=Barbanel>Barbanel, Josh. "Would an Aardvark Live Here?" The New York Times, September 17, 2006. Accessed December 31, 2009.</ref> built between 1884 and 1886, now housing, at 455 Central Park West and 106th Street
The former Inland Freight Terminal at 111 Eighth Avenue, now home to Google

Eighth Avenue begins in the West Village neighborhood at Abingdon Square (where Hudson Street becomes Eighth Avenue at an intersection with Bleecker Street) and runs north for 44 blocks through Chelsea, the Garment District, Hell's Kitchen's east end, Midtown and the Broadway theatre district in the eponymous neighborhood, before it finally enters Columbus Circle at 59th Street and becomes Central Park West.

An 1893 redrawing of the 1807 version of the Commissioners' grid plan for Manhattan, a few years before it was adopted in 1811

Commissioners' Plan of 1811

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The original design for the streets of Manhattan above Houston Street and below 155th Street, which put in place the rectangular grid plan of streets and lots that has defined Manhattan on its march uptown until the current day.

The original design for the streets of Manhattan above Houston Street and below 155th Street, which put in place the rectangular grid plan of streets and lots that has defined Manhattan on its march uptown until the current day.

An 1893 redrawing of the 1807 version of the Commissioners' grid plan for Manhattan, a few years before it was adopted in 1811
The city blocks of Portland, Oregon; Savannah, Georgia; and Manhattan shown at the same scale
"A Portraiture of the City of Philadelphia" (1683) by Thomas Holme, the first map of the city.
A portion of a map of the city from 1776; De Lancey Square and the grid around it can be seen on the right
The Mangin–Goerck Plan of 1803; the "warning label" can be seen at the bottom under "Plan of the City of New York"
The only known image of John Randel Jr., the Commission's chief surveyor, by an unknown artist, probably Ezra Ames.
The park-like grounds of the American Museum of Natural Historycalled "Theodore Roosevelt Park" since 1958, but officially part of Central Parkis the only one of the planned public spaces of the Commissioners' Plan which still exists; it was to be "Manhattan Square".
This one of John Randel's survey bolts marked the location of what would have been Sixth Avenue and 65th Street; the location later became part of Central Park
One of Randel's 92 detailed "Farm Maps", showing how the Manhattan grid would sit on the island's topography and extant farms and homesteads. This one is bounded by West 36th Street, Sixth Avenue, West 15th Street, and the Hudson River.
William M. "Boss" Tweed (1870)
Central Park is by far the largest interruption of the Commissioners' grid, running from Central Park South (59th Street, at the right) to 110th Street (on the left), and from Fifth Avenue (at the top) to Central Park West (Eighth Avenue, at the bottom), and at 843 acre, taking up a little over 6% of the area of Manhattan island.
Andrew Haswell Green, a critic of the Commissioners' Plan, headed the Central Park Commission, which created the street plan for Manhattan above 155th Street
The Knapp map of 1870 shows the progress made in laying out streets above 155th Street as called for in the Central Park Commission's 1868 plan
In 1945, Sixth Avenue was officially renamed "Avenue of the Americas", and was adorned with circular signs for each member country of the Organization of American States, such as this one for Venezuela. The name never caught on with New Yorkers, though, who still insist on calling it "Sixth Avenue". After decades of requiring only one official name, the city at last began to co-sign the avenue with both names. Currently, "Avenue of the Americas" is generally only seen on business stationery and official city documents, or heard from the mouths of tourists.
Frederick Law Olmsted, vociferous critic of the Commissioners' Plan (c.1860)
Clement Clarke Moore objected to the Plan, but made a fortune developing his estate once the Plan's streets were laid down through it. (1897)
Henry James (1910)
Lewis Mumford, a vehement critic of the Commissioners' Plan
Thomas Janvier, an illustration from In Old New York (1894)
Jean-Paul Sartre (c.1950)
Dutch artist Piet Mondrian drew inspiration from the vibrancy of the grid, displaying it in paintings such as Broadway Boogie Woogie (1942).

In 1818, Clement Clarke Moore, the author of A Visit from St. Nicholasprobably better known as "Twas the Night Before Christmas"whose estate "Chelsea" would be chopped up by the plan, wrote in "A Plain Statement, addressed to the Proprietors of Real Estate, in the City and County of New York" :