Chelsea Physic Garden

Apothecaries' GardenChelsea Botanical GardenApothecaries GardensApothecaries' Garden at ChelseaChelsea Botanic GardenChelsea GardenChelsea Physick GardenPhysic GardenSloane herbarium
The Chelsea Physic Garden was established as the Apothecaries' Garden in London, England, in 1673 by the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries to grow plants to be used as medicines.wikipedia
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Worshipful Society of Apothecaries

Society of ApothecariesLSALicentiate of the Society of Apothecaries
The Chelsea Physic Garden was established as the Apothecaries' Garden in London, England, in 1673 by the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries to grow plants to be used as medicines. The Worshipful Society of Apothecaries initially established the garden on a leased site of Sir John Danvers' well-established garden in Chelsea, London. Jealously guarded during the tenure of the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries, the Garden became in 1983 a registered charity and was opened to the general public for the first time.
The Apothecaries' Garden, established in 1673 by the Society to grow plants to be used as medicines, still exists as the Chelsea Physic Garden.

Botanical garden

botanical gardensbotanic gardenbotanic gardens
This four acre physic garden, the term here referring to the science of healing, is among the oldest botanical gardens in Britain, after the University of Oxford Botanic Garden, which was founded in 1621 and the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh founded in 1670.
The tradition of these Italian gardens passed into Spain Botanical Garden of Valencia, 1567) and Northern Europe, where similar gardens were established in the Netherlands (Hortus Botanicus Leiden, 1587; Hortus Botanicus (Amsterdam), 1638), Germany (Alter Botanischer Garten Tübingen, 1535; Leipzig Botanical Garden, 1580; Botanischer Garten Jena, 1586; Botanischer Garten Heidelberg, 1593; Herrenhäuser Gärten, Hanover, 1666; Botanischer Garten der Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, 1669; Botanical Garden in Berlin, 1672), Switzerland (Old Botanical Garden, Zürich, 1560; Basel, 1589); England (University of Oxford Botanic Garden, 1621; Chelsea Physic Garden, 1673); Scotland (Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, 1670); and in France (Jardin des plantes de Montpellier, 1593; Faculty of Medicine Garden, Paris, 1597; Jardin des Plantes, Paris, 1635), Denmark (University of Copenhagen Botanical Garden, 1600); Sweden (Uppsala University, 1655).

Physic garden

herb gardenherbphysic gardeners
This four acre physic garden, the term here referring to the science of healing, is among the oldest botanical gardens in Britain, after the University of Oxford Botanic Garden, which was founded in 1621 and the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh founded in 1670.
Begun in Westminster and later moved to Chelsea, the Apothecaries founded the Chelsea Physic Garden in 1673, of which Philip Miller, author of The Gardeners Dictionary, was the most notable Director.

Philip Miller

Mill.MillerP. Mill.
That initiated the golden age of the Chelsea Physic Garden under the direction of Philip Miller (1722–1770), when it became the world's most richly stocked botanic garden.
Born in Deptford or Greenwich Miller was chief gardener at the Chelsea Physic Garden from 1722 until he was pressured to retire shortly before his death.

Isaac Rand

Rand
Isaac Rand, a member and a fellow of the Royal Society published a condensed catalogue of the Garden in 1730, Index plantarum officinalium, quas ad materiae medicae scientiam promovendam, in horto Chelseiano. Elizabeth Blackwell's A Curious Herbal (1737–39) was illustrated partly from specimens taken from the Chelsea Physic Garden.
Isaac was probably son of James Rand, who in 1674 agreed, with thirteen other members of the Society of Apothecaries, to build a wall round the Chelsea Botanical Garden.

Hans Sloane

Sir Hans SloaneSloane CollectionSloane manuscripts
In 1713, Dr Hans Sloane purchased from Charles Cheyne the adjacent Manor of Chelsea, about 4 acre, which he leased in 1722 to the Society of Apothecaries for £5 a year in perpetuity, requiring only that the Garden supply the Royal Society, of which he was a principal, with 50 good herbarium samples per year, up to a total of 2,000 plants.
His purchase of the manor of Chelsea, London, in 1712, provided the grounds for the Chelsea Physic Garden.

Chelsea, London

ChelseaChelsea, EnglandChelsea, Middlesex
In 1713, Dr Hans Sloane purchased from Charles Cheyne the adjacent Manor of Chelsea, about 4 acre, which he leased in 1722 to the Society of Apothecaries for £5 a year in perpetuity, requiring only that the Garden supply the Royal Society, of which he was a principal, with 50 good herbarium samples per year, up to a total of 2,000 plants. The Worshipful Society of Apothecaries initially established the garden on a leased site of Sir John Danvers' well-established garden in Chelsea, London.
The area is home to several open spaces including Albert Bridge Gardens, Battersea Bridge Gardens, Chelsea Embankment Gardens, Royal Hospital Chelsea: the grounds of which are used by the annual Chelsea Flower Show and Chelsea Physic Garden.

Elizabeth Blackwell (illustrator)

Elizabeth Blackwell
Isaac Rand, a member and a fellow of the Royal Society published a condensed catalogue of the Garden in 1730, Index plantarum officinalium, quas ad materiae medicae scientiam promovendam, in horto Chelseiano. Elizabeth Blackwell's A Curious Herbal (1737–39) was illustrated partly from specimens taken from the Chelsea Physic Garden.
To compensate for this, she was aided by Isaac Rand, then curator of the Chelsea Physick Garden, where many of these new plants were under cultivation.

Royal Hospital Road

Parts of this classic garden have been lost to road development – the river bank during 1874 construction of the Chelsea Embankment on the north bank of the River Thames, and a strip of the garden to allow widening of Royal Hospital Road.
To the south is the Chelsea Physic Garden.

University of Oxford Botanic Garden

Oxford Botanic GardenBotanic GardenOxford Botanical Garden
This four acre physic garden, the term here referring to the science of healing, is among the oldest botanical gardens in Britain, after the University of Oxford Botanic Garden, which was founded in 1621 and the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh founded in 1670.

Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh

Royal Botanic GardenRoyal Botanic Garden, EdinburghRoyal Botanic Gardens
This four acre physic garden, the term here referring to the science of healing, is among the oldest botanical gardens in Britain, after the University of Oxford Botanic Garden, which was founded in 1621 and the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh founded in 1670.

Rock garden

rockeryrockeriesrock gardens
Its rock garden is the oldest English garden devoted to alpine plants.

Alpine plant

alpinealpine floraalpine plants
Its rock garden is the oldest English garden devoted to alpine plants.

Olive

olivesolive treeOlea europaea
The largest fruiting olive tree in Britain is there, protected by the garden's heat-trapping high brick walls, along with what is doubtless the world's northernmost grapefruit growing outdoors.

Grapefruit

pink grapefruitCitrus paradisiCitrus x paradisi
The largest fruiting olive tree in Britain is there, protected by the garden's heat-trapping high brick walls, along with what is doubtless the world's northernmost grapefruit growing outdoors.

Charitable organization

charityregistered charitycharities
Jealously guarded during the tenure of the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries, the Garden became in 1983 a registered charity and was opened to the general public for the first time.

Register of Historic Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest in England

Register of Historic Parks and GardensNational Register of Historic Parks and GardensRegister of Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest in England
It is also Grade I listed in the Register of Historic Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest in England by English Heritage.

English Heritage

EHAncient Monuments BoardEnglish Heritage Trust
It is also Grade I listed in the Register of Historic Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest in England by English Heritage.

John Danvers

Sir John DanversDanversJohn
The Worshipful Society of Apothecaries initially established the garden on a leased site of Sir John Danvers' well-established garden in Chelsea, London.

Thomas More

Sir Thomas MoreSt. Thomas MoreSaint Thomas More
This house, called Danvers House, adjoined the mansion that had once been the house of Sir Thomas More.

Pound sterling

£GBPpounds
In 1713, Dr Hans Sloane purchased from Charles Cheyne the adjacent Manor of Chelsea, about 4 acre, which he leased in 1722 to the Society of Apothecaries for £5 a year in perpetuity, requiring only that the Garden supply the Royal Society, of which he was a principal, with 50 good herbarium samples per year, up to a total of 2,000 plants.

Royal Society

FRSRoyal Society of LondonThe Royal Society
In 1713, Dr Hans Sloane purchased from Charles Cheyne the adjacent Manor of Chelsea, about 4 acre, which he leased in 1722 to the Society of Apothecaries for £5 a year in perpetuity, requiring only that the Garden supply the Royal Society, of which he was a principal, with 50 good herbarium samples per year, up to a total of 2,000 plants.

Herbarium

herbariahortus siccusHortorium
In 1713, Dr Hans Sloane purchased from Charles Cheyne the adjacent Manor of Chelsea, about 4 acre, which he leased in 1722 to the Society of Apothecaries for £5 a year in perpetuity, requiring only that the Garden supply the Royal Society, of which he was a principal, with 50 good herbarium samples per year, up to a total of 2,000 plants.

Paul Hermann (botanist)

Paul Hermann
Its seed-exchange programme was established following a visit in 1682 from Paul Hermann, a Dutch botanist connected with the Hortus Botanicus Leiden and has lasted till the present day.