Chelsea Piers

Chelsea Piers as seen from the air. Pier 62 is on the left, with the driving range of Pier 59 partially visible on the right
Chelsea Piers from the West Side Highway
Golf club entrance
The RMS Carpathia at Pier 54 after the RMS Titanic rescue
The archway is the only remaining identifiable piece of the pier
Pier 54 in 2012
The RMS Lusitania at Pier 54
Chelsea Piers and Lusitania about 1910
The archway of Cunard Pier 54
View of Chelsea Piers and Venus Mural

Series of piers in Chelsea, on the West Side of Manhattan in New York City.

- Chelsea Piers
Chelsea Piers as seen from the air. Pier 62 is on the left, with the driving range of Pier 59 partially visible on the right

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Looking east across lower Manhattan, from the middle of the Hudson River just north of Christopher Street in the West Village, circa 1932-1933

Hudson River Park

Waterside park on the North River that extends from 59th Street south to Battery Park in the New York City borough of Manhattan.

Waterside park on the North River that extends from 59th Street south to Battery Park in the New York City borough of Manhattan.

Looking east across lower Manhattan, from the middle of the Hudson River just north of Christopher Street in the West Village, circa 1932-1933
The Hudson River Park near the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center
Pier 76 open in June 2021
Three visitors sunning in the park
Hudson River Park at 46th Street
Hudson River Park with Empire State Building in the background
Pier 84
2017 terror attack in Hudson River Park
Permanent safety bollards were installed in Hudson River Park's bike path following a series of deadly incidents.

A new plan for development was announced in 1992 by then-Governor Mario Cuomo and then-Mayor David Dinkins, targeting Pier 76 opposite the Javits Center, Chelsea Piers, and Pier 40 as key locations for commercial development that would support the park.

Chelsea, Manhattan

Chelsea contains the Chelsea Historic District and its extension, which were designated by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1970 and 1981 respectively.

Chelsea contains the Chelsea Historic District and its extension, which were designated by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1970 and 1981 respectively.

"Chelsea", drawn by a daughter of Clement Clarke Moore
The Cushman Row, 406-418 W. 20th St., dates from 1840
London Terrace occupies the entire block bounded Ninth and Tenth Avenues and 23rd and 24th Streets.
The Rubin Museum of Art
Chelsea Market contains a popular food hall
InterActiveCorp headquarters on Eleventh Avenue, designed by Frank Gehry
The Starrett–Lehigh Building with the rising skyscrapers of Hudson Yards rising in the background
An eastward facing view from the High Line. London Terrace is visible on the left.
The Chelsea Piers, New York City's primary luxury ocean liner terminal from 1910 until 1935
FDNY EMS Station 7
USPS maintenance facility, 11th Avenue
The Chelsea School
The Bayard Rustin Educational Complex in 1931, when it was Textile High School
The Muhlenberg branch of the New York Public Library

The Chelsea Piers were the city's primary luxury ocean liner terminal from 1910 until 1935, when the growing size of ships made the complex inadequate.

The Jacob K. Javits Convention Center

Eleventh Avenue (Manhattan)

North–south thoroughfare on the far West Side of the borough of Manhattan in New York City, located near the Hudson River.

North–south thoroughfare on the far West Side of the borough of Manhattan in New York City, located near the Hudson River.

The Jacob K. Javits Convention Center
Jean Nouvel's Nouvel 100
Straus Park and the upper end of West End Avenue
10 West End Avenue underconstruction
381 to 389 West End Avenue, north end of Riverside-West End Historic District
Starrett-Lehigh Building
Whitney Museum of American Art at Gansevoort Street and Eleventh Avenue under construction in 2013
The IAC Building with Jean Nouvel's 100 Eleventh Avenue (behind and to the left) in 2010
Eleventh Avenue, looking south at 26th Street
Silver Towers

Following the split, Eleventh Avenue is two-way traffic for access to 23rd Street, as well as for 24th Street to access Chelsea Piers.

Stretch of the Hudson River (in red) between New Jersey and Manhattan anachronistically referred to as the North River

North River (Hudson River)

Alternative name for the southernmost portion of the Hudson River in the vicinity of New York City and northeastern New Jersey in the United States.

Alternative name for the southernmost portion of the Hudson River in the vicinity of New York City and northeastern New Jersey in the United States.

Stretch of the Hudson River (in red) between New Jersey and Manhattan anachronistically referred to as the North River
The Hudson looking south from atop the Hudson Palisades, anachronistically referred to by some as the North River
Flight 1549 landed on the Hudson River in waters referred to by some as the North River.
Revolutionary-era map using both names
North River label of a stretch of the Hudson River between Hudson County, New Jersey, and Lower Manhattan on a 1997 Hagstrom Map of Manhattan
Chelsea Piers, with the Lusitania docked, circa 1910
Rebuilding of Pier 97 in Hudson River Park
Javits Center, behind which is located New York Waterway's Midtown Ferry Terminal at Pier 79. The Weehawken Yards were across the river at the base of the Hudson Palisades.
Railroad and ferry terminals along the North River circa 1900

Pier 54, part of Hudson River Park since its creation in 1998, was closed in 2011 when it was deemed structurally unsound. Plans were unveiled in November 2014 for a new park designed by Heatherwick Studio and costing $130 million. The project was temporarily canceled in 2017 after costs had grown to $250 million, but was later revived as part of an agreement to complete the remainder of Hudson River Park. The new park, dubbed "Little Island," will take the place of the now-dismantled Piers 54 and 55, and is expected to open in 2021.

West 23rd Street from the High Line
 (2014)

23rd Street (Manhattan)

Broad thoroughfare in the New York City borough of Manhattan, one of the major two-way, east-west streets in the borough's grid.

Broad thoroughfare in the New York City borough of Manhattan, one of the major two-way, east-west streets in the borough's grid.

West 23rd Street from the High Line
 (2014)
The HL23 building overhanging the High Line park
The famous Flatiron Building sits on the intersection of 23rd Street (front), Broadway (left), and 5th Avenue (right)
Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Tower
The 23rd Street Ferry Terminal at the western end of the street in 1900
The former building of the National Academy Museum and School at the intersection of Park Avenue and 23rd Street in 1894
Former Stern Brothers department store
The New York Public Library's Epiphany branch on East 23rd Street
The M23 bus
a SIM4C bus on 23rd Street
The east end of the street, the East River. The New York Skyports Seaplane Base is the last building on the east end of 23rd.
Street staircase to the 23rd Street and Eighth Avenue station
Grand Opera House in 1937
Booth's Theatre
Proctor's Theatre in 1893

For much of the late 19th century and early 20th century its western end was the site of the Pavonia Ferry at Pier 63, just north of the current Chelsea Piers.

1860 map showing Thirteenth Avenue between West 12th and West 19th Streets

Thirteenth Avenue (Manhattan)

Street in the New York City borough of Manhattan, New York City.

Street in the New York City borough of Manhattan, New York City.

1860 map showing Thirteenth Avenue between West 12th and West 19th Streets
West Washington Market on the Gansevoort Peninsula, on a map published in 1904
13th Avenue as seen from the north in 2008, with World Financial Center in background
Gansevoort Peninsula cleared (2018)

The avenue was later removed in the early 20th century to make way for the Chelsea Piers.

The font used in the series title card, Friz Quadrata, is used in the identifying sign of One Police Plaza, headquarters of the NYPD.

Law & Order

American police procedural and legal drama television series created by Dick Wolf and produced by Wolf Entertainment, launching the Law & Order franchise.

American police procedural and legal drama television series created by Dick Wolf and produced by Wolf Entertainment, launching the Law & Order franchise.

The font used in the series title card, Friz Quadrata, is used in the identifying sign of One Police Plaza, headquarters of the NYPD.

The sets were located at Chelsea Piers.

Law & Order: Special Victims Unit

American crime drama television series created by Dick Wolf's own production company, Wolf Entertainment, for NBC.

American crime drama television series created by Dick Wolf's own production company, Wolf Entertainment, for NBC.

Dick Wolf (pictured in 2010), the creator and executive producer of Law & Order: Special Victims Unit.
Mariska Hargitay, Christopher Meloni and Ice-T during filming of the 12th season.
Danny Pino and Hargitay during the filming of the 13th season.
SVU shooting on location in Central Park at night

The show moved into the studio space at Chelsea Piers that had been occupied by the original Law & Order series until its cancellation in May 2010.

The Normandie, renamed USS Lafayette, lies capsized in the frozen mud at Pier 88 in the winter of 1942

Manhattan Cruise Terminal

Ship terminal for ocean-going passenger ships in Hell's Kitchen, Manhattan, New York City.

Ship terminal for ocean-going passenger ships in Hell's Kitchen, Manhattan, New York City.

The Normandie, renamed USS Lafayette, lies capsized in the frozen mud at Pier 88 in the winter of 1942
From downstream in the river

They were first completed in 1935 to replace the Chelsea Piers as the city's luxury liner terminal.

Lusitania, shortly before her launch

RMS Lusitania

British ocean liner that was launched by the Cunard Line in 1906 and that held the Blue Riband appellation for the fastest Atlantic crossing in 1908.

British ocean liner that was launched by the Cunard Line in 1906 and that held the Blue Riband appellation for the fastest Atlantic crossing in 1908.

Lusitania, shortly before her launch
RMS Lusitania: Built in 1904-1906
Lusitania unloading Christmas mail to a post office boat
Early concept art of Lusitania with three funnels
Deck plans of Lusitania. Modifications were made both during and after the ship's construction. By 1915 the lifeboat arrangement had been changed to 11 fixed boats on either side, plus collapsible boats stored under each lifeboat and on the poop deck.
Painting of Lusitania by Norman Wilkinson
Lounge and music room
Verandah cafe
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Finished first-class dining room
First-class smoking room
First-class reading and writing room
Lusitanias launch, 7 June 1906
arriving at port on maiden voyage June 1911, with Lusitania departing in the background
Lusitania arriving in New York on her maiden voyage
Stereo picture of Wright Flyer, Lusitania (Europe-bound), and the Statue of Liberty, during Hudson Fulton Celebration. In a generation the aeroplane would replace ocean queens like Lusitania as the mainstay of trans-atlantic travel.
Germany's declared exclusion zone of February 1915. Ships within this area were liable to search and attack.
Captain Daniel Dow, Lusitanias penultimate master
The official warning issued by the Imperial German Embassy about travelling on Lusitania
Captain William Thomas Turner, photographed on 11 March 1915.
Lusitania departing New York on her final voyage, 1 May 1915
The New York Times article expressed the immediate recognition of the serious implications of the sinking, this lead story on 8 May having a section (below what is pictured here) titled "Nation's Course in Doubt".
One of the propellers salvaged from the RMS Lusitania, located at Merseyside Maritime Museum in Liverpool
Tritonia

The ship departed Pier 54 in New York, on 1 May 1915 at 12:20 p.m. A few hours after the vessel's departure, the Saturday evening edition of The Washington Times published two articles on its front page, both referring to those warnings.