Chernivtsi

CzernowitzCernăuțiCernăuţiChernovtsyChernowitzCzerniowceCernautiChernivtsyChernovitzCzernovitz
Chernivtsi (Чернівці́ ; Cernăuți; see also other names) is a city in western Ukraine.wikipedia
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Western Ukraine

West UkrainewesternWestern Ukrainian
Chernivtsi (Чернівці́ ; Cernăuți; see also other names) is a city in western Ukraine.
Important cities are Buchach, Chernivtsi, Drohobych, Halych (hence - Halychyna), Ivano-Frankivsk, Khotyn, Lutsk, Lviv, Mukacheve, Rivne, Ternopil, Uzhhorod and others.

City of regional significance (Ukraine)

city of oblast significancecity of regional significancetown of oblast significance
Administratively, Chernivtsi is a city of regional significance.

Chernivtsi Oblast

ChernivtsiChernivtsi regionChernivetska Oblast
It is situated on the upper course of the River Prut, and is the administrative center of Chernivtsi Oblast (province) – the northern, Ukrainian part of the historical region of Bukovina. In 1940, the Red Army occupied the area; the area around the city became known as Chernivtsi Oblast, and was allotted to the Ukrainian SSR by the Soviet Union.
Its capital is the city Chernivtsi.

Chernivtsi International Airport

Chernivtsi AirportChernivtsiChernovtsy Airport
The city is a major regional rail and road transportation hub, also housing an international airport.
Chernivtsi Leonid Kadeniuk International Airport is an airport in the city of Chernivtsi in western Ukraine.

Names of European cities in different languages (C–D)

cities' alternative namesother namesOther names of Chișinău
Chernivtsi (Чернівці́ ; Cernăuți; see also other names) is a city in western Ukraine.

Cernăuți County

Cernăuțihomonymous ''ținut'' (county)
Between 1359 and 1775, the city and its surroundings were part of the Principality of Moldavia, one of the historic provinces of Romania; the city being the administrative center of the homonymous ținut (county).
Cernăuți County was a county (județ) of Romania, in Bukovina, with the capital city at Cernăuți.

Prut

Prut RiverPruthRiver Prut
It is situated on the upper course of the River Prut, and is the administrative center of Chernivtsi Oblast (province) – the northern, Ukrainian part of the historical region of Bukovina.
The largest city along its banks is Chernivtsi, Ukraine.

Traian Popovici

The Romanian mayor of the city Traian Popovici managed to persuade Antonescu to raise the number of Jews exempted from deportation from 200 to 20,000.
Traian Popovici (October 17, 1892 – June 4, 1946) was a Romanian lawyer and mayor of Cernăuţi during World War II, known for saving 20,000 Jews of Bukovina from deportation.

Sadhora

SadiguraSadagóraSadagura
Sadhora (Садгора; Sadagora; Sadagóra; Sadagura; סאדיגורא Sadigora, also Sadagura and Sadiger) is a settlement in Ukraine, now a Sadhirskyi District of Chernivtsi city, which is located 6 km from the city center.

Yiddishist movement

Yiddish RenaissanceYiddishistYiddishism
In 1908, it was the site of the first Yiddish language conference, the Czernowitz Conference, coordinated by Nathan Birnbaum.
From 30 August to 3 September 1908, "The Conference for the Yiddish Language", also known as "The Czernowitz Conference" (Yiddish קאָנפֿערענץ פֿאָר דער ייִדישער שפּראַך, or טשערנאָוויצער קאָנפֿערענץ, Konferents for der Yidisher Shprakh, or Tshernovitser Konferents), took place in the Austro-Hungarian city of Czernowitz, Bukovina (today in southwestern Ukraine).

University of Chernivtsi

Chernivtsi UniversityUniversity of CzernowitzCzernowitz University
The main architectural attractions of the city include: the Chernivtsi Drama Theater (1905); the Chernivtsi University—UNESCO World Heritage Site (1882); the Regional Museum of Fine Arts—the former savings bank (1900); the Regional Council—former Palace of Justice (1906); and the Chernivtsi Palace of Culture—former Jewish National House (1908); among many others.
Chernivtsi National University (full name Yuriy Fedkovych Chernivtsi National University, Чернівецький національний університет імені Юрія Федьковича) is a public university in the City of Chernivtsi in Western Ukraine.

Mila Kunis

Milena "Mila" KunisScott Moore (sergeant)
A famous member of this latter emigration is the actress Mila Kunis.
Milena Markovna Kunis was born on August 14, 1983, in Chernivtsi, Ukrainian SSR in the Soviet Union.

Karl Emil Franzos

KE Franzos
In the late 19th century the German language—due to the Habsburg and the very important Jewish influence—became the lingua franca and more and more newspapers were edited in German, also a remarkable literary production in German began in this period, featuring most prominently Karl Emil Franzos.
His father died when he was ten and his mother moved to the Bukovina capital Czernowitz (Chernivtsi).

Bukovinian State Medical University

BSMUChernovtsy Medical Institute
Bukovinian State Medical University (abbreviated as BSMU or БДМУ) is one of the largest higher educational establishment in Chernivtsi.

FSC Bukovyna Chernivtsi

Bukovyna ChernivtsiFC Bukovyna ChernivtsiFC Avanhard Chernivtsi
Chernivtsi's baseball, hockey, and football clubs (FC Bukovyna Chernivtsi) are participants of the Ukrainian national championships.
Football Sports Club Bukovyna Chernivtsi is a Ukrainian professional football club based in Chernivtsi.

Soviet occupation of Bessarabia and northern Bukovina

Soviet occupation of Bessarabiaoccupied by the Soviet UnionSoviet occupation
In 1940, the Red Army occupied the area; the area around the city became known as Chernivtsi Oblast, and was allotted to the Ukrainian SSR by the Soviet Union.
Thus, on October 25, 1918, a Ukrainian National Committee, gaining the upper hand in Czernowitz, declared northern Bukovina, populated by a Ukrainian majority, part of the West Ukrainian People's Republic.

Czernowitz Synagogue

Great SynagogueSynagogue Chernivtsi
The magnificent Moorish Revival Czernowitz Synagogue was heavily damaged by fire in 1941, the walls were used to create the "Chernivtsi" movie theater.
The Czernowitz Synagogue was a domed, Moorish Revival synagogue built in 1873 in Czernowitz, Austria-Hungary (today Chernivtsi, Ukraine).

Bukovina Germans

Bukovina GermanGermansBukovina
In 1930, the city reached a population of 112,400: 26.8% Jews, 23.2% Romanians, 20.8% Germans, 18.6% Ukrainians, the remainder Poles and others.

Bukovina

Northern BukovinaBucovinaBukovyna
It is situated on the upper course of the River Prut, and is the administrative center of Chernivtsi Oblast (province) – the northern, Ukrainian part of the historical region of Bukovina.
In 1497 a battle took place at the Cosmin Forest (the hilly forests separating Chernivtsi and Siret valleys), at which Stephen III of Moldavia (Stephen the Great), managed to defeat the much-stronger but demoralized army of King John I Albert of Poland.

Suceava

SuczawaBurdujeniCetatea Sucevei
Between 1775 and 1918, Suceava was the third most populous urban settlement of the Duchy of Bukovina (Herzogtum Bukowina), a constituent province of the Austrian Empire and subsequently a crown land within Austria-Hungary, being solely surpassed by Cernăuți (Czernowitz) and Rădăuți (Radautz), both located to the north.

List of World Heritage Sites in Ukraine

List of UNESCO World Heritage Sites in UkraineUNESCO World Heritage SiteUkraine
The main architectural attractions of the city include: the Chernivtsi Drama Theater (1905); the Chernivtsi University—UNESCO World Heritage Site (1882); the Regional Museum of Fine Arts—the former savings bank (1900); the Regional Council—former Palace of Justice (1906); and the Chernivtsi Palace of Culture—former Jewish National House (1908); among many others.

Rose Ausländer

Born in Czernowitz in the Bukovina, she lived through its tumultuous history of belonging to the Austro-Hungarian Empire, Kingdom of Romania, and eventually the Soviet Union.

Nathan Birnbaum

Mathias Ascher
In 1908, it was the site of the first Yiddish language conference, the Czernowitz Conference, coordinated by Nathan Birnbaum.
He was chief convener of the Conference for the Yiddish Language held in Czernowitz, August 30 –September 3, 1908.

Ninon Hesse

Ninon Ausländer
Ninon Hesse (née Ausländer; 18 September 1895, in Czernowitz – 22 September 1966, in Montagnola) was an art historian and Hermann Hesse's third wife.

Paul Celan

CelanCelan, Paul
He was born as Paul Antschel to a Jewish family in Cernăuți (German: Czernowitz), in the then Kingdom of Romania (now Chernivtsi, Ukraine), and adopted the pseudonym "Paul Celan".