Cherry Springs State Park

Cherry Springs State Park is an 82 acre Pennsylvania state park in Potter County, Pennsylvania, United States.wikipedia
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International Dark-Sky Association

International Dark Sky AssociationInternational Dark Sky ReserveInternational Dark Sky
On June 11, 2007, the International Dark-Sky Association named it the second "International Dark Sky Park"; under optimum conditions the Milky Way casts a discernible shadow.

Cherry Springs Airport

The adjoining Cherry Springs Airport, built in 1935, was closed and its land was added to the park in 2006, to expand its stargazing area.
It was built as an emergency landing field during the Great Depression on land that was part of the Susquehannock State Forest, just north of Cherry Springs State Park.

West Branch Township, Potter County, Pennsylvania

West Branch TownshipWest BranchWest Branch Township, Pennsylvania
The park was created from land within the Susquehannock State Forest, and is on Pennsylvania Route 44 in West Branch Township.
Cherry Springs State Park is a popular destination for astronomical observation.

Susquehannock State Forest

Susquehannock
The park was created from land within the Susquehannock State Forest, and is on Pennsylvania Route 44 in West Branch Township.

Pennsylvania Route 44

PA 4444Jersey Shore Pike
The park was created from land within the Susquehannock State Forest, and is on Pennsylvania Route 44 in West Branch Township. (Modern Pennsylvania Route 44, which passes through the park, follows the course of this path between Jersey Shore and Coudersport.) In 1818 the Ceres Land Company, which owned much of the land in Potter County and sought to open the area to settlement, hired an early settler, Jonathan Edgcomb, to build a tavern or hotel for travelers at the site of the park.
PA 44 makes a sharp turn to the northwest and reenters West Branch Township, where it passes through Cherry Springs State Park before heading through the community of Cherry Springs.

Dark-sky preserve

Dark Sky Parkdark sky preserveInternational Dark Sky Park
Cherry Springs State Park was named Pennsylvania's first dark sky park by the DCNR in 2000.

Coudersport, Pennsylvania

CoudersportCloudersportCoudersport PA
(Modern Pennsylvania Route 44, which passes through the park, follows the course of this path between Jersey Shore and Coudersport.) In 1818 the Ceres Land Company, which owned much of the land in Potter County and sought to open the area to settlement, hired an early settler, Jonathan Edgcomb, to build a tavern or hotel for travelers at the site of the park.
Coudersport is located near Cherry Springs State Park, which features some of the darkest skies on the East Coast.

Denton Hill State Park

The study also recommended that the DCNR shield and redirect lights at the nearby Denton Hill State Park downhill ski area to make the sky even darker at Cherry Springs. Cherry Springs State Park is at the southern end of a 15 mi long, single-track mountain bike trail, which begins at Denton Hill State Park and passes through Patterson State Park.
A mountain bike trail begins at Denton Hill State Park and is 15 mi long, passing through Patterson State Park on its way to Cherry Springs State Park.

Susquehannock Trail System

Susquehannock TrailSUS
The 85 mi long Susquehannock Trail System passes close to the park and loops around it.
The fire tower is 1.9 mi southeast of Cherry Springs State Park and is just east of Cherry Springs Vista, which looks to the south.

Patterson State Park

Patterson
Cherry Springs State Park is at the southern end of a 15 mi long, single-track mountain bike trail, which begins at Denton Hill State Park and passes through Patterson State Park.
A mountain bike trail begins at Denton Hill State Park and runs 15 mi as it passes through Patterson State Park on its way to Cherry Springs State Park.

Potter County, Pennsylvania

Potter CountyPotterPotter Counties
Cherry Springs State Park is an 82 acre Pennsylvania state park in Potter County, Pennsylvania, United States.

Pennsylvania

PACommonwealth of PennsylvaniaPa.
Cherry Springs State Park is an 82 acre Pennsylvania state park in Potter County, Pennsylvania, United States.

Prunus serotina

black cherrycapulinblack cherries
Cherry Springs, named for a large stand of Black Cherry trees in the park, is atop the dissected Allegheny Plateau at an elevation of 2300 ft. It is popular with astronomers and stargazers for having "some of the darkest night skies on the east coast" of the United States, and was chosen by the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR) and its Bureau of Parks as one of "25 Must-See Pennsylvania State Parks".

Dissected plateau

dissecteddissect the plateaudissected plateaus
Cherry Springs, named for a large stand of Black Cherry trees in the park, is atop the dissected Allegheny Plateau at an elevation of 2300 ft. It is popular with astronomers and stargazers for having "some of the darkest night skies on the east coast" of the United States, and was chosen by the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR) and its Bureau of Parks as one of "25 Must-See Pennsylvania State Parks".

Allegheny Plateau

AlleghenyAllegany PlateauAllegheny Mountain section
Cherry Springs, named for a large stand of Black Cherry trees in the park, is atop the dissected Allegheny Plateau at an elevation of 2300 ft. It is popular with astronomers and stargazers for having "some of the darkest night skies on the east coast" of the United States, and was chosen by the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR) and its Bureau of Parks as one of "25 Must-See Pennsylvania State Parks".

Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources

Department of Conservation and Natural ResourcesOffice of Conservation SciencePennsylvania DCNR
Cherry Springs, named for a large stand of Black Cherry trees in the park, is atop the dissected Allegheny Plateau at an elevation of 2300 ft. It is popular with astronomers and stargazers for having "some of the darkest night skies on the east coast" of the United States, and was chosen by the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR) and its Bureau of Parks as one of "25 Must-See Pennsylvania State Parks".