The Chesapeake Bay – Landsat satellite image
The Chesapeake Bay – Landsat satellite image
Boundaries of the Chesapeake Bay impact crater.
Virginia's Historic Triangle
View of the Eastern Bay in Maryland at sunset
View of the Elizabeth River with Downtown Norfolk at top right. The carrier in the foreground is USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75).
The Chesapeake Bay Bridge, near Annapolis, Maryland
Hampton is a Hampton Roads community.
The Bay viewed from a plane
The harbor area of Hampton Roads, from official state map of pre-civil war Virginia circa 1858. image from the Library of Virginia
Food chain diagram for waterbirds of the Chesapeake Bay
Hampton Roads from space
Revised map of John White's original by Theodore DeBry. In this 1590 version, the Chesapeake Bay appears named for the first time.
Huntington Ingalls' Newport News Shipbuilding
Later (1630) version of the 1612 map by Captain John Smith during his exploration of the Chesapeake. The map is oriented with west at top.
NASA Langley Research Center
Oyster boats at war off the Maryland shore (1886 wood engraving). Regulation of the oyster beds in Virginia and Maryland has existed since the 19th century.
Lynnhaven Mall, opened in 1981, has 1400000 sqft and 180 stores.
Lighthouses and lightships such as Chesapeake have helped guide ships into the Bay.
MacArthur Center, opened in 1999, has 1100000 sqft and 140 stores.
Example Chesapeake Bay tides from Baltimore and the Chesapeake Bay Bridge–Tunnel for quarter and full moons during June 2013
Patrick Henry Mall, opened in 1987, has 714310 sqft and 120+ stores
A skipjack, part of the oystering fleet in Maryland
Ferry between Norfolk and Portsmouth
The Thomas Point Shoal Light in Maryland
A tugboat in Norfolk
Tidal wetlands of the Chesapeake Bay
I-64 on the Hampton Roads Beltway, north of I-264
Dead menhaden floating in the bay in 1973
Hampton Roads flag, adopted 1998
Dissolved oxygen levels (Milligrams per liter) required by various marine animals living in the Chesapeake Bay.
Hampton Roads viewed from an airplane
A cluster of oysters grown in a sanctuary
Crim Dell in the heart of William & Mary's wooded campus
Sediment sources in the Chesapeake Bay
Maryland Department of Natural Resources survey vessel tied up to a private dock with a continuous monitoring station.
Chesapeake Bay Interpretive Buoy System smart buoy on the Patapsco River.

Hampton Roads is the name of both a body of water that serves as a wide channel for the James, Nansemond and Elizabeth rivers between Old Point Comfort and Sewell's Point where the Chesapeake Bay flows into the Atlantic Ocean, and the surrounding metropolitan region located in the southeastern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina portions of the Tidewater region.

- Hampton Roads

The name may also refer to the Chesapeake people or the Chesepian, a Native American tribe who inhabited the area now known as South Hampton Roads in the U.S. state of Virginia.

- Chesapeake Bay
The Chesapeake Bay – Landsat satellite image

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Norfolk, Virginia

Independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States.

Independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States.

A cannonball lodged in the wall of St. Paul's Episcopal Church, fired by Lord Dunmore's fleet during the Revolutionary War
Norfolk, from Gosport, Virginia, New York Public Library
Joseph Jenkins Roberts, born and raised in Norfolk, became the first President of Liberia
Newport News, Hampton, Isle of Wight County, Suffolk, Chesapeake, Portsmouth and Norfolk, from space, July 1996. Norfolk is located in the upper-right quadrant; east is at the top.
Population density and elevation above sea level in Virginia. Norfolk is especially vulnerable to sea level rise.
Skyline of downtown Norfolk looking towards Elizabeth River
A home in the Ghent neighborhood
Taylor-Whittle House (c. 1790), now occupied by the Junior League of Norfolk-Virginia Beach and the Norfolk Historical Society
Norfolk skyline from across the Elizabeth River in 2016
Population age distribution for Norfolk
Norfolk, Virginia products treemap, 2020
1888 advertisement for the Market Square A&P
A view of Norfolk from Portsmouth
Dominion Square, headquarters of Dominion Enterprises
Nauticus and USS Wisconsin
Half Moone Cruise & Celebration Center
USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) arriving at Naval Station Norfolk
The Douglas MacArthur Statue
Nauticus (National Maritime Center)
Harrison Opera House
Harbor Park
Canal at the Norfolk Botanical Garden
Virginia Zoo
The Jones Institute for Reproductive Medicine at Eastern Virginia Medical School
Hampton Roads Transit bus at Sentara Norfolk General Hospital
Hampton Roads Bridge–Tunnel
Ferry to Portsmouth
Sentara Norfolk General Hospital

Norfolk is at the core of the metropolitan area, surrounding the Hampton Roads natural harbor at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay.

James River

The James, hidden by trees, at Percival's Island Riverwalk in Lynchburg, Virginia
James River at Huntington Park Beach in Newport News
Part of the James River Fleet

The James River is a river in the U.S. state of Virginia that begins in the Appalachian Mountains and flows 348 mi to Chesapeake Bay.

It flows into the Chesapeake Bay at Hampton Roads.

A portion of the Elizabeth River at Norfolk Naval Shipyard, at Portsmouth. The city of Portsmouth is on the left and Norfolk is on the right. USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) is heading downriver. View is to the north.

Elizabeth River (Virginia)

A portion of the Elizabeth River at Norfolk Naval Shipyard, at Portsmouth. The city of Portsmouth is on the left and Norfolk is on the right. USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) is heading downriver. View is to the north.

The Elizabeth River is a 6 mi tidal estuary forming an arm of Hampton Roads harbor at the southern end of Chesapeake Bay in southeast Virginia in the United States.

Virginia Beach, Virginia

Independent city located on the southeastern coast of the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States.

Independent city located on the southeastern coast of the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States.

A Chesepian home
Princess Anne County (1691–1963), now defunct, with Virginia Beach from 1895 Virginia map
Hotels along Atlantic Avenue, facing north
Virginia Beach Town Center
Overlooking the Atlantic Ocean
Virginia Beach from space
Map of racial distribution in Virginia Beach, 2010 U.S. Census. Each dot is 25 people:
A VF-41 F-4J over NAS Oceana in the late 1960s
Adam Thoroughgood House, before 1957 restoration
The Sandler Center located in Town Center, features performing arts, concerts, forums, and many other events.
A Japanese-style moon bridge in the Miyazaki Japanese Garden, Red Wing Park
People riding a rental surrey on the boardwalk
Local law prohibits the use of profanity along the boardwalk. This sign along Atlantic Avenue indicates this law.
The current building of Frank W. Cox High School
Association for Research and Enlightenment
A Hampton Roads Transit bus on Pacific Avenue in Virginia Beach.

Located on the Atlantic Ocean at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay, Virginia Beach is the largest city in the Hampton Roads metropolitan area.

Colony of Virginia

The first enduring English colony in North America, following failed proprietary attempts at settlement on Newfoundland by Sir Humphrey Gilbert in 1583, and the subsequent farther south Roanoke Island by Sir Walter Raleigh in the late 1580s.

The first enduring English colony in North America, following failed proprietary attempts at settlement on Newfoundland by Sir Humphrey Gilbert in 1583, and the subsequent farther south Roanoke Island by Sir Walter Raleigh in the late 1580s.

The site of the 1607 Popham Colony is shown by "Po" on the map. The settlement at Jamestown is shown by "J".
The 1609 charter for the Virginia colony "from sea to sea"
Map depicting the Colony of Virginia (according to the Second Charter), made by Willem Blaeu between 1609 and 1638
The Indian massacre of 1622, depicted in a 1628 woodcut by Matthäus Merian out of Theodore de Bry's workshop
Briefe Declaration of 1624
Red line showing the boundary between the Virginia Colony and Tributary Indian tribes, as established by the Treaty of 1646. The Red dot shows Jamestown, the capital of the Virginia Colony.
Lines showing the legal treaty frontiers between the Virginia Colony and Indian Nations in various years, as well as today's state boundaries. Red: Treaty of 1646. Green: Treaty of Albany (1684). Blue: Treaty of Albany (1722). Orange: Proclamation of 1763. Black: Treaty of Camp Charlotte (1774). Area west of this line in present-day Southwest Virginia was ceded by the Cherokee in 1775.
Map of the Iroquois expansion during the Beaver Wars, 1638–1711
Bermuda Hundred and other early English settlements upriver of Jamestown
Hanover County Courthouse (c. 1735–1742), with its arcaded front, is typical of a numerous colonial courthouse built in Virginia.
Rear view of the Wren Building at the College of William and Mary, begun in 1695

By the terms of the charter, the Plymouth Company was permitted to establish a colony of 100 mi square between the 38th parallel and the 45th parallel (roughly between Chesapeake Bay and the current U.S.–Canada border).

They sailed westward into the Bay and reached the mouth of Hampton Roads, stopping at a location now known as Old Point Comfort.

Clockwise from top:
Damage to the United States Capitol after the burning of Washington

Mortally wounded Isaac Brock spurs on the York Volunteers at the battle of Queenston Heights

USS Constitution vs HMS Guerriere

The death of Tecumseh in 1813

Andrew Jackson defeats the British assault on New Orleans in 1815

War of 1812

Conflict fought by the United States of America and its indigenous allies against the United Kingdom and its allies in British North America, with limited participation by Spain in Florida.

Conflict fought by the United States of America and its indigenous allies against the United Kingdom and its allies in British North America, with limited participation by Spain in Florida.

Clockwise from top:
Damage to the United States Capitol after the burning of Washington

Mortally wounded Isaac Brock spurs on the York Volunteers at the battle of Queenston Heights

USS Constitution vs HMS Guerriere

The death of Tecumseh in 1813

Andrew Jackson defeats the British assault on New Orleans in 1815
Upper and Lower Canada, circa 1812
Map showing the general distribution of Indian tribes in the Northwest Territory in the early 1790s
American expansion in the Indiana Territory
James Madison, the fourth President of the United States (1809–1817). Madison was the leader of the Democratic-Republican Party, whose power base came from southern and western states.
Depiction of a British private soldier (left) and officer (right) of the period
Governor General George Prévost was urged to maintain a defensive strategy as British forces were already preoccupied with the Napoleonic Wars.
Northern theatre, War of 1812
American surrender of Detroit, August 1812
Oliver Hazard Perry's message to William Henry Harrison after the Battle of Lake Erie began as such: "We have met the enemy and they are ours".
Laura Secord providing advance warning to James FitzGibbon, which led to a British-Iroquois victory at the Battle of Beaver Dams, June 1813
Fencibles, militia, and Mohawks repel an American attack on Montreal, Battle of the Chateauguay, October 1813
American infantry prepare to attack during the Battle of Lundy's Lane
Unsuccessful British assault on Fort Erie, 14 August 1814
Defeat at Plattsburgh led Prévost to call off the invasion of New York.
The Upper Mississippi River during the War of 1812:
The Royal Navy's North American squadron was based in Halifax, Nova Scotia and Bermuda. At the start of the war, the squadron had one ship of the line, seven frigates, nine sloops as well as brigs and schooners.
USS Constitution defeats in a single-ship engagement. The battle was an important victory for American morale.
Captain Broke leads the boarding party to USS Chesapeake (1799). The British capture of Chesapeake was one of the bloodiest contests in the age of sail.
The Battle of Valparaíso ended the American naval threat to British interests in the south Pacific Ocean.
The capture of USS President was the last naval duel to take place during the conflict, with its combatants unaware of the signing of the Treaty of Ghent several weeks prior.
Marines aboard USS Wasp (1814) engage, June 1814. During the war, sloops of the United States Navy scored several victories against British sloops.
Baltimore Clippers were a series of schooners used by American privateers during the war.
A map of the American coastline. British naval strategy was to protect their shipping in North America and enforce a naval blockade on the United States.
The only known photograph of a Black Refugee, c. 1890. During the war, a number of African Americans slaves escaped aboard British ships, settling in Canada (mainly in Nova Scotia) or Trinidad.
Map of the Chesapeake Campaign
Admiralty House, at Mount Wyndham, Bermuda, where the Chesapeake campaign was planned
An artist's rendering of the bombardment at Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore. Watching the bombardment from a truce ship, Francis Scott Key was inspired to write the four-stanza poem that later became "The Star-Spangled Banner".
In 1813, Creek warriors attacked Fort Mims and killed 400 to 500 people. The massacre became a rallying point for Americans.
Creek forces were defeated at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend, bringing an end to the Creek War.
American forces repelled a British assault on New Orleans in January 1815. The battle occurred before news of a peace treaty reached the United States.
A political caricature of delegates from the Hartford Convention deciding whether to leap into the hands of the British, December 1814. The convention led to widespread fears that the New England states might attempt to secede from the United States.
Depiction of the signing of the Treaty of Ghent, which formally ended the war between the British Empire and the United States
United States per capita GDP 1810–1815 in constant 2009 dollars
The Royal Naval Dockyard, Bermuda
Fort Henry at Kingston in 1836. Built from 1832 to 1836, the fort was one of several works undertaken to improve the colonies' defences.
Independence Day celebrations in 1819. In the United States, the war was followed by the Era of Good Feelings, a period that saw nationalism and a desire for national unity rise throughout the country.

The blockading British fleet in the Chesapeake Bay received increasing numbers of freed slaves during 1813.

Starting in March a squadron under Rear Admiral George Cockburn started a blockade of the mouth of the Bay at Hampton Roads harbour and raided towns along the Bay from Norfolk, Virginia to Havre de Grace, Maryland.

Yorktown, Virginia

Census-designated place in York County, Virginia, United States.

Census-designated place in York County, Virginia, United States.

Surrender of Lord Cornwallis at Yorktown in 1781. (Painting by John Trumbull)
The Somerwell House (c.1700) on Main Street.
Monument at Yorktown, celebrating victory in the American Revolutionary War. Installed 1884.
Coleman Bridge to Gloucester Point, Virginia, viewed from Yorktown Beach.
Moore House

When waterways were critical to transportation, Yorktown was thought to occupy a strategic location controlling upstream portions of the York River and its tributaries and their access to the Chesapeake Bay.

Hampton Roads Magazine is a bi-monthly regional magazine for Yorktown and the Hampton Roads area.

Coming down from the high-level portion near the north end

Chesapeake Bay Bridge–Tunnel

Coming down from the high-level portion near the north end
Aerial view of the Virginia Beach entrance to the bridge
View south entering the Thimble Shoal Channel Tunnel
Cargo ships line up to cross the bridge–tunnel complex at night
Info sign at the rest area with map of new bridge
View south exiting the Chesapeake Channel Tunnel
One of the artificial islands making up part of the bridge–tunnel complex, seen from the air
Sea Gull Pier on South Thimble Island, 2007

The Chesapeake Bay Bridge–Tunnel (CBBT, officially the Lucius J. Kellam Jr. Bridge–Tunnel) is a 17.6 mi bridge–tunnel that crosses the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay between Delmarva and Hampton Roads in the U.S. state of Virginia.