Chesapeake Bay

The Chesapeake Bay – Landsat satellite image
The Chesapeake Bay – Landsat satellite image
Boundaries of the Chesapeake Bay impact crater.
View of the Eastern Bay in Maryland at sunset
The Chesapeake Bay Bridge, near Annapolis, Maryland
The Bay viewed from a plane
Food chain diagram for waterbirds of the Chesapeake Bay
Revised map of John White's original by Theodore DeBry. In this 1590 version, the Chesapeake Bay appears named for the first time.
Later (1630) version of the 1612 map by Captain John Smith during his exploration of the Chesapeake. The map is oriented with west at top.
Oyster boats at war off the Maryland shore (1886 wood engraving). Regulation of the oyster beds in Virginia and Maryland has existed since the 19th century.
Lighthouses and lightships such as Chesapeake have helped guide ships into the Bay.
Example Chesapeake Bay tides from Baltimore and the Chesapeake Bay Bridge–Tunnel for quarter and full moons during June 2013
A skipjack, part of the oystering fleet in Maryland
The Thomas Point Shoal Light in Maryland
Tidal wetlands of the Chesapeake Bay
Dead menhaden floating in the bay in 1973
Dissolved oxygen levels (Milligrams per liter) required by various marine animals living in the Chesapeake Bay.
A cluster of oysters grown in a sanctuary
Sediment sources in the Chesapeake Bay
Maryland Department of Natural Resources survey vessel tied up to a private dock with a continuous monitoring station.
Chesapeake Bay Interpretive Buoy System smart buoy on the Patapsco River.

Largest estuary in the United States.

- Chesapeake Bay
The Chesapeake Bay – Landsat satellite image

124 related topics

Alpha

Captain John Smith Admiral of New England (1624)

John Smith (explorer)

English soldier, explorer, colonial governor, Admiral of New England, and author.

English soldier, explorer, colonial governor, Admiral of New England, and author.

Captain John Smith Admiral of New England (1624)
Window in St Helena's Church, Willoughby, displaying Smith's coat of arms
Statue at Historic Jamestowne
Inside a longhouse with Chief Powhatan (detail of John Smith map, 1612)
John Smith taking the King of Pamunkey prisoner (1624 history)
Smith's 1616 Map of New England
Title page of A Description of New England (1616)
Capt. John Smith Monument as it appeared c. 1914, Isles of Shoals
1624 John Smith's The Generall Historie of Virginia
The Generall Historie of Virginia, New-England, and the Summer Isles by Capt. John Smith, 1624
Smith's 1624 map of the Somers Isles (Bermuda) showing St. George's Town and related fortifications, including the Castle Islands Fortifications
Smith's map of Virginia from The Generall Historie of Virginia, New-England, and the Summer Isles, 1624

He was a leader of the Virginia Colony between September 1608 and August 1609, and he led an exploration along the rivers of Virginia and the Chesapeake Bay, during which he became the first English explorer to map the Chesapeake Bay area.

A map of Kent Island from 1970

Kent Island (Maryland)

A map of Kent Island from 1970
Love Point Road (viewed from Old Cockey Lane) in Historic Stevensville
Stevensville Train Depot
The Chesapeake Bay Bridge

Kent Island is the largest island in the Chesapeake Bay and a historic place in Maryland.

James River

The James, hidden by trees, at Percival's Island Riverwalk in Lynchburg, Virginia
James River at Huntington Park Beach in Newport News
Part of the James River Fleet

The James River is a river in the U.S. state of Virginia that begins in the Appalachian Mountains and flows 348 mi to Chesapeake Bay.

Patuxent River

The Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
Aerial photograph of the Patuxent River forming the boundary of Calvert County (foreground) and Prince George's County

The Patuxent River is a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay in the state of Maryland.

Coming down from the high-level portion near the north end

Chesapeake Bay Bridge–Tunnel

Coming down from the high-level portion near the north end
Aerial view of the Virginia Beach entrance to the bridge
View south entering the Thimble Shoal Channel Tunnel
Cargo ships line up to cross the bridge–tunnel complex at night
Info sign at the rest area with map of new bridge
View south exiting the Chesapeake Channel Tunnel
One of the artificial islands making up part of the bridge–tunnel complex, seen from the air
Sea Gull Pier on South Thimble Island, 2007

The Chesapeake Bay Bridge–Tunnel (CBBT, officially the Lucius J. Kellam Jr. Bridge–Tunnel) is a 17.6 mi bridge–tunnel that crosses the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay between Delmarva and Hampton Roads in the U.S. state of Virginia.

Joshua Barney

American Navy officer who served in the Continental Navy during the Revolutionary War.

American Navy officer who served in the Continental Navy during the Revolutionary War.

He then cruised in the Caribbean between Havana and Chesapeake Bay, returning to Cap-Français on 17 October.

Burning of Washington, Paul de Thoyras

Burning of Washington

British invasion of Washington City , the capital of the United States, during the Chesapeake Campaign of the War of 1812.

British invasion of Washington City , the capital of the United States, during the Chesapeake Campaign of the War of 1812.

Burning of Washington, Paul de Thoyras
British and American movements during the Chesapeake Campaign 1814
Admiralty House, Mount Wyndham, Bermuda, where the attack was planned
Burning of Washington, August 1814
The United States Capitol after the burning of Washington, D.C. in the War of 1812. Watercolor and ink depiction from 1814, restored.
The White House ruins after the conflagration of August 24, 1814. Watercolor by George Munger, displayed at the White House.
Major-General Robert Ross, British commander who led the attack on Washington
Portrait of Admiral Cockburn at the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, with Washington burning in the background. The U.S. Capitol and Treasury Building are at far right.
The US Treasury Building (built 1804)
The Blodget Hotel which housed the US Patent Office; spared during the burning of Washington in 1814. The Patent Office later burned in 1836.
The Washington Navy Yard in 1862
The Old Brick Capitol serving as a prison during the Civil War

Rear Admiral George Cockburn had commanded the squadron in Chesapeake Bay since the previous year.

Chesapeake Bay Flotilla

U.S. Marines alongside sailors manning the cannons on August 23, 1814 at Bladensburg, from the Washington Navy Yard were attached to the Chesapeake Bay Flotilla to protect the flank of the naval force
Charles Ball wearing the uniform of the Chesapeake Bay Flotilla.
U.S. Navy Honor Guard salute during August 23, 2014 dedication of official Battle Of Bladensburg Memorial by the State of Maryland, with the bronze relief sculpture showing a wounded Commodore Joshua Barney fighting alongside an unidentified marine and Flotilla sailor, Charles Ball

The Chesapeake Bay Flotilla was a motley collection of barges and gunboats that the United States assembled under the command of Joshua Barney, an 1812 privateer captain, to stall British attacks in the Chesapeake Bay which came to be known as the "Chesapeake Campaign" during the War of 1812.

Clancy at Boston College's Burns Library in November 1989

Tom Clancy

American novelist.

American novelist.

Clancy at Boston College's Burns Library in November 1989

It has a panoramic view of the Chesapeake Bay.

Eastern oyster

Species of true oyster native to eastern North and South America.

Species of true oyster native to eastern North and South America.

Side
Outside
Inside
Cluster of oysters
Oysters growing on a post

Other names in local or culinary use include the Wellfleet oyster, Virginia oyster, Malpeque oyster, Blue Point oyster, Chesapeake Bay oyster, and Apalachicola oyster.