A report on Esophagus and Chest pain

The digestive tract, with the esophagus marked in red
Potential location of pain from a heart attack
The esophagus is constricted in three places.
A blockage of coronary arteries can lead to a heart attack
A mass seen during an endoscopy and an ultrasound of the mass conducted during the endoscopy session.
Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a common cause of chest pain in adults

Diseases may cause difficulty swallowing (dysphagia), painful swallowing (odynophagia), chest pain, or cause no symptoms at all.

- Esophagus

Achalasia, nutcracker esophagus, and other motility disorders of the esophagus

- Chest pain
The digestive tract, with the esophagus marked in red

5 related topics with Alpha

Overall

A chest X-ray showing achalasia ( arrows point to the outline of the massively dilated esophagus )

Esophageal achalasia

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A chest X-ray showing achalasia ( arrows point to the outline of the massively dilated esophagus )
Transhiatal oesophagectomy specimen from a patient suffering from late-stage achalasia. Diverticulum at the left lower end of the oesophagus.
An axial CT image showing marked dilatation of the esophagus in a person with achalasia.
"Bird's beak" appearance and "megaesophagus", typical in achalasia.
Schematic of manometry in achalasia showing aperistaltic contractions, increased intraesophageal pressure, and failure of relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter.
Image of a stomach which has undergone Fundoplomy

Esophageal achalasia, often referred to simply as achalasia, is a failure of smooth muscle fibers to relax, which can cause the lower esophageal sphincter to remain closed.

Achalasia is characterized by difficulty in swallowing, regurgitation, and sometimes chest pain.

Normal peristalsis in time space graph. Nutcracker esophagus shows higher amplitude contractions (Z-axis) that take longer to pass (X-axis)

Nutcracker esophagus

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Normal peristalsis in time space graph. Nutcracker esophagus shows higher amplitude contractions (Z-axis) that take longer to pass (X-axis)
Diagram of esophageal motility study in nutcracker esophagus: The disorder shows peristalsis with high-pressure esophageal contractions exceeding 180 mmHg and contractile waves with a long duration exceeding 6 sec.
Normal esophagus in (A). Nutcracker esophagus in (C): high-pressure waves in blue; cross-sectional areas (CSA) in fucsia.

Nutcracker esophagus, Jackhammer esophagus, or hypercontractile peristalsis, is a disorder of the movement of the esophagus characterized by contractions in the smooth muscle of the esophagus in a normal sequence but at an excessive amplitude or duration.

It causes difficulty swallowing, or dysphagia, to both solid and liquid foods, and can cause significant chest pain; it may also be asymptomatic.

X-ray showing radiocontrast from the stomach (white material below diaphragm) entering the esophagus (three vertical collections of white material in the mid-line of the chest) due to severe reflux

Gastroesophageal reflux disease

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X-ray showing radiocontrast from the stomach (white material below diaphragm) entering the esophagus (three vertical collections of white material in the mid-line of the chest) due to severe reflux
Frontal view of severe tooth erosion in GERD.
Severe tooth erosion in GERD.
A comparison of a healthy condition to GERD
Endoscopic image of peptic stricture, or narrowing of the esophagus near the junction with the stomach: This is a complication of chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease and can be a cause of dysphagia or difficulty swallowing.

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is a chronic condition in which stomach contents and acid rise up into the esophagus, resulting in symptoms and/or complications.

Symptoms include the taste of acid in the back of the mouth, heartburn, bad breath, chest pain, regurgitation, breathing problems, and wearing away of the teeth.

Heart

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Muscular organ in most animals.

Muscular organ in most animals.

Human heart during an autopsy
Computer-generated animation of a beating human heart
The human heart is in the middle of the thorax, with its apex pointing to the left.
Heart being dissected showing right and left ventricles, from above
Frontal section showing papillary muscles attached to the tricuspid valve on the right and to the mitral valve on the left via chordae tendineae.
Layers of the heart wall, including visceral and parietal pericardium
The swirling pattern of myocardium helps the heart pump effectively
Arterial supply to the heart (red), with other areas labelled (blue).
Autonomic innervation of the heart
Development of the human heart during the first eight weeks (top) and the formation of the heart chambers (bottom). In this figure, the blue and red colors represent blood inflow and outflow (not venous and arterial blood). Initially, all venous blood flows from the tail/atria to the ventricles/head, a very different pattern from that of an adult.
Blood flow through the valves
The cardiac cycle as correlated to the ECG
The x-axis reflects time with a recording of the heart sounds. The y-axis represents pressure.
Transmission of a cardiac action potential through the heart's conduction system
Conduction system of the heart
The prepotential is due to a slow influx of sodium ions until the threshold is reached followed by a rapid depolarization and repolarization. The prepotential accounts for the membrane reaching threshold and initiates the spontaneous depolarization and contraction of the cell; there is no resting potential.
3D echocardiogram showing the mitral valve (right), tricuspid and mitral valves (top left) and aortic valve (top right).
The closure of the heart valves causes the heart sounds.
Cardiac cycle shown against ECG
Heart and its blood vessels, by Leonardo da Vinci, 15th century
Animated heart
Elize Ryd making a heart sign at a concert in 2018
The tube-like heart (green) of the mosquito Anopheles gambiae extends horizontally across the body, interlinked with the diamond-shaped wing muscles (also green) and surrounded by pericardial cells (red). Blue depicts cell nuclei.
Basic arthropod body structure – heart shown in red
The human heart viewed from the front
The human heart viewed from behind
The coronary circulation
The human heart viewed from the front and from behind
Frontal section of the human heart
An anatomical specimen of the heart
Heart illustration with circulatory system
Animated Heart 3d Model Rendered in Computer

Cardiovascular diseases frequently do not have symptoms or may cause chest pain or shortness of breath.

Echocardiography can be conducted by a probe on the chest (transthoracic), or by a probe in the esophagus (transesophageal).

Diffuse esophageal spasm

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Corkscrew appearance of the esophagus.

Diffuse esophageal spasm (DES), also known as distal esophageal spasm, is a condition characterized by uncoordinated contractions of the esophagus, which may cause difficulty swallowing (dysphagia) or regurgitation.

In some cases, it may cause symptoms such as chest pain, similar to heart disease.