Cheyenne language

Cheyennechy
The Cheyenne language (Tsėhésenėstsestȯtse), is the Native American language spoken by the Cheyenne people, predominantly in present-day Montana and Oklahoma, in the United States.wikipedia
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Cheyenne

CheyennesCheyenne IndiansCheyenne people
The Cheyenne language (Tsėhésenėstsestȯtse), is the Native American language spoken by the Cheyenne people, predominantly in present-day Montana and Oklahoma, in the United States.
The Cheyenne of Montana and Oklahoma speak the Cheyenne language, known as Tsêhésenêstsestôtse (common spelling: Tsisinstsistots).

Algonquian languages

AlgonquianAlgonquian languageAlgonquin
It is part of the Algonquian language family. Cheyenne is one of the Algonquian languages, which is a sub-category of the Algic languages.

Lame Deer, Montana

Lame Deer Lame Deer
Classes in the Cheyenne language are available at Chief Dull Knife College in Lame Deer, Montana, at Southwestern Oklahoma State University, and at Watonga High School in Watonga, Oklahoma.
Lame Deer (Meaveʼhoʼeno in Cheyenne ) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Rosebud County, Montana.

Blackfoot language

BlackfootblaBlackfeet
However, Plains Algonquian, which also includes Arapaho and Blackfoot, is an areal rather than genetic subgrouping.
Blackfoot is a member of the Algonquian language belonging to the Plains areal grouping along with Arapaho, Gros Ventre, and Cheyenne.

Plains Algonquian languages

Plains AlgonquianPlainsAlgonquian family
Specifically, it is a Plains Algonquian language.
For example, Proto-Algonquian *keriwa, "eagle", becomes Cheyenne netse; Proto-Algonquian *weθali, "her husband", becomes Arapaho ííx, *nepyi, "water" becomes Gros Ventre níc, *wa·poswa, "hare" becomes Arapaho nóóku, *maθkwa, "bear" becomes Arapaho wox, and *sakime·wa, "fly" becomes Arapaho noubee.

Montana

MTState of MontanaMontana, USA
The Cheyenne language (Tsėhésenėstsestȯtse), is the Native American language spoken by the Cheyenne people, predominantly in present-day Montana and Oklahoma, in the United States. Cheyenne is spoken on the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation in Montana and in Oklahoma.

Tone (linguistics)

tonetonal languagetones
Cheyenne has three basic vowel qualities ([e a o]) that take four tones: high tone as in á [á]); low tone as in a [à]; mid tone as in ā [ā]; and rising tone as in ô [ǒ].
One variety of Hopi has developed tone, as has the Cheyenne language.

Vowel

vowelsvowel heightV
Cheyenne has three basic vowel qualities ([e a o]) that take four tones: high tone as in á [á]); low tone as in a [à]; mid tone as in ā [ā]; and rising tone as in ô [ǒ].
Most languages have only voiced vowels, but several Native American languages, such as Cheyenne and Totonac, contrast voiced and devoiced vowels.

Voicelessness

voicelessvoiceless consonantunvoiced
Vowels can also be voiceless (e.g. ė [e̥]).
Voiceless vowels are also an areal feature in languages of the American Southwest (like Hopi and Keres), the Great Basin (including all Numic languages), and the Great Plains, where they are present in Numic Comanche but also in Algonquian Cheyenne, and the Caddoan language Arikara.

Native Americans in the United States

Native AmericanNative AmericansAmerican Indian
The Cheyenne language (Tsėhésenėstsestȯtse), is the Native American language spoken by the Cheyenne people, predominantly in present-day Montana and Oklahoma, in the United States.

Oklahoma

OKState of OklahomaOklahoma, USA
The Cheyenne language (Tsėhésenėstsestȯtse), is the Native American language spoken by the Cheyenne people, predominantly in present-day Montana and Oklahoma, in the United States. Cheyenne is spoken on the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation in Montana and in Oklahoma.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
The Cheyenne language (Tsėhésenėstsestȯtse), is the Native American language spoken by the Cheyenne people, predominantly in present-day Montana and Oklahoma, in the United States.

Agglutination

agglutinativeagglutinatedagglutinate
Like all other Algonquian languages, it has complex agglutinative morphology.

Morphology (linguistics)

morphologymorphologicalmorphologically
Like all other Algonquian languages, it has complex agglutinative morphology.

Algic languages

AlgicAlgic language familyAlgic family
Cheyenne is one of the Algonquian languages, which is a sub-category of the Algic languages.

Arapaho language

ArapahoArapaho properBesawunena
However, Plains Algonquian, which also includes Arapaho and Blackfoot, is an areal rather than genetic subgrouping.

Sprachbund

linguistic arealanguage areaareal
However, Plains Algonquian, which also includes Arapaho and Blackfoot, is an areal rather than genetic subgrouping.

Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation

Northern CheyenneNorthern Cheyenne ReservationNorthern Cheyenne Tribe
Cheyenne is spoken on the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation in Montana and in Oklahoma.

Endangered language

endangeredmoribundendangered languages
The Cheyenne language is considered "definitely endangered" in Montana and "critically endangered" in Oklahoma by the UNESCO.

UNESCO

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural OrganizationUnited Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural OrganizationUnited Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)
The Cheyenne language is considered "definitely endangered" in Montana and "critically endangered" in Oklahoma by the UNESCO.

Hostiles (film)

HostilesHostiles'' (film)
The 2017 film Hostiles features extensive dialogue in Northern Cheyenne.

Chief Dull Knife College

Dull Knife Memorial College
Classes in the Cheyenne language are available at Chief Dull Knife College in Lame Deer, Montana, at Southwestern Oklahoma State University, and at Watonga High School in Watonga, Oklahoma. In 1997, the Cultural Affairs Department of Chief Dull Knife College applied to the Administration for Native Americans for an approximately $50,000 language preservation planning grant.

Grant (money)

grantsgrantresearch grant
In 1997, the Cultural Affairs Department of Chief Dull Knife College applied to the Administration for Native Americans for an approximately $50,000 language preservation planning grant.

Curriculum

curriculacore curriculumcore
Following this, the department wanted to use the compiled data to establish long-term community language goals, and to prepare Chief Dull Knife College to implement a Cheyenne Language Center and curriculum guide.

Language immersion

immersionimmersion schoolimmersion program
In 2015, the Chief Dull Knife College sponsored the 18th Annual Language Immersion Camp.