Chhinnamasta

ChinnamastaMata Chhinmastika
Chhinnamasta (छिन्नमस्ता, "She whose head is severed"), often spelled Chinnamasta, and also called Ch(h)innamastika and Prachanda Chandika, is a Hindu goddess.wikipedia
185 Related Articles

Blood squirt

blood spatterblood gushblood spurt
Three jets of blood spurt out of her bleeding neck and are drunk by her severed head and two attendants.
Chinnamasta, a self-decapitated Hindu goddess, is depicted holding her head with three jets of blood spurting out of her bleeding neck, which are drunk by her severed head and two attendants.

Shaktism

ShaktaSaktaSaktism
Chhinnamasta is worshipped in the Kalikula sect of Shaktism, the Goddess-centric tradition of Hinduism.
The rarer forms of Devi found among tantric Shakta are the Mahavidyas, particularly Tara, Bhairavi, Chhinnamasta, Kamala and Bhuvaneshvari.

Parvati

ParvathiUmaGoddess Parvati
She is one of the Mahavidyas or Shivasakthi or Parvati, ten goddesses from the esoteric tradition of Tantra, and a ferocious aspect of Devi, the Hindu Mother goddess.
* Dasa Mahavidya, the ten tantric manifestations of Devi: Mahakali, Tara, Tripura Sundari, Bhuvaneshwari, Bhairavi, Bagalamukhi, Dhumavati, Chinnamasta, Matangi, Kamala.

Vajrayogini

VajrayoginīVajra YoginiVajrayogini Hall
Chhinnamasta is closely related to Chinnamunda – the severed-headed form of the Tibetan Buddhist goddess Vajrayogini.Those who worship Chinnamasta will be free from the effects of Rahu as per Shaktism. The Hindu Chhinnamasta appears as a significant deity in Tantric and Tibetan Buddhism, where she is called Chinnamunda ("she with the severed head") or Trikaya-vajrayogini ("triple-bodied Vajrayogini").
The severed-headed form of Vajrayoginī is similar to the Indian goddess Chinnamasta, who is recognized by both Hindus and Buddhists.

Chinnamunda

Chhinnamasta is closely related to Chinnamunda – the severed-headed form of the Tibetan Buddhist goddess Vajrayogini.Those who worship Chinnamasta will be free from the effects of Rahu as per Shaktism. The Hindu Chhinnamasta appears as a significant deity in Tantric and Tibetan Buddhism, where she is called Chinnamunda ("she with the severed head") or Trikaya-vajrayogini ("triple-bodied Vajrayogini").
Her attributes and iconography are similar to those of the Hindu goddess Chhinnamasta.

Shakambhari

SakambhariSambhar, RajasthanShakambari
The Devi Bhagavata Purana also mentions the Mahavidyas as war-companions and forms of the goddess Shakambhari.
At this moment, came out of the body of the Devi, the principal Shaktis (forces incarnate) named Kali, Tarini, Tripura Sundari, Bhuvaneshwari, Bhairavi, Chinnamasta, Dhumavati, Bagalamukhi, Matangi and Kamalatmika.

Mekhala and Kanakhala

Mekhala
One tale tells of Krishnacharya's disciples, two Mahasiddha ("great perfected ones") sisters, Mekhala and Kanakhala, who cut their heads, offered them to their guru, and then danced.
This form is almost identical to the Hindu goddess Chhinnamasta, who is standing on a copulating couple.

Devi

Hindu goddessgoddessDevī
She is one of the Mahavidyas or Shivasakthi or Parvati, ten goddesses from the esoteric tradition of Tantra, and a ferocious aspect of Devi, the Hindu Mother goddess.
The ten aspects of her, also called Mahavidyas (or great forms of her knowledge) are forms of Parvati and they are: Kali, Tara, Tripura Sundari, Bhairavi, Bhuvanesvari, Chhinnamasta, Dhumavati, Bagalamukhi, Matangi and Kamala.

Mundamala

garland of skullsgarland of human headsgarland of human skulls
Chhinnamasta is depicted wearing a serpent as the sacred thread and a mundamala (garland of skulls or severed heads and bones), along with other various gold or pearl ornaments around her neck.
Other Mahavidyas like Tara, Chhinnamasta, Bhairavi, Dhumavati and Matangi are depicted or at least described wearing mundamalas; the goddess may also hold a severed head or skull (kapala) in her hand.

Kapala

skullcupskull-cupkapāla
The goddess carries her own severed head – sometimes on a platter or in a skull-bowl – in her left hand.
Some deities such as the Hindu Chinnamasta and the related Buddhist Vajrayogini are depicted as drinking blood from the kapala.

Chhinnamasta Temple

Another important shrine is the Chhinnamasta Temple near Rajrappa in Jharkhand, where a natural rock covered with an ashtadhatu (eight-metal alloy) kavacha (cover) is worshipped as the goddess.
Chhinnamasta Temple dedicated to Goddess Chinnamasta is a hindu pilgrimage centre and located in Rajrappa, in Ramgarh district of Jharkhand.

Cephalophore

cephalophorescarry their own severed headspicked up his head
The decapitated body and head motif is not unique to Hinduism and Buddhism and appears across the world, including the Cephalophore saints of Christianity and in Celtic culture.

Chintpurni

Chintpurni Devi TempleChintpurni Mata Mandir
The Chintpurni ("She who fulfills one's wishes"), Himachal Pradesh temple of Chhinnamastika, is one of the Shakti Peethas (considered the holiest goddess temples) and is where the goddess Sati's forehead (mastaka) fell.
The Chintpurni Shakti Peeth houses the temple of Chinnamastika Devi or Chinnamasta Devi.

Kamakhya Temple

KamakhyaKamakhya temple complexKamakshya
Her shrines are also situated in the Kamakhya Temple complex, Assam and Basukinath temple complex, Jharkhand along with other Mahavidyas.
It is one of the oldest of the 51 Shakti Pitha s. Situated on the Nilachal Hill in western part of Guwahati city in Assam, India, it is the main temple in a complex of individual temples dedicated to the ten Mahavidyas of Saktism : Kali, Tara, Sodashi, Bhuvaneshwari, Bhairavi, Chhinnamasta, Dhumavati, Bagalamukhi, Matangi and Kamalatmika.

Rati

RathiKamaratihDewi Ratih
With her right leg held straight and her left leg bent a little (the pratyalidha stance), Chhinnamasta stands in a fighting posture on the love-deity couple of Kamadeva (Kama) – a symbol of sexual love/lust – and his wife Rati, who are engaged in copulation with the latter usually on the top (viparita-rati sex position).
In Tantra, the Mahavidya goddess Chhinnamasta is depicted severing her own head and standing on the copulating couple of Kama and Rati, with the latter on top, (viparita-rati sex position).

Mahavidya

MahavidyasDasha-MahavidyasDasa Mahavidya
She is one of the Mahavidyas or Shivasakthi or Parvati, ten goddesses from the esoteric tradition of Tantra, and a ferocious aspect of Devi, the Hindu Mother goddess.
The 10 Mahavidyas are Kali, Tara, Tripura Sundari, Bhuvaneshvari, Bhairavi, Chhinnamasta, Dhumavati, Bagalamukhi, Matangi and Kamala.

Rajrappa

Another important shrine is the Chhinnamasta Temple near Rajrappa in Jharkhand, where a natural rock covered with an ashtadhatu (eight-metal alloy) kavacha (cover) is worshipped as the goddess.
The main attraction of the Chhinnamasta (also known as Chinnamastika) temple located here is the headless deity of goddess Chinnamasta which stands on the body of Kamdev and Rati in the lotus bed.

Hinduism

HinduHindusHindu culture
Chhinnamasta (छिन्नमस्ता, "She whose head is severed"), often spelled Chinnamasta, and also called Ch(h)innamastika and Prachanda Chandika, is a Hindu goddess.

Maithuna

mithunacopulating coupleIndian tantric practices
With her right leg held straight and her left leg bent a little (the pratyalidha stance), Chhinnamasta stands in a fighting posture on the love-deity couple of Kamadeva (Kama) – a symbol of sexual love/lust – and his wife Rati, who are engaged in copulation with the latter usually on the top (viparita-rati sex position). The self-decapitated nude goddess, usually standing or seated on a divine copulating couple, holds her own severed head in one hand, a scimitar in another.

Scimitar

Saifscimitarssword
The self-decapitated nude goddess, usually standing or seated on a divine copulating couple, holds her own severed head in one hand, a scimitar in another.

Kundalini

Kundalini energyKundalini syndromeawakened kundalini
The goddess conveys spiritual self-realization and the awakening of the kundalini – spiritual energy.

Altruistic suicide

self-sacrificeAgathusia and aschimothusiaaltruistic
The legends of Chhinnamasta emphasise her self-sacrifice – sometimes coupled with a maternal element – sexual essence, and self-destructive fury.

Rahu

RāhuRāhulaLo Hau
Chhinnamasta is closely related to Chinnamunda – the severed-headed form of the Tibetan Buddhist goddess Vajrayogini.Those who worship Chinnamasta will be free from the effects of Rahu as per Shaktism.

Vajrayana

Vajrayana BuddhismTantric Buddhismtantric
The Hindu Chhinnamasta appears as a significant deity in Tantric and Tibetan Buddhism, where she is called Chinnamunda ("she with the severed head") or Trikaya-vajrayogini ("triple-bodied Vajrayogini").

Tibetan Buddhism

Tibetan BuddhistTibetanTibetan Buddhists
Chhinnamasta is closely related to Chinnamunda – the severed-headed form of the Tibetan Buddhist goddess Vajrayogini.Those who worship Chinnamasta will be free from the effects of Rahu as per Shaktism. The Hindu Chhinnamasta appears as a significant deity in Tantric and Tibetan Buddhism, where she is called Chinnamunda ("she with the severed head") or Trikaya-vajrayogini ("triple-bodied Vajrayogini").