A report on Chicago and Chicago River

Traditional Potawatomi regalia on display at the Field Museum of Natural History
Aerial view of the North Branch of the Chicago River, from the south, with Goose Island, near center
An artist's rendering of the Great Chicago Fire of 1871
The Chicago 'L' Ravenswood train (Brown Line) crossing the north branch of the Chicago River
Court of Honor at the World's Columbian Exposition in 1893
View west along the main stem of the Chicago River from the Outer Drive Bridge, 2009
Men outside a soup kitchen during the Great Depression (1931)
The main stem of the river, Wrigley Building, and Tribune Tower at night.
Boy from Chicago, 1941
Kayakers take a break at Wolf Point with 333 West Wacker, Lake Street Bridge and the south skyline in the background
Protesters in Grant Park outside the 1968 Democratic National Convention
A view of the Chicago River from the South Branch, looking toward the main stem (right) and the North Branch (upper left) at Wolf Point
Downtown and the North Side with beaches lining the waterfront
South Branch at Ping Tom Memorial Park
A satellite image of Chicago
View from the U.S. Turning Basin towards the Chicago Loop
Community areas of the City of Chicago
Taylor street bridge Circa 1919
The Chicago Building (1904–05) is a prime example of the Chicago School, displaying both variations of the Chicago window.
Replica of Daniel Chester French's Statue of the Republic at the site of the World's Columbian Exposition
Passengers being rescued from the hull of the Eastland by the tugboat Kenosha in the Chicago River
Downtown Chicago and the Chicago River during January 2014 cold wave
State Street Bridge raised to allow boats to pass
Map of racial distribution in Chicago, 2010 U.S. Census. Each dot is 25 people:
The Link Bridge of Lake Shore Drive
Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago
The Chicago River dyed green for Saint Patrick’s Day
The Chicago Board of Trade Building
Near the mouth of the Chicago River 1831
The National Hellenic Museum in Greektown is one of several ethnic museums comprising the Chicago Cultural Alliance.
Near the mouth of the Chicago River 1838
A Chicago jazz club
Near the mouth of the Chicago River 1893
The Chicago Theatre
Near the mouth of the Chicago River c. late 1800s
The spire of the Copernicus Center is modeled on the Royal Castle in Warsaw.
Mouth of the river in the early 20th century
Jay Pritzker Pavilion by night
The river dyed green for Saint Patrick's Day in 2015
Ferries offer sightseeing tours and water-taxi transportation along the Chicago River and Lake Michigan.
The river dyed blue during the Chicago Cubs' 2016 World Series celebration
Aerial view of Navy Pier at night
The Magnificent Mile hosts numerous upscale stores, as well as landmarks like the Chicago Water Tower.
Chicago-style stuffed pizza
A Polish market in Chicago
Carl Sandburg's most famous description of the city is as "Hog Butcher for the World/Tool Maker, Stacker of Wheat/ Player with Railroads and the Nation's Freight Handler,/ Stormy, Husky, Brawling, City of the Big Shoulders."
Chicago Half Marathon on Lake Shore Drive on the South Side
Daley Plaza with Picasso statue, City Hall in background. At right, the Daley Plaza Building contains the state law courts.
Chicago Police Department SUV, 2011
When it was opened in 1991, the central Harold Washington Library appeared in Guinness World Records as the largest municipal public library building in the world.
The University of Chicago, as seen from the Midway Plaisance
WGN began in the early days of radio and developed into a multi-platform broadcaster, including a cable television super-station.
The former Harpo Studios in West Loop, Chicago was home of The Oprah Winfrey Show from 1986 until 2011 and other Harpo Production operations until 2015.
Aerial photo of the Jane Byrne Interchange, opened in the 1960s
Chicago Union Station, opened in 1925, is the third-busiest passenger rail terminal in the United States.
Amtrak train on the Empire Builder route departs Chicago from Union Station
O'Hare International Airport
Prentice Women's Hospital on the Northwestern Memorial Hospital Downtown Campus

The Chicago River is a system of rivers and canals with a combined length of 156 mi that runs through the city of Chicago, including its center (the Chicago Loop).

- Chicago River

While elevating Chicago, and at first improving the city's health, the untreated sewage and industrial waste now flowed into the Chicago River, and subsequently into Lake Michigan, polluting the city's primary freshwater source.

- Chicago

17 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Chicago Loop

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In 1900
Willis Tower, formerly Sears Tower, is the third tallest building in the Western Hemisphere.
East Monroe Street
View of the Chicago 'L' tracks, 35 East Wacker, and Trump International Hotel and Tower
The northwest corner of the CTA Loop, which was once the busiest railroad junction in the world.
A sign commemorating the terminus of Route 66
The Chicago River is the south border of the Near North Side (right) and the north border of the Loop; the Loop's Near East Side is to the left in this picture.

The Loop, one of Chicago's 77 designated community areas, is the central business district of the city and is the main section of Downtown Chicago.

The Loop community area is bounded on the north and west by the Chicago River, on the east by Lake Michigan, and on the south by Roosevelt Road, although the commercial core has greatly expanded into adjacent community areas.

a scene at Seneca, Illinois

Illinois and Michigan Canal

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The Illinois and Michigan Canal connected the Great Lakes to the Mississippi River and the Gulf of Mexico.

The Illinois and Michigan Canal connected the Great Lakes to the Mississippi River and the Gulf of Mexico.

a scene at Seneca, Illinois
The location and course of the Illinois and Michigan Canal
New lock and dam structures that replaced the historic Illinois and Michigan Canal
Illinois and Michigan Canal west of Willow Springs, where the unused canal is clogged with fallen trees
Fox River Aqueduct in Ottawa, IL
Aux Sable Creek Aqueduct, Morris, IL
Locktenders House and lock at the Aux Sable Creek
Goose Lake Prairie F&WA, Morris, IL
Lock #3, Lockport, IL
Historic Route 66, Illinois Route 53, and I&M Canal overlap in Joliet, IL

In Illinois, it ran 96 mi from the Chicago River in Bridgeport, Chicago to the Illinois River at LaSalle-Peru.

1856 drawing showing Fort Dearborn as it appeared in 1831

Fort Dearborn

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1856 drawing showing Fort Dearborn as it appeared in 1831
Diagram of the first Fort Dearborn
Artist's rendering of a bird's-eye view of the original Fort Dearborn
The Kinzie Mansion. Fort Dearborn is in the background.
Fort Dearborn in 1850
Fort Dearborn in 1856
Fort Dearborn in 1853
Fort Dearborn 1808 layout
London Guarantee Building with large relief above the entrance commemorating Fort Dearborn
A plaque on Michigan avenue
A marker showing the fort's southern perimeter

Fort Dearborn was a United States fort built in 1803 beside the Chicago River, in what is now Chicago, Illinois.

Flag of Chicago

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The flag of Chicago consists of two light blue horizontal bars, or stripes, on a field of white, each bar one-sixth the height of the full flag, and placed slightly less than one-sixth of the way from the top and bottom.

The flag of Chicago consists of two light blue horizontal bars, or stripes, on a field of white, each bar one-sixth the height of the full flag, and placed slightly less than one-sixth of the way from the top and bottom.

History and meaning of the Chicago flag
Kitty Kelly holding Flag of Chicago from the Chicago Tribune, 1921. Note the two stars on the flag at the time.
Flag of Chicago (2015)
City of Chicago Flag, with the Star Spangled Banner and Illinois State Flag at its sides at Navy Pier
The Chicago PD's flag; adopted in April 1977.
The flag of NAVA Meeting 31, hosted in Chicago. NAVA meeting flags often incorporate elements to reflect the host city.
Sketches for the flag from a contest from 1892. This design ultimately became used in the municipal device.<ref>{{Cite web|url=https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-chicago-flag-origins-flag-day-htmlstory.html|title=Chicago's flag: The history of every star and every stripe|last=Marx|first=Kori Rumore and Ryan|website=Chicago Tribune|language=en-US|access-date=2019-04-07}}</ref>
Twenty-three other icons that were commissioned representing different city departments that could be placed on the flag for that department.<ref>{{Cite web|url=https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-chicago-flag-origins-flag-day-htmlstory.html|title=Chicago's flag: The history of every star and every stripe|last=Marx|first=Kori Rumore and Ryan|website=chicagotribune.com|language=en-US|access-date=2019-04-07}}</ref>
Chicago flag of 1917 poster, with "I Will" motto

The City of Chicago's flag was adopted in 1917 after the design by Wallace Rice won a City Council sponsored competition.

The top blue bar represents Lake Michigan and the North Branch of the Chicago River.

Satellite image of the Great Lakes, April 24, 2000

Great Lakes

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The Great Lakes, also called the Great Lakes of North America or the Laurentian Great Lakes, are a series of large interconnected freshwater lakes with certain sea-like characteristics in the mid-east region of North America that connect to the Atlantic Ocean via the Saint Lawrence River.

The Great Lakes, also called the Great Lakes of North America or the Laurentian Great Lakes, are a series of large interconnected freshwater lakes with certain sea-like characteristics in the mid-east region of North America that connect to the Atlantic Ocean via the Saint Lawrence River.

Satellite image of the Great Lakes, April 24, 2000
Terra MODIS image of the Great Lakes, January 27, 2005, showing ice beginning to build up around the shores of each of the lakes, with snow on the ground; Green Bay, the North Channel, Saginaw Bay, and Lake St. Clair show complete ice coverage.
Location in North America
A map of the Great Lakes Basin showing the five sub-basins. Left to right they are: Superior (magenta); Michigan (cyan); Huron (green); Erie (yellow); Ontario (orange-red).
Lake Michigan–Huron with north oriented to the right; taken on April 14, 2022 during Expedition 67 of the International Space Station. Green Bay is at the upper left and Saginaw Bay is on the right.
South Bass Island in Lake Erie
Toronto on Lake Ontario is in the eastern section of the Great Lakes Megalopolis
Water levels of Lakes Michigan and Huron in the United States, 1918 to 2019.
The Great Lakes, as photographed from the International Space Station
A diagram of the formation of the Great Lakes
Map of Glacial Lake Algonquin and its Correlatives (USGS 1915)
The location of common lake effect bands on the Great Lakes
Lake sturgeon, the largest native fish in the Great Lakes and the subject of extensive commercial fishing in the 19th and 20th centuries is listed as a threatened species
Cliffs at Palisade Head on Lake Superior in Minnesota near Silver Bay.
A zebra mussel–encrusted vector-averaging current meter from Lake Michigan.
Diatoms of different sizes seen through the microscope. These minuscule phytoplankton are encased within a silicate cell wall.
A woodcut of Le Griffon
The passenger ship (foreground) leaving Chicago, c. 1909
Photograph of Lakes Ontario, Erie and Huron plus the Finger Lakes of upstate New York, June 14, 2012, taken aboard the International Space Station, with lake names added
Escanaba's Ludington Park in Michigan
Various national, state, provincial, and municipal jurisdictions govern the Great Lakes
Satellite image of the Great Lakes taken by the Terra satellite on June 16, 2021
Chicago on Lake Michigan is in the western part of the lakes megalopolis and the site of the waterway linking the lakes to the Mississippi River valley
Detroit on the Detroit River links the region's central metropolitan areas

The Chicago River and Calumet River systems connect the Great Lakes Basin to the Mississippi River System through human-made alterations and canals.

While enormous public investments such as the Deep Tunnel projects in Chicago and Milwaukee have greatly reduced the frequency and volume of these events, they have not been eliminated.

Development of the Great Lakes

Chicago Portage

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Ancient portage that connected the Great Lakes waterway system with the Mississippi River system.

Ancient portage that connected the Great Lakes waterway system with the Mississippi River system.

Development of the Great Lakes
Map of ancient Lake Chicago in what became the portage region
Continental Divides of North America. The pink line (center-right) denotes the Great Lakes-St Lawrence divide that runs through Chicago
Canoes in a fog, Lake Superior by Francis Anne Hopkins
Detail from a French map (1775) showing the Chicago Portage
Map of Chicago Portage
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Flag of Chicago, Illinois

A strategic location, it became a key to European activity in the Midwest, ultimately leading to the foundation of Chicago.

This was a substantial river, comparable to today's Niagara River, and over time it carved the channel later used by the main and south branch of the Chicago River, the Des Plaines River, and the terrain that became the Chicago Portage.

Illinois River

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Principal tributary of the Mississippi River and is approximately 273 mi long.

Principal tributary of the Mississippi River and is approximately 273 mi long.

Peoria, Illinois is the largest city on the river
The Illinois River as mapped in 1718, modern Illinois state highlighted.
River tow leaving the Starved Rock Lock headed down river.
The Illinois River, as seen from Starved Rock State Park. The dam (upper-left center) is part of the infrastructure of the Illinois Waterway
Aerial view looking west along the Illinois River, with Marseilles (bottom) and Ottawa (center frame).
Late October 2009 (before the flood)
Early November 2009 (during the flood)

The portages between the Des Plaines and Chicago Rivers and the Kankakee and St. Joseph rivers allowed Native Americans, Europeans, and later Americans access between the Great Lakes and the Mississippi basin.

After the I&M Canal saw a string of cities, such as LaSalle, Peru, and Ottawa grow along the river, extending Chicago's influence into the Mississippi Valley.

There are no known portraits of Jean Baptiste Point du Sable made during his lifetime. This depiction is taken from A. T. Andreas' book History of Chicago (1884).

Jean Baptiste Point du Sable

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There are no known portraits of Jean Baptiste Point du Sable made during his lifetime. This depiction is taken from A. T. Andreas' book History of Chicago (1884).
Map of eastern North America in the late 18thcentury, just prior to the American Revolutionary War. Point duSable lived near Lake Michigan and the Illinois Country (center left).
Drawing of the former home of Jean Baptiste Point du Sable in Chicago as it appeared in the early 1800s
The DuSable Museum of African American History in Washington Park

Jean Baptiste Point du Sable (also spelled Point de Sable, Point au Sable, Point Sable, Pointe DuSable; before 1750 – 28 August 1818) is regarded as the first permanent non-Indigenous settler of what would later become Chicago, Illinois, and is recognized as the "Founder of Chicago".

The site where he settled near the mouth of the Chicago River around the 1780s is identified as a National Historic Landmark, now located in Pioneer Court.

35 East Wacker

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333 North Michigan, 360 North Michigan, Mather Tower and 35 East Wacker
Wacker Drive entrance.
Clock on the northeast corner
Dome atop the building

35 East Wacker, also known as the Jewelers' Building, is a 40-story 523 ft historic building in the Loop community area of Chicago, Illinois, United States, located at the intersection of Wabash Avenue and E. Wacker Dr., facing the Chicago River.

Chicago Union Station

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Union Station serves as a terminal for all Amtrak trains to Chicago (orange), as well as several Metra lines (green). Thin black lines represent former Amtrak routings.
Union Station Transit Center and station garage
Map of historical routes and services
The Great Hall
Night and Day by Henry Hering
Chicago Union Station Power House
Chicago Daily News Building
Union Depot, the first union station in Chicago
The 1922 proposal for Union Station included a taller tower of offices above the terminal, but only a few stories for railroad offices were completed.
Dedication of the new station in 1925
Part of the restored Burlington Room
The station's parking in 2011; the lot in the foreground is now a bus station; the garage permanently closed in 2019.
Great Hall renovations in 2018
One of the two grand staircases, where movie scenes such as The Untouchables were filmed
Chicago Union Station Power House

Chicago Union Station is an intercity and commuter rail terminal located in the Near West Side neighborhood of Chicago, Illinois.

The station is just west of the Chicago River between West Adams Street and West Jackson Boulevard, adjacent to the Chicago Loop.