Chicago Cubs

CubsChicago OrphansCHCChicagoCHIChicago White StockingsChicago Colts/OrphansWhite StockingsChicago NLCubbies
The Chicago Cubs are an American professional baseball team based in Chicago, Illinois.wikipedia
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Chicago White Sox

White SoxChicago White StockingsChicago
The Cubs are one of two major league teams in Chicago; the other, the Chicago White Sox, is a member of the American League (AL) Central division.
They are one of two major league clubs in Chicago; the other is the Chicago Cubs of the National League (NL) Central division.

1906 Chicago Cubs season

1906 Chicago CubsChicago Cubs1906
The 1906 Cubs won 116 games, finishing 116–36 and posting a modern-era record winning percentage of .763, before losing the World Series to the Chicago White Sox ("The Hitless Wonders") by four games to two.
The 1906 Chicago Cubs season was the 35th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 31st in the National League and the 14th at West Side Park.

1903 Chicago Cubs season

1903
The Cubs, first known as the White Stockings, were a founding member of the NL in 1876, becoming the Chicago Cubs in 1903.
The 1903 Chicago Cubs season was the 32nd season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 28th in the National League and the 11th at West Side Park.

1907 World Series

1907World Series1907 Series
The Cubs won back-to-back World Series championships in 1907 and 1908, becoming the first major league team to play in three consecutive World Series, and the first to win it twice.
The 1907 World Series featured the Chicago Cubs and the Detroit Tigers, with the Cubs winning the Series four games to none (with one tie) for their first championship.

1908 World Series

1908World Series108 years
The Cubs won back-to-back World Series championships in 1907 and 1908, becoming the first major league team to play in three consecutive World Series, and the first to win it twice.
The 1908 World Series matched the defending champion Chicago Cubs against the Detroit Tigers in a rematch of the 1907 Series.

1876 in baseball

1876next seasonseason
The Cubs, first known as the White Stockings, were a founding member of the NL in 1876, becoming the Chicago Cubs in 1903.

Cardinals–Cubs rivalry

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This was the genesis of what would eventually become one of the greatest rivalries in sports.
The Cardinals–Cubs rivalry, also called the Route 66 rivalry and The I-55 rivalry, refers to the rivalry between the St. Louis Cardinals and Chicago Cubs of the National League (NL), one of the most bitter rivalries in Major League Baseball and in all of North American professional sports.

Cap Anson

Adrian "Cap" AnsonAdrian AnsonAnson
Owner William Hulbert signed multiple star players, such as pitcher Albert Spalding and infielders Ross Barnes, Deacon White, and Adrian "Cap" Anson, to join the team prior to the N.L.'s first season.
Anson spent most of his career with the Chicago Cubs franchise (then known as the "White Stockings" and later the "Colts"), serving as the club's manager, first baseman and, later in his tenure, minority owner.

Joe Tinker

Tinker
During this period, which has become known as baseball's dead-ball era, Cub infielders Joe Tinker, Johnny Evers, and Frank Chance were made famous as a double-play combination by Franklin P. Adams' poem Baseball's Sad Lexicon.
He played from 1902 through 1916 for the Chicago Cubs and Cincinnati Reds of Major League Baseball (MLB) and the Chicago Whales of the Federal League.

List of National League pennant winners

National League pennantpennantNational League pennants
Most recently, the Cubs won the 2016 National League Championship Series and 2016 World Series, which ended a 71-year National League pennant drought and a 108-year World Series championship drought, both of which are record droughts in Major League Baseball.
In third place is the St. Louis Cardinals (19 pennants and 28 playoff appearances), followed by the Atlanta Braves (17 pennants and 23 postseason appearances between their three home cities of Atlanta, Milwaukee, and Boston) and the Chicago Cubs (17 pennants and 20 playoff appearances as the Cubs and White Stockings).

Frank Chance

ChanceFrank Leroy Chance
During this period, which has become known as baseball's dead-ball era, Cub infielders Joe Tinker, Johnny Evers, and Frank Chance were made famous as a double-play combination by Franklin P. Adams' poem Baseball's Sad Lexicon.
A first baseman, Chance played in Major League Baseball for the Chicago Cubs (initially named the "Orphans") and New York Yankees from 1898 through 1914.

Johnny Evers

EversJohn Joseph Evers
During this period, which has become known as baseball's dead-ball era, Cub infielders Joe Tinker, Johnny Evers, and Frank Chance were made famous as a double-play combination by Franklin P. Adams' poem Baseball's Sad Lexicon.
He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1902 through 1917 for the Chicago Cubs, Boston Braves, and Philadelphia Phillies.

Baseball's Sad Lexicon

Tinker to Evers to ChanceTinker to Evers to Chance.Tinker, Evers and Chance
During this period, which has become known as baseball's dead-ball era, Cub infielders Joe Tinker, Johnny Evers, and Frank Chance were made famous as a double-play combination by Franklin P. Adams' poem Baseball's Sad Lexicon.
The eight-line poem is presented as a single, rueful stanza from the point of view of a New York Giants fan watching the Chicago Cubs infield of shortstop Joe Tinker, second baseman Johnny Evers, and first baseman Frank Chance complete a double play.

Wrigley Field

Cubs ParkWeeghman ParkChicago
The team plays its home games at Wrigley Field, located on the city's North Side.
It is the home of the Chicago Cubs, one of the city's two Major League Baseball (MLB) franchises.

National League

NLNationalNational League of Professional Baseball Clubs
The Cubs compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) Central division.
The two remaining original NL franchises, Boston and Chicago, remain still in operation today as the Atlanta Braves and the Chicago Cubs.

St. Louis Cardinals

St. Louis BrownsCardinalsSt. Louis
Both seasons resulted in matchups with the St. Louis Brown Stockings, with the clubs tying in 1885 and with St. Louis winning in 1886.
The Browns twice met the Chicago White Stockings – the Chicago Cubs prototype – tying one in a heated dispute and winning the other, thus spurring the vigorous St. Louis-Chicago rivalry that ensues to this day.

1890 in baseball

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As a result, Chicago's club nickname transitioned, and by 1890 they had become known as the Chicago Colts, or sometimes "Anson's Colts", referring to Cap's influence within the club.

1918 World Series

1918World Series1918 Series
The Cubs responded by winning a pennant in the war-shortened season of 1918, where they played a part in another team's curse: the Boston Red Sox defeated Grover Cleveland Alexander's Cubs four games to two in the 1918 World Series, Boston's last Series championship until 2004.
The 1918 World Series featured the Boston Red Sox, who defeated the Chicago Cubs four games to two.

Ed Reulbach

Mordecai "Three-Finger" Brown, Jack Taylor, Ed Reulbach, Jack Pfiester, and Orval Overall were several key pitchers for the Cubs during this time period.
Edward Marvin "Big Ed" Reulbach (December 1, 1882 – July 17, 1961) was a major league baseball pitcher for the Chicago Cubs during their glory years of the early 1900s.

Hack Wilson

Lewis "Hack" WilsonLewis WilsonLewis Wilson (baseball)
There were some historic moments for the Cubs as well; In 1930, Hack Wilson, one of the top home run hitters in the game, had one of the most impressive seasons in MLB history, hitting 56 home runs and establishing the current runs-batted-in record of 191.
Lewis Robert "Hack" Wilson (April 26, 1900 – November 23, 1948) was an American Major League Baseball player who played 12 seasons for the New York Giants, Chicago Cubs, Brooklyn Dodgers and Philadelphia Phillies.

Community areas in Chicago

community areacommunity areasNorth Side
The team plays its home games at Wrigley Field, located on the city's North Side.
It is the home of the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field.

Grover Cleveland Alexander

Pete AlexanderGrover AlexanderGrover C. Alexander
The Cubs responded by winning a pennant in the war-shortened season of 1918, where they played a part in another team's curse: the Boston Red Sox defeated Grover Cleveland Alexander's Cubs four games to two in the 1918 World Series, Boston's last Series championship until 2004.
He played from 1911 through 1930 for the Philadelphia Phillies, Chicago Cubs, and St. Louis Cardinals.

1938 Chicago Cubs season

Chicago Cubs1938Cubs
The '38 club saw Dizzy Dean lead the team's pitching staff and provided a historic moment when they won a crucial late-season game at Wrigley Field over the Pittsburgh Pirates with a walk-off home run by Gabby Hartnett, which became known in baseball lore as "The Homer in the Gloamin'".
The 1938 Chicago Cubs season was the 67th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 63rd in the National League and the 23rd at Wrigley Field.

Gabby Hartnett

Leo (Gabby) Hartnett
That 1930 club, which boasted six eventual hall of fame members (Wilson, Gabby Hartnett, Rogers Hornsby, George "High Pockets" Kelly, Kiki Cuyler and manager Joe McCarthy) established the current team batting average record of .309.
He played almost his entire career in Major League Baseball as a catcher for the Chicago Cubs, from 1922 to 1940.

Jack Taylor (1900s pitcher)

Jack TaylorJack Taylor (20th century baseball player)Jack W. Taylor
Mordecai "Three-Finger" Brown, Jack Taylor, Ed Reulbach, Jack Pfiester, and Orval Overall were several key pitchers for the Cubs during this time period.
John W. Taylor (January 14, 1874 – March 4, 1938) was a right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball for the Chicago Cubs and St. Louis Cardinals.