Maddux in 2009
The 1876 White Stockings won the NL championship.
Maddux pitching for the Braves in 1994
The 1906 Cubs won a record 116 of 154 games. They then won back-to-back World Series titles in 1907–08.
1913 Chicago Cubs
Maddux pitching for the Cubs in 2006
Hall of Famer Hack Wilson
Club logo (1927–1936)
Maddux pitching for the Padres
Cubs logo (1941–1945)
Maddux in the dugout in 2008
A sports-related curse that was supposedly placed on the Chicago Cubs by Billy Goat Tavern owner William Sianis during Game 4 of the 1945 World Series.
Ernie Banks ("Mr. Cub")
Ryne Sandberg set numerous league and club records in his career and was elected to the Hall of Fame in 2005.
Andre Dawson, 5× All-Star and 1987 NL MVP during tenure in Chicago
Sammy Sosa was the captain of the Chicago Cubs during his tenure with the team.
Kerry Wood, along with Mark Prior, led the Cubs' rotation in 2003.
Dempster emerged in 2004 and became the Cubs' regular closer.
Alfonso Soriano signed with the club in 2007.
Carlos Zambrano warming up before a game
Starlin Castro during his 2010 rookie season
One of two Cubs building blocks, Anthony Rizzo, swinging in the box
The Cubs celebrate after winning the 2016 World Series.
2016 Champions visit the White House in June 2017.
Clark (left) with the Oriole Bird
Ron Santo
Billy Williams
Ferguson Jenkins
Kiki Cuyler
Mordecai "Three Finger" Brown
Harry Caray

Maddux is best known for his accomplishments while playing for the Atlanta Braves and the Chicago Cubs.

- Greg Maddux

In 1989, the first full season with night baseball at Wrigley Field, Don Zimmer's Cubs were led by a core group of veterans in Ryne Sandberg, Rick Sutcliffe and Andre Dawson, who were boosted by a crop of youngsters such as Mark Grace, Shawon Dunston, Greg Maddux, Rookie of the Year Jerome Walton, and Rookie of the Year Runner-Up Dwight Smith.

- Chicago Cubs

7 related topics

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The Hall of Fame in 2020

National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum

History museum and hall of fame in Cooperstown, New York, operated by private interests.

History museum and hall of fame in Cooperstown, New York, operated by private interests.

The Hall of Fame in 2020
The Hall of Fame in 2020
Seven of the American League's 1937 All-Star players: Lou Gehrig, Joe Cronin, Bill Dickey, Joe DiMaggio, Charlie Gehringer, Jimmie Foxx, and Hank Greenberg. All seven were inducted into the Hall of Fame.
1971 inductee Satchel Paige
"Shoeless Joe" Jackson in 1913
Frank Robinson with the Cincinnati Reds in 1961
Carlton Fisk with the Boston Red Sox in 1976
Dave Winfield with the San Diego Padres c.1977
Plaque Gallery in 2001. The central pillar is for the newest (2000) inductees at the time.
Gallery during 2007 HOF induction weekend
Whole New Ballgame —
the modern game
Examples of the National Baseball Hall of Fame coins produced by the United States Mint

Andre Dawson: Dawson's cap depicts him as a member of the Expos, his team for eleven years, despite his expressed preference to be shown as a member of the Chicago Cubs. While Dawson played only six years with the Cubs, five of his eight All-Star appearances were as a Cub, and his only MVP award came in his first year with the team in 1987.

Greg Maddux: Although Maddux had his greatest success while with the Atlanta Braves for 11 seasons, he had two stints with the Chicago Cubs for a total of 10 seasons, including the first seven of his MLB career. Maddux believed that both fanbases were equally important in his career, and so the cap on his plaque does not feature any logo. His biography on the Hall's website lists his primary team as the Braves.

Jenkins in 1973

Ferguson Jenkins

Canadian former professional baseball pitcher and coach.

Canadian former professional baseball pitcher and coach.

Jenkins in 1973
Jenkins in 1997

He played Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1965 to 1983 for the Philadelphia Phillies, Chicago Cubs, Texas Rangers and Boston Red Sox.

Jenkins, fellow Cub Greg Maddux, Curt Schilling, and Pedro Martínez are the only major league pitchers to ever record more than 3,000 strikeouts with fewer than 1,000 walks.

Nolan Ryan holds the record for no-hitters in the major leagues with seven.

No-hitter

Game in which a team was not able to record a single hit through conventional means.

Game in which a team was not able to record a single hit through conventional means.

Nolan Ryan holds the record for no-hitters in the major leagues with seven.
Hall of Famer Sandy Koufax threw four no-hitters, including one perfect game, during his MLB career.
Jason Varitek caught four no-hitters during his MLB career.
Mike Witt pitched in both a complete game no-hitter and a combined no-hitter.
Bob Feller pitched the first (and to date only) Opening Day no-hitter, in 1940.
Ken Johnson pitched a no-hitter in 1964 but was the losing pitcher of the game.
Matt Young allowed no hits in a 1992 game that is not considered a no-hitter because he only pitched eight innings.
Rich Hill had a potential no-hitter broken up in extra innings in 2017.
Justin Verlander threw his first two no-hitters for the Detroit Tigers, and more recently one for the Houston Astros.
Joe Musgrove pitched the most recent, and to date only, no-hitter for the San Diego Padres.
Len Barker's perfect game is the most recent no-hitter for the Cleveland Indians.

the first came on September 13, 2020, with the Chicago Cubs, and the second on April 9, 2021, with the San Diego Padres.

At the other end of the spectrum, there are nine 300-game winners—Grover Cleveland Alexander, Kid Nichols, Lefty Grove, Early Wynn, Steve Carlton, Don Sutton, Greg Maddux, Roger Clemens and Tom Glavine—who failed to pitch a no-hitter.

Hendry in 2006

Jim Hendry

American baseball coach and executive.

American baseball coach and executive.

Hendry in 2006

He is a special assistant for New York Yankees general manager Brian Cashman, and is a former general manager of the Chicago Cubs.

After failing to close out the 2003 NLCS against the Florida Marlins, Hendry made several acquisitions, picking up first baseman Derrek Lee for Hee-seop Choi in a trade with the Marlins, acquiring catcher Michael Barrett in a three-way trade with the Oakland Athletics, giving up Damian Miller in the process and Montreal Expos, signing free agents LaTroy Hawkins, Todd Walker and Greg Maddux.

Billy Bean stands by the NLCS logo at Dodger Stadium in 2016

1989 National League Championship Series

Played between the National League West champion San Francisco Giants and the National League East champion Chicago Cubs.

Played between the National League West champion San Francisco Giants and the National League East champion Chicago Cubs.

Billy Bean stands by the NLCS logo at Dodger Stadium in 2016

The Cubs also had three pitchers with 16 or more victories, Rick Sutcliffe, Mike Bielecki, and Greg Maddux, coming off his third full season in the majors.

1989 NLCS (4–1): San Francisco Giants over Chicago Cubs

1998 National League Division Series

The Atlanta Braves and San Diego Padres went on to meet in the NL Championship Series (NLCS).

The Atlanta Braves and San Diego Padres went on to meet in the NL Championship Series (NLCS).

(1) Atlanta Braves (Eastern Division champion, 106–56) vs. (4) Chicago Cubs (Wild Card, 90–73): Braves win series, 3–0.

Greg Maddux faced Rookie of the Year Kerry Wood, hoping to keep the ship afloat for the Cubs.

Tom Glavine pitches in spring training, 1998. Chipper Jones plays third base in background.

1998 Atlanta Braves season

The 1998 Atlanta Braves season marked the franchise's 33rd season in Atlanta and 128th overall.

The 1998 Atlanta Braves season marked the franchise's 33rd season in Atlanta and 128th overall.

Tom Glavine pitches in spring training, 1998. Chipper Jones plays third base in background.

The team featured six all stars: shortstop Walt Weiss and third baseman Chipper Jones were voted as starters, while first baseman Andrés Galarraga, catcher Javy López, and pitchers Tom Glavine and Greg Maddux were selected as reserves.

The 1998 Braves beat the Chicago Cubs three games to none in the National League Division Series.