Charles Comiskey, shown here circa 1910, guided the Browns to four American Association titles.
The 1876 White Stockings won the NL championship.
Rogers Hornsby won two Triple Crowns as a Cardinal.
The 1906 Cubs won a record 116 of 154 games. They then won back-to-back World Series titles in 1907–08.
Stan Musial retired owning numerous National League and team batting records.
1913 Chicago Cubs
Bob Gibson, the most decorated pitcher in team history, won two Cy Young Awards.
Hall of Famer Hack Wilson
Pitcher Chris Carpenter, essential in two World Series titles, won 10 playoff games with a 3.00 postseason ERA.
Club logo (1927–1936)
Albert Pujols is one of the most accomplished players in Cardinals' history.
Cubs logo (1941–1945)
Sportsman's Park during the 1946 World Series
A sports-related curse that was supposedly placed on the Chicago Cubs by Billy Goat Tavern owner William Sianis during Game 4 of the 1945 World Series.
Busch Memorial Stadium, home stadium from 1966 to 2005
Ernie Banks ("Mr. Cub")
St. Louis logo (1900–1919)
Ryne Sandberg set numerous league and club records in his career and was elected to the Hall of Fame in 2005.
St. Louis mascot Fredbird, 2013
Andre Dawson, 5× All-Star and 1987 NL MVP during tenure in Chicago
Red Schoendienst (1965–76, 1980, 1990)
Sammy Sosa was the captain of the Chicago Cubs during his tenure with the team.
Tony La Russa (1996–2011)
Kerry Wood, along with Mark Prior, led the Cubs' rotation in 2003.
Joe Medwick's Triple Crown in 1937 is the last in the history of the National League
Dempster emerged in 2004 and became the Cubs' regular closer.
Lou Brock
Alfonso Soriano signed with the club in 2007.
Dizzy Dean
Carlos Zambrano warming up before a game
Curt Flood
Starlin Castro during his 2010 rookie season
Enos Slaughter
One of two Cubs building blocks, Anthony Rizzo, swinging in the box
Ozzie Smith
The Cubs celebrate after winning the 2016 World Series.
Bruce Sutter
2016 Champions visit the White House in June 2017.
Harry Caray
Clark (left) with the Oriole Bird
Ron Santo
Billy Williams
Ferguson Jenkins
Kiki Cuyler
Mordecai "Three Finger" Brown
Harry Caray

St. Louis has also won 14 division titles in the East and Central divisions.

- St. Louis Cardinals

This was due to the demands of the Chicago Cubs and St. Louis Cardinals, who refused to support expansion unless they were promised they would be kept together in the newly created East division.

- National League East

In two of these championships, the Browns met the Chicago White Stockings, now the Chicago Cubs, launching the enduring Cardinals–Cubs rivalry.

- St. Louis Cardinals

Both seasons resulted in matchups with the St. Louis Brown Stockings, with the clubs tying in 1885 and with St. Louis winning in 1886.

- Chicago Cubs

In the Cubs, managed by Leo Durocher, built a substantial lead in the newly created National League Eastern Division by mid-August.

- Chicago Cubs

3 related topics with Alpha

Overall

National League

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Older of two leagues constituting Major League Baseball (MLB) in the United States and Canada, and the world's oldest extant professional team sports league.

Older of two leagues constituting Major League Baseball (MLB) in the United States and Canada, and the world's oldest extant professional team sports league.

Shea Stadium prior to the start of a New York Mets game in 2008. Shea had the best attendance in the National League that year, drawing over 53,000 fans per game on average.
Morgan Bulkeley, the first president of the National League

The two remaining original NL franchises, Boston and Chicago, remain still in operation today as the Atlanta Braves and the Chicago Cubs.

With the merger, the NL absorbed the St. Louis Browns (now known as the St. Louis Cardinals), along with three other teams that did not survive into the 20th century (for those three teams, see Partnership with the American League below).

In 1969, as a result of its expansion to 12 teams, the National League—which for its first 93 years had competed equally in a single grouping—was reorganized into two divisions of six teams (respectively named the National League East and West, although geographically it was more like North and South), with the division champions meeting in the National League Championship Series (an additional round of postseason competition) for the right to advance to the World Series.

Rooftop view of a 1903 World Series game in Boston

World Series

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Annual championship series of Major League Baseball in the United States and Canada, contested since 1903 between the champion teams of the American League (AL) and the National League (NL).

Annual championship series of Major League Baseball in the United States and Canada, contested since 1903 between the champion teams of the American League (AL) and the National League (NL).

Rooftop view of a 1903 World Series game in Boston
Christy Mathewson threw 3 complete-game shutouts in the 1905 World Series.
The 1919 Chicago White Sox team photo
Bill Mazeroski hit a dramatic ninth-inning walk-off home run that decided the 1960 World Series
The Catch: Willie Mays hauls in Vic Wertz's drive near the wall in Game 1 of the 1954 World Series.
1959 World Series action at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum
1968 World Series program and tickets for Games 4 and 5 at Tiger Stadium
Carlton Fisk, best known for his "waving fair" home run in Game 6 of the 1975 World Series
Reggie Jackson earned the nickname "Mr. October" by hitting three consecutive home runs in the clinching game six of the 1977 World Series
President Ronald Reagan with the 1988 World Series champions: Los Angeles Dodgers
In Game 6 of the 1991 World Series, Kirby Puckett made a memorable leaping catch in left field to rob an extra-base hit. In the bottom of the 11th inning, Puckett hit a game-winning home run to send the Series to Game 7
Fireworks in SkyDome after Joe Carter's 1993 World Series-winning home run
Game 1 of the 2008 World Series between the Philadelphia Phillies (NL) and Tampa Bay Rays (AL) at Tropicana Field
In 2011, David Freese hit a game-tying two-run triple (with two outs) to send it into extra innings. In the bottom of the 11th, Freese led off with a game-winning home run to send the Series to Game 7
Chicago Cubs celebrate their 2016 World Series victory, their first in 108 years
Game action in the 1906 Series in Chicago (the only all-Chicago World Series to date)
Bill Wambsganss completes his unassisted triple play in 1920
Washington's Bucky Harris scores his home run in the fourth inning of Game 7 (October 10, 1924)
The Chicago Cubs celebrate winning the 2016 World Series, which ended the club's 108-year championship drought.

The two most prolific World Series winners to date, the New York Yankees and the St. Louis Cardinals, did not win their first championship until the 1920s; and three of the teams that were highly successful prior to 1920 (the Boston Red Sox, Chicago White Sox and the Chicago Cubs) went the rest of the 20th century without another World Series win.

12) Two divisions - the American League Central and the National League East - exclusively comprise teams that have won at least one World Series. In the AL Central, the Cleveland Indians, Kansas City Royals, Detroit Tigers, Minnesota Twins, and Chicago White Sox have each won the World Series at least twice; the Twins are the only one to win a title under a different name, having won the 1924 title as the original Washington Senators, while only the White Sox and Royals have won as members of this division. All five current NL East members have won as members of this division: the Atlanta Braves have won four titles (in 1914 as the Boston Braves, 1957 as the Milwaukee Braves, and 1995 and 2021 as Atlanta), the Philadelphia Phillies, Miami Marlins (as the Florida Marlins) and the New York Mets have each won twice, and the Washington Nationals have won one title.

National League Central

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One of Major League Baseball's six divisions.

One of Major League Baseball's six divisions.

This division was created in 1994, by moving two teams from the National League West (the Cincinnati Reds and the Houston Astros) and three teams from the National League East (the Chicago Cubs, the Pittsburgh Pirates, and the St. Louis Cardinals).