Chief of the General Staff (United Kingdom)

Chief of the Imperial General StaffChief of the General StaffImperial General StaffCIGSGeneral StaffBritish General StaffChief of General StaffChief of the Imperial General Staff (CIGS)British Army Chief of the General StaffCGS
Chief of the General Staff (CGS) has been the title of the professional head of the British Army since 1964.wikipedia
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British Army

ArmyBritishBritish troops
Chief of the General Staff (CGS) has been the title of the professional head of the British Army since 1964.
The army is administered by the Ministry of Defence and commanded by the Chief of the General Staff.

Chiefs of Staff Committee

Chiefs of StaffBritish Chiefs of StaffChiefs-of-Staff
The CGS is a member of both the Chiefs of Staff Committee and the Army Board.
The Committee also consists of the professional heads of each branch of the armed forces: the First Sea Lord and Chief of the Naval Staff, the Chief of the General Staff and the Chief of the Air Staff.

Mark Carleton-Smith

Sir Mark Carleton-SmithMark Alexander Popham Carleton-SmithGeneral Mark Carleton-Smith
The current Chief of the General Staff is General Sir Mark Carleton-Smith – having succeeded his predecessor, General Sir Nick Carter in June 2018.
He became Chief of the General Staff in June 2018, succeeding General Sir Nick Carter.

Nick Carter (British Army officer)

Nick CarterSir Nick CarterSir Nicholas Carter
The current Chief of the General Staff is General Sir Mark Carleton-Smith – having succeeded his predecessor, General Sir Nick Carter in June 2018.
In September 2014, he became head of the British Army as Chief of the General Staff succeeding General Sir Peter Wall.

Neville Lyttelton

Sir Neville LytteltonLytteltonNeville Gerald Lyttelton
The post was then held by General Sir Neville Lyttelton and, briefly, by Field Marshal Sir William Nicholson.
He was Chief of the General Staff at the time of the Haldane Reforms and then became Commander-in-Chief, Ireland.

Commander-in-Chief of the Forces

Commander-in-ChiefCommander-in-Chief of the British ArmyCommander in Chief
The title was also used for five years between the demise of the Commander-in-Chief of the Forces in 1904 and the introduction of Chief of the Imperial General Staff in 1909.
The office was replaced in 1904 with the creation of the Army Council and the appointment of Chief of the General Staff.

British Armed Forces

British militaryForcesarmed forces
Since 1959, the post has been immediately subordinate to the Chief of the Defence Staff, the post held by the professional head of the British Armed Forces.
The three services have their own respective professional chiefs: the First Sea Lord, the Chief of the General Staff and the Chief of the Air Staff.

William Nicholson, 1st Baron Nicholson

William NicholsonSir William NicholsonWilliam Gustavus Nicholson
The post was then held by General Sir Neville Lyttelton and, briefly, by Field Marshal Sir William Nicholson.
He became Chief of the Imperial General Staff and was closely involved in the reorganisation of the British Army in the early years of the 20th century.

Deputy Chief of the General Staff (United Kingdom)

Deputy Chief of the Imperial General StaffDeputy Chief of the General StaffDeputy Chief of Imperial General Staff
Deputy Chief of the General Staff (DCGS) is the title of the deputy to the Chief of the General Staff, the professional head of the British Army.

First Sea Lord

First Naval LordSenior Naval LordFirst Sea Lord and Chief of the Naval Staff
From 1923 onward, the First Sea Lord was a member of the Chiefs of Staff Committee and from 1923 to 1959, in rotation with the representatives of the other services (the Chief of the Imperial General Staff and Chief of the Air Staff), he would serve as the chairman of that committee and head of all British armed forces.

Chief of the Defence Staff (United Kingdom)

Chief of the Defence StaffChief of Defence StaffCDS
Since 1959, the post has been immediately subordinate to the Chief of the Defence Staff, the post held by the professional head of the British Armed Forces.

David Margesson, 1st Viscount Margesson

David MargessonLord Margesson1st Viscount Margesson
Brooke vigorously allocated responsibilities to his deputies, and despite the traditional historical distrust that had existed between the military and the political side of the War Office, he got along quite well with his counterpart, the Secretary of State for War, first David Margesson and later, Sir James Grigg.

James Grigg

Sir P. J. GriggP. J. GriggPercy James Grigg
Brooke vigorously allocated responsibilities to his deputies, and despite the traditional historical distrust that had existed between the military and the political side of the War Office, he got along quite well with his counterpart, the Secretary of State for War, first David Margesson and later, Sir James Grigg.

Structure of the British Army in 1989

British Army Structure 1989
The Executive Committee of the Army Board was responsible for the 'detailed management of the Army.' It included the four military members of the Army Board, including the Chief of the General Staff, General Sir John Chapple in 1989, the Second Permanent Under Secretary, and the Assistant Chief of the General Staff, a major general.

Sir William Robertson, 1st Baronet

William RobertsonSir William RobertsonRobertson
Field Marshal Sir William Robert Robertson, 1st Baronet, (29 January 1860 – 12 February 1933) was a British Army officer who served as Chief of the Imperial General Staff (CIGS) – the professional head of the British Army – from 1916 to 1918 during the First World War.

Edmund Ironside, 1st Baron Ironside

Edmund IronsideGeneral IronsideSir Edmund Ironside
Field Marshal William Edmund Ironside, 1st Baron Ironside, (6 May 1880 – 22 September 1959) was a senior officer of the British Army, who served as Chief of the Imperial General Staff during the first year of the Second World War.

Gerald Templer

Sir Gerald TemplerGerald Walter Robert Templer General '''Sir Gerald Walter Robert Templer
As Chief of the Imperial General Staff, the professional head of the British Army, from 1955–58, he was Prime Minister Anthony Eden's chief military adviser during the Suez Crisis.

Richard Hull

Sir Richard HullRichard Amyatt HullField Marshal Sir Richard Hull
He was the last Chief of the Imperial General Staff (1961–64) and the first Chief of the General Staff (1964–65), and, as such, the professional head of the British Army.