Chief operating officer

COOChief Operations OfficerCEODirector of OperationsOperations DirectorPresidentC.O.O.head of operations(COO)Chief of Operations
The chief operating officer (COO), also called the chief operations officer, is one of the highest-ranking executive positions in an organization, comprising part of the "C-Suite".wikipedia
2,001 Related Articles

Corporate title

corporate executiveexecutiveexecutives
The chief operating officer (COO), also called the chief operations officer, is one of the highest-ranking executive positions in an organization, comprising part of the "C-Suite".
Within the corporate office or corporate center of a company, some companies have a chairman and chief executive officer (CEO) as the top-ranking executive, while the number two is the president and chief operating officer (COO); other companies have a president and CEO but no official deputy.

Chief executive officer

CEOManaging DirectorChief Executive
The COO is responsible for the daily operation of the company, and routinely reports to the highest-ranking executive, usually the chief executive officer (CEO). The COO is usually the second-in-command at the firm, especially if the highest-ranking executive is the chairman and CEO.
Some organizations have subordinate executive officers who also have the word chief in their job title, such as chief operating officer (COO), chief financial officer (CFO) and chief technology officer (CTO).

Tom Anselmi

Tom Anselmi of Maple Leaf Sports & Entertainment was chief operating officer from 2004 until September 6, 2013.
He had previously served as the President and Chief operating officer for Maple Leaf Sports & Entertainment.

Tim Leiweke

Between the departure of Richard Peddie and the hiring of Tim Leiweke for the posts of president and CEO, Anselmi added the title of president from September 4, 2012, to June 30, 2013, however he remained COO and did not receive the title of CEO.
On the same day it was announced the sale had been called off, it was announced Leiweke would be replaced as President and CEO by AEG executive Dan Beckerman, who previously has served as both chief operating officer and chief financial officer.

Compaq

Compaq Computer CorporationCompaq ComputersCompaq Computer
Michael Capellas was appointed president of Hewlett-Packard in order to ease its acquisition and integration of Compaq, where Capellas was previously chairman and CEO.
A couple months after Pfeiffer's ouster, Capellas was elevated to interim chief operating officer on June 2, 2000, and was soon appointed president and CEO.

Bob Iger

Robert IgerRobert A. IgerRobert Allen Iger
Bob Iger was president and COO from 2000 to 2005, when he succeeded Eisner as CEO.
Before working for Disney, Iger served as the President of ABC Television from 1994–95, and as President/COO of Capital Cities/ABC, Inc. from 1995 until Disney's acquisition of the company in 1996.

Thomas O. Staggs

Tom StaggsThomas Staggs
Thomas O. Staggs was COO from 2015 to 2016, during that time the senior executive team had a dual reporting structure to both Staggs and Iger; Staggs resigned after the board did not give him assurances that he would succeed as CEO.
Thomas O. Staggs (born 1961) is the former Chief Operating Officer (COO) of The Walt Disney Company.

Thomas W. LaSorda

Tom LaSordaThomas LaSorda
Thomas W. LaSorda served as president and CEO of Chrysler from January 1, 2006, to August 5, 2007, while Chrysler was owned by Daimler-Benz.
He was first appointed to the board of Daimler in 2004 when he became chief operating officer.

The Walt Disney Company

DisneyWalt Disney ProductionsWalt Disney
The Walt Disney Company has used the President and COO titles in varied ways for their number two executive.
On February 5, 2015, it was announced that Tom Staggs had been promoted to COO.

Stephen A. Miles

Nathan Bennett and Stephen A. Miles have published extensively on the subject of the COO.
Miles’ 2006 book, Riding Shotgun: The Role of the Chief Operating Officer, was featured in the Harvard Business Review as one of the first in-depth studies of the COO’s role within a corporation and how the role can successfully intersect with that of the CEO.

Company

companiesenterpriseenterprises
The COO is responsible for the daily operation of the company, and routinely reports to the highest-ranking executive, usually the chief executive officer (CEO).

Second-in-command

second in command2ICjunior
The COO is usually the second-in-command at the firm, especially if the highest-ranking executive is the chairman and CEO.

Chairperson

ChairmanChairman of the Boardchair
The COO is usually the second-in-command at the firm, especially if the highest-ranking executive is the chairman and CEO.

Vice President of the United States

Vice PresidentU.S. Vice Presidentvice presidential
In many ways, the selection of a COO is similar to the selection of a Vice President or Chief of Staff of the United States: power and responsibility structures vary in government and private regimes depending on the style and needs of the president or CEO.

White House Chief of Staff

Chief of StaffChief of Staff to the PresidentWhite House Chiefs of Staff
In many ways, the selection of a COO is similar to the selection of a Vice President or Chief of Staff of the United States: power and responsibility structures vary in government and private regimes depending on the style and needs of the president or CEO.

General Motors

GMGeneral Motors CorporationGeneral Motors Company
Lloyd E. Reuss was president of General Motors from 1990 to 1992, as the right-hand man of chairman and CEO Robert C. Stempel.

Robert Stempel

Robert C. Stempelunqualified successor
Lloyd E. Reuss was president of General Motors from 1990 to 1992, as the right-hand man of chairman and CEO Robert C. Stempel.

Richard Parsons (businessman)

Richard ParsonsRichard D. ParsonsDick Parsons
Richard D. Parsons was number two in the company hierarchy during his tenure as president of Time Warner from 1995 to 2001, but he had no authority over the operating divisions, and instead took on assignments at the behest of chairman and CEO Gerald Levin.

WarnerMedia

Time WarnerWarner CommunicationsAOL Time Warner
Richard D. Parsons was number two in the company hierarchy during his tenure as president of Time Warner from 1995 to 2001, but he had no authority over the operating divisions, and instead took on assignments at the behest of chairman and CEO Gerald Levin.

Gerald M. Levin

Gerald LevinJerry LevinJonathan Levin
Richard D. Parsons was number two in the company hierarchy during his tenure as president of Time Warner from 1995 to 2001, but he had no authority over the operating divisions, and instead took on assignments at the behest of chairman and CEO Gerald Levin.

Michael Capellas

Michael D. Capellas
Michael Capellas was appointed president of Hewlett-Packard in order to ease its acquisition and integration of Compaq, where Capellas was previously chairman and CEO.

Hewlett-Packard

HPHewlett PackardHewlett-Packard Company
Michael Capellas was appointed president of Hewlett-Packard in order to ease its acquisition and integration of Compaq, where Capellas was previously chairman and CEO.

Bear Stearns

Bear Stearns & Co.Bear WagnerBear, Stearns & Company
In 2007, the investment banking firms of Bear Stearns and Morgan Stanley each had two presidents (Warren Spector and Alan Schwartz at Bear, Robert Scully and Zoe Cruz at Morgan) reporting to one CEO (who was also chairman of the board); each president was essentially a co-COO (despite the lack of title) overseeing half of the firm's business divisions.

Morgan Stanley

Morgan Stanley Dean WitterMorgan Stanley Private EquityMorgan Stanley & Co.
In 2007, the investment banking firms of Bear Stearns and Morgan Stanley each had two presidents (Warren Spector and Alan Schwartz at Bear, Robert Scully and Zoe Cruz at Morgan) reporting to one CEO (who was also chairman of the board); each president was essentially a co-COO (despite the lack of title) overseeing half of the firm's business divisions.

James Cayne

Jimmy Cayne
Schwartz became sole president of Bear after Spector was ousted, and several months later assumed the position of CEO as well when James Cayne was forced to resign (Cayne remained chairman).