Child development

developmentchildhood developmentdevelopmentaldevelopment of childreninfant developmentgrowth delaychild's developmentcognitive developmentemotional developmentphysical growth
Child development entails the biological, psychological and emotional changes that occur in human beings between birth and the conclusion of adolescence, as the individual progresses from dependency to increasing autonomy.wikipedia
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Child care

day carechildcaredaycare
Child care programs present a critical opportunity for the promotion of child development.
Early child care is an equally important and often overlooked component of child development.

Developmental psychology

developmental psychologistchild psychologisthuman development
Child development entails the biological, psychological and emotional changes that occur in human beings between birth and the conclusion of adolescence, as the individual progresses from dependency to increasing autonomy. Related terms include developmental psychology, referring to development throughout the lifespan, and pediatrics, the branch of medicine relating to the care of children.
Developmental psychology involves a range of fields, such as educational psychology, child psychopathology, forensic developmental psychology, child development, cognitive psychology, ecological psychology, and cultural psychology.

Behavior analysis of child development

behavioral model of developmentBehaviour analystschild development behavior
John B. Watson’s behaviorism theory forms the foundation of the behavioral model of development 1925.
The methods used to analyze behavior in child development are based on several types of measurements.

Down syndrome

Down's syndrometrisomy 21down
In evocative genetic-environmental correlation, the child's genetically-caused characteristics cause other people to respond in certain ways, providing a different environment than might occur for a genetically-different child; for instance, a child with Down syndrome may be treated more protectively and less challengingly than a non-Down child.
It is typically associated with physical growth delays, mild to moderate intellectual disability, and characteristic facial features.

Erikson's stages of psychosocial development

stages of psychosocial developmentgrowthmaturation
Erikson, a follower of Freud's, synthesized both Freud's and his own theories to create what is known as the "psychosocial" stages of human development, which span from birth to death, and focuses on "tasks" at each stage that must be accomplished to successfully navigate life's challenges.
Child development

Verbal Behavior

language acquisitionverbal behaviour1959 review of B.F. Skinner's Verbal Behavior
Following Watson's lead, B.F. Skinner further extended this model to cover operant conditioning and verbal behavior.
Child development

Child abuse

abuseabusiveabused
It is the most widespread form of child abuse.
Defining child maltreatment depends on prevailing cultural values as they relate to children, child development, and parenting.

Play (activity)

playplayingplayful
Play
Learning through play has been long recognized as a critical aspect of childhood and child development.

Development of the human body

growthdevelopmentalhuman development
Child development entails the biological, psychological and emotional changes that occur in human beings between birth and the conclusion of adolescence, as the individual progresses from dependency to increasing autonomy.

Autonomy

autonomousnational autonomyautonomously
Child development entails the biological, psychological and emotional changes that occur in human beings between birth and the conclusion of adolescence, as the individual progresses from dependency to increasing autonomy.

Pediatrics

pediatricianpediatricpaediatrician
Related terms include developmental psychology, referring to development throughout the lifespan, and pediatrics, the branch of medicine relating to the care of children.

Developmental biology

developmentdevelopmental biologistdevelopmental
Developmental change may occur as a result of genetically-controlled processes known as maturation, or as a result of environmental factors and learning, but most commonly involves an interaction between the two.

Infant

neonatalinfancynewborn
Some age-related development periods and examples of defined intervals are: newborn (ages 0–4 weeks); infant (ages 4 weeks – 1 year); toddler (ages 1–3 years); preschooler (ages 4–6 years); school-aged child (ages 6–11 years); adolescent (ages 12–19).

Toddler

toddlerstoddleyoung children
Some age-related development periods and examples of defined intervals are: newborn (ages 0–4 weeks); infant (ages 4 weeks – 1 year); toddler (ages 1–3 years); preschooler (ages 4–6 years); school-aged child (ages 6–11 years); adolescent (ages 12–19).

Preschool

pre-schoolnurserynursery school
Some age-related development periods and examples of defined intervals are: newborn (ages 0–4 weeks); infant (ages 4 weeks – 1 year); toddler (ages 1–3 years); preschooler (ages 4–6 years); school-aged child (ages 6–11 years); adolescent (ages 12–19).

Elementary school

elementaryelementary schoolsgrade school
Some age-related development periods and examples of defined intervals are: newborn (ages 0–4 weeks); infant (ages 4 weeks – 1 year); toddler (ages 1–3 years); preschooler (ages 4–6 years); school-aged child (ages 6–11 years); adolescent (ages 12–19).

Adolescence

teenageradolescentteenage
Child development entails the biological, psychological and emotional changes that occur in human beings between birth and the conclusion of adolescence, as the individual progresses from dependency to increasing autonomy. Some age-related development periods and examples of defined intervals are: newborn (ages 0–4 weeks); infant (ages 4 weeks – 1 year); toddler (ages 1–3 years); preschooler (ages 4–6 years); school-aged child (ages 6–11 years); adolescent (ages 12–19).

Urie Bronfenbrenner

BronfenbrennerBronfenbrenner, UrieBronfenbrenner, Urie.
Also called "development in context" or "human ecology" theory, ecological systems theory, originally formulated by Urie Bronfenbrenner specifies four types of nested environmental systems, with bi-directional influences within and between the systems.

Epistemology

epistemologicalepistemictheory of knowledge
Epistemology branches off from philosophy and deals with the origin of knowledge.

Object permanence

invisible displacement problems
According to Piaget, when an infant reaches about 7–9 months of age they begin to develop what he called object permanence, this means the child now has the ability to understand that objects keep existing even when they cannot be seen.

Egocentrism

egocentricself-centeredegocentricity
Some deficiencies in this stage of development are that children who are about 3–4 years old often display what is called egocentrism, which means the child is not able to see someone else's point of view, they feel as if every other person is experiencing the same events and feelings that they are experiencing.

Inductive reasoning

inductioninductiveinductive logic
Children in this stage incorporate inductive reasoning, which involves drawing conclusions from other observations in order to make a generalization.

Imaginary audience

However, there are also some negative aspects which include the child or adolescent developing some egocentric thoughts which include the imaginary audience and the personal fable.

Personal fable

However, there are also some negative aspects which include the child or adolescent developing some egocentric thoughts which include the imaginary audience and the personal fable.

Zone of proximal development

scaffoldingzone of proximal development (ZPD)
However, unlike Piaget, he claimed that timely and sensitive intervention by adults when a child is on the edge of learning a new task (called the zone of proximal development) could help children learn new tasks.