Children's Online Privacy Protection Act

COPPAChildren's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA)Children's Online Privacy Protection Act of 199813 to have an accountChild Online Privacy Protection ActChildren's Online Privacy Act in 1998Children's Online Privacy ProtectionChildren's Online Privacy Protection Act of 1998, or “COPPA”
The Children's Online Privacy Protection Act of 1998 (COPPA) is a United States federal law, located at.wikipedia
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PRIVO

the FTC has approved seven safe harbor programs operated by TRUSTe, ESRB, CARU, PRIVO, Aristotle, Inc., Samet Privacy (kidSAFE), and the Internet Keep Safe Coalition (iKeepSafe).
PRIVO works with companies to ensure their existing or proposed digital properties are compliant with COPPA, GDPR, FERPA, SOPIPA, HIPPA and other governing regulations and best practices protecting kids privacy, helping them build and maintain a successful business model that safely engages with kids, their families and educators.

TrustArc

TRUSTe
the FTC has approved seven safe harbor programs operated by TRUSTe, ESRB, CARU, PRIVO, Aristotle, Inc., Samet Privacy (kidSAFE), and the Internet Keep Safe Coalition (iKeepSafe).
In 2001, TRUSTe became a Children's Online Privacy Protection Act Safe Harbor organization for the Federal Trade Commission and thereafter launched its Children's Privacy Seal Program.

Privacy policy

privacy policiescorporate privacy policiesinformed
It details what a website operator must include in a privacy policy, when and how to seek verifiable consent from a parent or guardian, and what responsibilities an operator has to protect children's privacy and safety online including restrictions on the marketing of those under 13.

Children's Advertising Review Unit

CARU
the FTC has approved seven safe harbor programs operated by TRUSTe, ESRB, CARU, PRIVO, Aristotle, Inc., Samet Privacy (kidSAFE), and the Internet Keep Safe Coalition (iKeepSafe).
These Guidelines served as the basis of the federal Children's Online Privacy Protection Act of 1998 (COPPA).

Entertainment Software Rating Board

ESRBEntertainment Software Ratings BoardM-rated
the FTC has approved seven safe harbor programs operated by TRUSTe, ESRB, CARU, PRIVO, Aristotle, Inc., Samet Privacy (kidSAFE), and the Internet Keep Safe Coalition (iKeepSafe).
In June 2013, the service was extended to mobile apps, with a particular emphasis on helping application developers comply with the then-upcoming changes to the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act.

Federal Trade Commission

FTCU.S. Federal Trade CommissionUnited States Federal Trade Commission
Center of Media Education petitioned the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to investigate the data collection and use practices of the KidsCom.com website, and take legal action since the data practices violated Section 5 of FTC Act concerning "unfair/deceptive practices".

BonziBuddy

Bonzi Buddy
In February 2004, UMG Recordings, Inc. was fined US$400,000 for COPPA violations in connection with a web site that promoted the then 13-year-old pop star Lil' Romeo and hosted child-oriented games and activities, and Bonzi Software, which offered downloads of an animated figure "BonziBuddy" that provided shopping advice, jokes, and trivia was fined US$75,000 for COPPA violations.
On 18 February 2004, the Federal Trade Commission released a statement indicating that Bonzi Software, Inc. was ordered to pay $75,000 in fees, among other aspects, for violating the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act by collecting personal information from children under the age of 13 with BonziBuddy.

ByteDance

Bytedance Technology Co.
In February 2019, the FTC issued a fine of $5.7 million to ByteDance for failing to comply with COPPA with their TikTok app.
On February 27, 2019, the FTC fined Musical.ly US$5.7 million for collecting information from minors under the age of 13 in violation of the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act in the United States.

YouTube

YouTube channelYouTube.comYouTube Gaming
On September 4, 2019, the FTC issued a fine of $170 million to YouTube for COPPA violations, including tracking viewing history of minors in order to facilitate targeted advertising.
In April 2018, a coalition of 23 groups (including the CCFC, CDD, as well as Common Sense Media) filed a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission, alleging that YouTube collected information from users under the age of 13 without parental consent, in violation of the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA).

TikTok

Tik TokDouyinTik Tok (app)
In February 2019, the FTC issued a fine of $5.7 million to ByteDance for failing to comply with COPPA with their TikTok app.
On 27 February 2019, the United States Federal Trade Commission fined ByteDance US$5.7 million for collecting information from minors under the age of 13 in violation of the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act.

Do Not Track legislation

Do Not Track Kids Act of 2011
Effective April 21, 2000, the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) applies to the online collection of personal information by persons or entities under U.S. jurisdiction about children under 13 years of age.

Common Sense Media

CommonsensemediaCommonsensemedia.orgCommon Sense
The next year, Jim Steyer, the CEO of Common Sense Media, has called for updates to COPPA, calling the time of the act's creation "the stone age of digital media" and pointing out the lack of platforms such as Google, YouTube, Facebook and Twitter at the time.
It has also called for updates to the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) rules to ensure that they keep pace with changes in technology since the law was passed in 1998 – as documented by Common Sense Media in a report to the Federal Trade Commission as part of a review of the law.

Jim Steyer

James P. SteyerJim
The next year, Jim Steyer, the CEO of Common Sense Media, has called for updates to COPPA, calling the time of the act's creation "the stone age of digital media" and pointing out the lack of platforms such as Google, YouTube, Facebook and Twitter at the time.
Steyer has also called for updates to the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA), calling the time of the act's creation "the stone age of digital media" and pointing out the lack of platforms such as Google, YouTube, Facebook and Twitter at the time.

General Data Protection Regulation

GDPRGeneral Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)General Data Protection Regulation 2016
In contrast, violators of the European Union's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) may be fined up to 4% of their annual global revenue.

Online Privacy Protection Act

California Online Privacy Protection ActCalifornia Online Privacy Protection Act (OPPA)California Online Privacy Protection Act (OPPA) of 2003

Law of the United States

United States federal lawUnited States lawAmerican lawyer
The Children's Online Privacy Protection Act of 1998 (COPPA) is a United States federal law, located at.

Jurisdiction

jurisdictionsjurisdictionallegal jurisdiction
The act, effective April 21, 2000, applies to the online collection of personal information by persons or entities under U.S. jurisdiction about children under 13 years of age including children outside the U.S., if the company is U.S.-based.

Child

childrenschoolchildrenkids
The act, effective April 21, 2000, applies to the online collection of personal information by persons or entities under U.S. jurisdiction about children under 13 years of age including children outside the U.S., if the company is U.S.-based.

Website

web sitewebsitesonline
It details what a website operator must include in a privacy policy, when and how to seek verifiable consent from a parent or guardian, and what responsibilities an operator has to protect children's privacy and safety online including restrictions on the marketing of those under 13.

Parent

parentspaternitybiological parent
It details what a website operator must include in a privacy policy, when and how to seek verifiable consent from a parent or guardian, and what responsibilities an operator has to protect children's privacy and safety online including restrictions on the marketing of those under 13.

Legal guardian

guardianguardianshipguardian ad litem
It details what a website operator must include in a privacy policy, when and how to seek verifiable consent from a parent or guardian, and what responsibilities an operator has to protect children's privacy and safety online including restrictions on the marketing of those under 13.

Social media

socialsocial media platformsocial media campaign
While children under 13 can legally give out personal information with their parents' permission, many websites—particularly social media sites, but also other sites that collect most personal info—disallow children under 13 from using their services altogether due to the cost and work involved in complying with the law.

Data collection

collectioncollection of datadata gathering
In the 1990s, electronic commerce was on its rise, but various concerns were expressed about the data collection practices and the impact of Internet commerce on user privacy - especially children under 13, because very few websites had their own privacy policies.

Kidscom.com

Center of Media Education petitioned the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to investigate the data collection and use practices of the KidsCom.com website, and take legal action since the data practices violated Section 5 of FTC Act concerning "unfair/deceptive practices".

Aristotle, Inc.

Aristotle
the FTC has approved seven safe harbor programs operated by TRUSTe, ESRB, CARU, PRIVO, Aristotle, Inc., Samet Privacy (kidSAFE), and the Internet Keep Safe Coalition (iKeepSafe).