Chinese grammarwikipedia
For the grammars of other forms or varieties of Chinese, see their respective articles via links on Chinese language and varieties of Chinese.''
ChineseChinese aspectsChinese aspect markersgrammar of Standard Chineselocative noun phraseinner" and "outer" objectsMandarin Chinesesentence-final particleChinese grammar → Relative clausesChinese grammar: Aspects

Adjective

adjectiveadjectivesadjectival
Predicate adjectives are normally used without a copular verb ("to be"), and can thus be regarded as a type of verb.
Such an analysis is possible for the grammar of Standard Chinese, for example.

Preposition and postposition

prepositionpostpositionprepositions
Chinese prepositions behave similarly to serialized verbs in some respects (several of the common prepositions can also be used as full verbs), and they are often referred to as coverbs.
The Chinese example could be analyzed as a prepositional phrase headed by cóng ("from"), taking the locative noun phrase bīngxīang lǐ ("refrigerator inside") as its complement.

Classifier (linguistics)

classifierclassifiersnoun classifier
Chinese nouns require classifiers (also termed measure words, in Chinese 量词[量詞] liàngcí) in order to be counted.
(Plurals of Chinese nouns are not normally marked in any way; the same form of the noun is used for both singular and plural.)

Head-directionality parameter

head-finalhead-initialhead final
Otherwise, Chinese is chiefly a head-last language, meaning that modifiers precede the words they modify – in a noun phrase, for example, the head noun comes last, and all modifiers, including relative clauses, come in front of it. (This phenomenon is more typically found in SOV languages like Turkish and Japanese.)
For more details and examples of the relevant structures, see Chinese grammar.

Grammatical tense

tensetensesgrammatical tense
Categories such as number (singular or plural) and verb tense are frequently not expressed by any grammatical means, although there are several particles that serve to express verbal aspect, and to some extent mood.
Languages that do not have grammatical tense, such as Chinese, express time reference chiefly by lexical means – through adverbials, time phrases, and so on. (The same is done in tensed languages, to supplement or reinforce the time information conveyed by the choice of tense.) Time information is also sometimes conveyed as a secondary feature by markers of other categories, as with the Chinese aspect markers le and guo, which in most cases place an action in past time.

Serial verb construction

serial verb constructionserial verbverb serialization
Chinese frequently uses serial verb constructions, which involve two or more verbs or verb phrases in sequence.
In Chinese, as in Southeast Asian languages, when a transitive verb is followed by an intransitive verb, the object of the combined verb may be understood as the object of the first verb and the subject of the second: 老虎咬死了張 lǎohǔ yǎo-sǐ le zhāng (lit.

Object (grammar)

objectdirect objectindirect object
Chinese (like English) is classified as an SVO (subject–verb–object) language, because transitive verbs precede their objects in typical simple clauses, while the subject precedes the verb.
Some Chinese verbs can have two direct objects, one being more closely bound to the verb than the other; these may be called "inner" and "outer" objects.

Verb

verbverbsv.
Most two-syllable compound nouns have the head on the right, while in compound verbs the head is usually on the left.

Chinese particles

particleparticlesgrammatical particle
Categories such as number (singular or plural) and verb tense are frequently not expressed by any grammatical means, although there are several particles that serve to express verbal aspect, and to some extent mood.

A-not-A question

A-not-A
An alternative is the A-not-A construction, using phrases like 吃不吃 chī bu chī ("eat or not eat") (either the verb or the whole verb phrase may be repeated after the negator bù; it is also possible to place bù after the verb phrase and omit the repetition entirely).
In Chinese, there are 6 attested patterns of A-not-A: A-not-A, AB-not-AB, A-not-AB, AB-not-A, a-not-A, and a-not-AB of which "A" stands for the full form of the predicate, "B" stands for the complement, and "a" stands for the first syllable of a disyllabic predicate.

Grammatical aspect

aspectgrammatical aspectaspectual
Categories such as number (singular or plural) and verb tense are frequently not expressed by any grammatical means, although there are several particles that serve to express verbal aspect, and to some extent mood. There are two aspect markers that are especially commonly used with past events: the perfective 了 le and the experiential 过 [過] guo.

Standard Chinese phonology

four tonestoneneutral tone
There is a strong tendency for monosyllables to be avoided in certain positions (for example, a disyllabic verb will not normally be followed by a monosyllabic object) – this may be connected with the preferred metrical structure of the language.
Weak syllables are usually grammatical markers such as 了 le, or the second syllables of some compound words (although many other compounds consist of two or more full syllables).

Copula (linguistics)

copulato becopular
Predicate adjectives are normally used without a copular verb ("to be"), and can thus be regarded as a type of verb.
See also Chinese adjectives, and Chinese grammar.

Chinese classifier

measure wordclassifierclassifiers
As in many east Asian languages, classifiers or measure words are required when using numerals (and sometimes other words such as demonstratives) with nouns.

Coverb

coverbverbal prefixAuxiliaries
Chinese prepositions behave similarly to serialized verbs in some respects (several of the common prepositions can also be used as full verbs), and they are often referred to as coverbs.
For more information, see the article on Chinese grammar, particularly the sections on coverbs and locative phrases.

Cleft sentence

cleftingcleft sentencecleft
There is a construction in Chinese known as the shì ... (de) construction, which produces what may be called cleft sentences.
See Chinese grammar → Cleft sentences for details.

Delimitative aspect

durativedurative aspectDelimitative
The delimitative aspect denotes an action that goes on only for some time, "doing something 'a little bit'".
For details see Chinese grammar → Aspects.

Chinese pronouns

personal pronouns
It is used with personal pronouns, as in 我们 [我們] wǒmen, meaning "we" or "us" (from 我 wǒ, "I, me"), and can be used with nouns representing humans, most commonly those with two syllables, like in 朋友们 [朋友們] péngyoumén "friends" (from 朋友 péngyou "friend").

Perfective aspect

perfectiveperfective aspectperfect
There are two aspect markers that are especially commonly used with past events: the perfective 了 le and the experiential 过 [過] guo.

Postpositive adjective

postpositive adjectivepost-positive adjectivePost-positive
In many other languages, including English, German, Russian and Chinese, prepositive adjectives are the norm (attributive adjectives normally come before the nouns they modify), and adjectives appear postpositively only in special situations, if at all.

Past tense

past tensepastpast-tense
Not all languages grammaticalise verbs for past tense – Mandarin Chinese, for example, mainly uses lexical means (words like "yesterday" or "last week") to indicate that something took place in the past, although use can also be made of the tense/aspect markers le and guo.

Zhulong (mythology)

ZhulongZhuyin
It describes the act of "shining" or "illuminating" something but, owing to the nature of Chinese grammar, can function as a verb ("to shine", "to illuminate"), an adjective ("shining", "bright"), or a noun ("light", "illumination", an object which illuminates) depending upon its position in a phrase.

Liang Fa

His personal name undefined is the common Chinese verb for "to send" but in Chinese grammar can also be understood as its past participle, "[he who is] sent".