Chinook wind

Chinookchinook windschinookschinook archa local windLil'wat account of the Chinook Windthe Chinookswindy climate
Chinook winds, or simply Chinooks, are föhn winds in the interior West of North America, where the Canadian Prairies and Great Plains meet various mountain ranges, although the original usage is in reference to wet, warm coastal winds in the Pacific Northwest.wikipedia
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Alberta

ABAlberta, CanadaALB
Chinooks are most prevalent over southern Alberta in Canada, especially in a belt from Pincher Creek and Crowsnest Pass through Lethbridge, which get 30–35 Chinook days per year, on average.
It has a predominantly humid continental climate, with stark contrasts over a year; but seasonal temperature average swings are smaller than in areas further east, due to winters being warmed by occasional chinook winds bringing sudden warming.

Foehn wind

föhnfoehnföhn wind
Chinook winds, or simply Chinooks, are föhn winds in the interior West of North America, where the Canadian Prairies and Great Plains meet various mountain ranges, although the original usage is in reference to wet, warm coastal winds in the Pacific Northwest. The Chinook is a föhn wind, a rain shadow wind which results from the subsequent adiabatic warming of air which has dropped most of its moisture on windward slopes (orographic lift).
Evidence for effects from Chinook winds remain anecdotal.

Lethbridge

Lethbridge, AlbertaLethbridge, ABCity of Lethbridge
Chinooks are most prevalent over southern Alberta in Canada, especially in a belt from Pincher Creek and Crowsnest Pass through Lethbridge, which get 30–35 Chinook days per year, on average.
The nearby Canadian Rockies contribute to the city's warm summers, mild winters, and windy climate.

Pincher Creek

Town of Pincher Creek
Chinooks are most prevalent over southern Alberta in Canada, especially in a belt from Pincher Creek and Crowsnest Pass through Lethbridge, which get 30–35 Chinook days per year, on average.
Strong Chinook winds often blow off the mountains and Pincher Creek can be extremely windy.

British Columbia

BCB.C.British Columbia, Canada
Chinooks become less frequent further south in the United States, and are not as common north of Red Deer, but they can and do occur annually as far north as High Level in northwestern Alberta and Fort St. John in northeastern British Columbia, and as far south as Las Vegas, Nevada, and occasionally to Carlsbad, in eastern New Mexico.
Atlin in the province's far northwest, along with the adjoining Southern Lakes region of Yukon, get midwinter thaws caused by the Chinook effect, which is also common (and much warmer) in more southerly parts of the Interior.

Calgary

Calgary, AlbertaCalgary, ABCalgary, Alberta, Canada
Calgary, Alberta also gets many Chinooks – the Bow Valley in the Canadian Rockies west of the city acts as a natural wind tunnel, funneling the chinook winds.
Winters are cold and the air temperature can drop to or below -20 C on average of 22 days of the year and -30 C on average of 3.7 days of the year, and are often broken up by warm, dry Chinook winds that blow into Alberta over the mountains.

Loma, Montana

Loma
The greatest recorded temperature change in 24 hours was caused by Chinook winds on 15 January 1972, in Loma, Montana; the temperature rose from −48 to 9 °C (−54 to 49 °F).
On January 15, 1972, the temperature rose from -54 F to 49 F; a dramatic example of the regional Chinook wind in action.

Cardston

Town of CardstonCardston, Alberta[Cardston
It is not unheard of for people in Lethbridge to complain of -20 C temperatures while those in Cardston, just 77 km down the road, enjoy 10 C temperatures.
Cardston experiences a humid continental climate (Köppen climate classification Dfb). Along with the rest of southern Alberta, Cardston is subject to chinooks, which often bring temperatures in mid-winter well above 10 C. This same pattern results in more than 200 days of wind a year.

Pineapple Express

rains of 2005
The winds are also known as the pineapple express, since they are of tropical origin, roughly from the area of the Pacific near Hawaii.
After being drained of their moisture, the tropical air masses reach the inland prairies as a Chinook wind or simply "a Chinook", a term which is also synonymous in the Pacific Northwest with the Pineapple Express.

Adiabatic process

adiabaticadiabaticallyadiabatic cooling
The Chinook is a föhn wind, a rain shadow wind which results from the subsequent adiabatic warming of air which has dropped most of its moisture on windward slopes (orographic lift).
Adiabatic heating occurs in the Earth's atmosphere when an air mass descends, for example, in a katabatic wind, Foehn wind, or chinook wind flowing downhill over a mountain range.

Oregon

ORState of OregonOregon, U.S.
The word "Chinook" is in common usage among local fishermen and people in communities along the British Columbia Coast and coastal Washington and Oregon.
One theory is that the name comes from the French word ouragan ("windstorm" or "hurricane"), which was applied to the River of the West based on Native American tales of powerful Chinook winds on the lower Columbia River, or perhaps from firsthand French experience with the Chinook winds of the Great Plains.

Claresholm

Claresholm, AlbertaTown of Claresholm
On 27 February 1992, Claresholm, Alberta a small city just south of Calgary; recorded a temperature of 24 C again the next day 21 C was recorded.
During winter, Chinook winds have been known to move temperatures from well below freezing to well above in a matter of hours.

Washington (state)

WashingtonWashington StateWA
The word "Chinook" is in common usage among local fishermen and people in communities along the British Columbia Coast and coastal Washington and Oregon.
The air spiraling inward in a counter-clockwise fashion causes Washington's prevailing winds, the Chinooks, to come from the southwest, and bring relatively warm and moist air masses and a predictably wet season.

Chinookan peoples

ChinookChinookanChinook Indian Nation
The reference to a wind or weather system, simply 'a Chinook', originally meant a warming wind from the ocean into the interior regions of the Pacific Northwest of the USA (the Chinook people lived near the ocean, along the lower Columbia River).
Chinook (wind)

Orographic lift

orographicorographic liftingrelief precipitation
The Chinook is a föhn wind, a rain shadow wind which results from the subsequent adiabatic warming of air which has dropped most of its moisture on windward slopes (orographic lift). One of its most striking features is the Chinook arch, a föhn cloud in the form of a band of stationary stratus clouds caused by air rippling over the mountains due to orographic lifting.
The warm foehn wind, locally known as the Chinook wind, Bergwind or Diablo wind or Nor'wester depending on the region, provide examples of this type of wind, and are driven in part by latent heat released by orographic-lifting-induced precipitation.

Spearfish, South Dakota

Spearfish
On 22 January 1943, at about 7:30 am MST, the temperature in Spearfish, South Dakota, was −4 °F (−20 °C).
The Chinook wind picked up speed rapidly, and two minutes later (7:32 a.m.) the temperature was +45 °F (+7 °C) above zero.

Katabatic wind

katabatic windsdownslope winddownsloping
Catabatic wind
For instance, winds such as the föhn, chinook, and bergwind are rain shadow winds where air driven upslope on the windward side of a mountain range drops its moisture and descends leeward drier and warmer.

Squamish (wind)

squamishsquamish wind
These are called a squamish in certain areas, rooted in the direction of such winds coming down out of Howe Sound, home to the Squamish people, and in Alaska are called a williwaw.
Chinook wind

Santa Ana winds

Santa AnaSanta AnasSanta Ana conditions
Santa Ana winds
These result from precipitation on the windward side of a mountain range which releases latent heat into the atmosphere which is then warmer on the leeward side (e.g., the Chinook or the original Föhn).

Nor'west arch

Nor'westerChristchurch weather patternNor'west wind
Nor'west arch
Closer to the Canterbury coast, some distance from the mountains of the Southern Alps, it appears as a clear area of blue above the mountains, with white cloud streaming to the east from it. The phenomenon is similar to the Chinook arch seen in the Pacific regions of the United States and Canada.

Great Plains

plainsCentral Plainshigh plains
Chinook winds, or simply Chinooks, are föhn winds in the interior West of North America, where the Canadian Prairies and Great Plains meet various mountain ranges, although the original usage is in reference to wet, warm coastal winds in the Pacific Northwest.

Pacific Northwest

northwestNorthwest CoastCascadia
Chinook winds, or simply Chinooks, are föhn winds in the interior West of North America, where the Canadian Prairies and Great Plains meet various mountain ranges, although the original usage is in reference to wet, warm coastal winds in the Pacific Northwest. The reference to a wind or weather system, simply 'a Chinook', originally meant a warming wind from the ocean into the interior regions of the Pacific Northwest of the USA (the Chinook people lived near the ocean, along the lower Columbia River).

Columbia River

ColumbiaColumbia basinLower Columbia
The reference to a wind or weather system, simply 'a Chinook', originally meant a warming wind from the ocean into the interior regions of the Pacific Northwest of the USA (the Chinook people lived near the ocean, along the lower Columbia River).

Temperature

temperaturesair temperaturewarm
Chinook winds have been observed to raise winter temperature, often from below −20 °C (−4 °F) to as high as 10–20 °C (50–68 °F) for a few hours or days, then temperatures plummet to their base levels.

Crowsnest Pass, Alberta

Crowsnest PassMunicipality of Crowsnest PassCrowsnest Pass (municipality)
Chinooks are most prevalent over southern Alberta in Canada, especially in a belt from Pincher Creek and Crowsnest Pass through Lethbridge, which get 30–35 Chinook days per year, on average.