Chittagong Hill Tracts

Chittagong HillsCHTChittagongChittagong and Hill Tracts areaChittagong Hill Tract RegionChittagong Hill-TractsHill TractsHill Tracts Districtsoutheastern
The Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT; পার্বত্য চট্টগ্রাম, Parbotto Choŧŧogram; or the Hill Tracts for short) are an area within the Chattogram Division in southeastern Bangladesh, bordering India and Myanmar (Burma).wikipedia
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Chittagong Division

Chittagongdivision of ChittagongChattogram Division
The Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT; পার্বত্য চট্টগ্রাম, Parbotto Choŧŧogram; or the Hill Tracts for short) are an area within the Chattogram Division in southeastern Bangladesh, bordering India and Myanmar (Burma).
The administrative division includes mainland Chittagong District, neighbouring districts and the Chittagong Hill Tracts.

Bandarban District

BandarbanBandarban Stadium01
Covering 13295 km2, they formed a single district until 1984, when they were divided into three districts: Khagrachari District, Rangamati Hill District, and Bandarban District.
It is one of the three hill districts of Bangladesh and a part of the Chittagong Hill Tracts, the others being Rangamati District and Khagrachhari District.

Bangladesh

People's Republic of BangladeshBangladeshiBangla Desh
The Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT; পার্বত্য চট্টগ্রাম, Parbotto Choŧŧogram; or the Hill Tracts for short) are an area within the Chattogram Division in southeastern Bangladesh, bordering India and Myanmar (Burma).
The Pakistani government built the controversial Kaptai Dam, displacing the Chakma people from their indigenous homeland in the Chittagong Hill Tracts.

Chakma people

ChakmaChakmasChakma Circle
The tribal populations include the Chakma, Marma, Tripura, Tanchangya, indigenous Assamese, Keot (Kaibarta), Chak, Pankho, Mro, Murang, Bom, Lushei, Khyang, and Khumi, and differ markedly from the Bengali majority of Bangladesh with respect to language, culture, physical appearance, religion, dress and farming methods. Administratively, the Chittagong Hill Tracts were divided into three circles, namely the Chakma Circle, the Bohmong Circle, and the Mong Circle, each presided over by a hereditary chief from the Chakma and Marma peoples.
The Chakma people are the largest ethnic group in the Chittagong Hill Tracts region in southeastern Bangladesh, second largest in Mizoram (Chakma Autonomous District Council) and fourth largest in Tripura of North East India.

Bengalis

BengaliBengali peopleIndian Bengali
According to the census of 1991, the population was 974,447, of which 501,114 were tribal peoples and the rest were from Bengali (Muslim and Hindu) community. About 34% of the population are tribal peoples and mainly followers of Theravada Buddhism; 65% of the inhabitants are Bengalis (Muslims and Hindus); and 1% Christians or animists.
Apart from Bangladesh and the Indian states of West Bengal, Tripura, Assam's Barak Valley, Bengali-majority populations also reside in India's union territory of Andaman and Nicobar Islands as well as Bangladesh's Chittagong Hill Tracts (which was originally not a part of Bengal), with significant populations in Arunachal Pradesh, Delhi, Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland and Uttarakhand.

Marma people

MarmaMarma descentBohmong
The tribal populations include the Chakma, Marma, Tripura, Tanchangya, indigenous Assamese, Keot (Kaibarta), Chak, Pankho, Mro, Murang, Bom, Lushei, Khyang, and Khumi, and differ markedly from the Bengali majority of Bangladesh with respect to language, culture, physical appearance, religion, dress and farming methods. Administratively, the Chittagong Hill Tracts were divided into three circles, namely the Chakma Circle, the Bohmong Circle, and the Mong Circle, each presided over by a hereditary chief from the Chakma and Marma peoples.
The Marma people, formerly known as Moghs or Maghs, are the second-largest ethnic community in Bangladesh's Chittagong Hill Tracts, primarily residing in the Bandarban, Khagrachari and Rangamati Hill Districts.

Khagrachhari District

KhagrachariKhagrachari DistrictKhagrachhari
Covering 13295 km2, they formed a single district until 1984, when they were divided into three districts: Khagrachari District, Rangamati Hill District, and Bandarban District.
Khagrachhari, also known as Chengmi (Chakma:𑄌𑄬𑄋𑄴𑄟𑄩) is a district in Chittagong Division, south-eastern Bangladesh and the Chittagong Hill Tracts.

Tanchangya people

TanchangyaTongchangya Tanchangya
The tribal populations include the Chakma, Marma, Tripura, Tanchangya, indigenous Assamese, Keot (Kaibarta), Chak, Pankho, Mro, Murang, Bom, Lushei, Khyang, and Khumi, and differ markedly from the Bengali majority of Bangladesh with respect to language, culture, physical appearance, religion, dress and farming methods.
The Tanchangya people or Tanchangyas are indigenous ethnic group living in the Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT) of Bangladesh.

Pankho people

Pankho
The tribal populations include the Chakma, Marma, Tripura, Tanchangya, indigenous Assamese, Keot (Kaibarta), Chak, Pankho, Mro, Murang, Bom, Lushei, Khyang, and Khumi, and differ markedly from the Bengali majority of Bangladesh with respect to language, culture, physical appearance, religion, dress and farming methods.
The Pankhos, are a community inhabiting the Chittagong Hill Tracts of Bangladesh and also in India with a population of only 3,227 in Bangladesh according to the 1991 census.

Chak people

Chak
The tribal populations include the Chakma, Marma, Tripura, Tanchangya, indigenous Assamese, Keot (Kaibarta), Chak, Pankho, Mro, Murang, Bom, Lushei, Khyang, and Khumi, and differ markedly from the Bengali majority of Bangladesh with respect to language, culture, physical appearance, religion, dress and farming methods.
The Chaks, are a community inhabiting the Chittagong Hill Tracts of Bangladesh and also in Burma.

Bawm people

BawmBom peopleBawms
The tribal populations include the Chakma, Marma, Tripura, Tanchangya, indigenous Assamese, Keot (Kaibarta), Chak, Pankho, Mro, Murang, Bom, Lushei, Khyang, and Khumi, and differ markedly from the Bengali majority of Bangladesh with respect to language, culture, physical appearance, religion, dress and farming methods.
The Bom, or Bawm, are an ethnic community inhabiting the Chittagong Hill Tracts of Bangladesh.

Khyang people

Khyang
The tribal populations include the Chakma, Marma, Tripura, Tanchangya, indigenous Assamese, Keot (Kaibarta), Chak, Pankho, Mro, Murang, Bom, Lushei, Khyang, and Khumi, and differ markedly from the Bengali majority of Bangladesh with respect to language, culture, physical appearance, religion, dress and farming methods.
There Kheyang or the Hyow, are a group of indigenous people inhabiting in the Chittagong Hill Tracts of Bangladesh and the Rakhine State of Myanmar.

Khumi people

Khumi
The tribal populations include the Chakma, Marma, Tripura, Tanchangya, indigenous Assamese, Keot (Kaibarta), Chak, Pankho, Mro, Murang, Bom, Lushei, Khyang, and Khumi, and differ markedly from the Bengali majority of Bangladesh with respect to language, culture, physical appearance, religion, dress and farming methods.
The Khumis, are a community inhabiting in the Chittagong Hill Tracts of Bangladesh.

Rangamati Hill District

Rangamati DistrictRangamati56
Covering 13295 km2, they formed a single district until 1984, when they were divided into three districts: Khagrachari District, Rangamati Hill District, and Bandarban District.
*Chittagong Hill Tracts

Chittagong

ChattogramChittagong, BangladeshChittagong City
Situated beyond the inland hills, Chittagong proper is a coastal area in the plains where the British were based.
The city is located on the banks of the Karnaphuli River between the Chittagong Hill Tracts and the Bay of Bengal.

Chakma Circle

Chakma Raja Chakma Chakma Raj
Administratively, the Chittagong Hill Tracts were divided into three circles, namely the Chakma Circle, the Bohmong Circle, and the Mong Circle, each presided over by a hereditary chief from the Chakma and Marma peoples.
The Chakma Circle, also known as the Chakma Raj, is one of three hereditary chiefdoms (or "circles") in the Chittagong Hill Tracts of modern-day Bangladesh.

Bohmong Circle

Bohmong Bohmong Bohmong Htaung
Administratively, the Chittagong Hill Tracts were divided into three circles, namely the Chakma Circle, the Bohmong Circle, and the Mong Circle, each presided over by a hereditary chief from the Chakma and Marma peoples.
The Bohmong Circle is one of three hereditary chiefdoms (or "circles") in the Chittagong Hill Tracts of modern-day Bangladesh.

Bengal

Bengal regionBengal, IndiaBengali
In 1860 it was annexed by the British and was made an administrative district of Bengal.
The Chittagong Hill Tracts and Sylhet regions are home to most of the mountains in Bangladesh.

Mong Circle

Mong
Administratively, the Chittagong Hill Tracts were divided into three circles, namely the Chakma Circle, the Bohmong Circle, and the Mong Circle, each presided over by a hereditary chief from the Chakma and Marma peoples.
The Mong Circle is one of three hereditary chiefdoms (or "circles") in the Chittagong Hill Tracts of modern-day Bangladesh.

Murang people

Murang
The tribal populations include the Chakma, Marma, Tripura, Tanchangya, indigenous Assamese, Keot (Kaibarta), Chak, Pankho, Mro, Murang, Bom, Lushei, Khyang, and Khumi, and differ markedly from the Bengali majority of Bangladesh with respect to language, culture, physical appearance, religion, dress and farming methods.
The Murang people are a tribe living in the Chittagong Hill Tracts of Bangladesh.

Parbatya Chattagram Jana Samhati Samiti

Parbatya Chattagram Jana Sanghati SamitiParbattya Chattagram Jana Sanghati Samitifactions
The 1997 Chittagong Hill Tracts Peace Accord signed between the then Sheikh Hasina government and the Parbatya Chattagram Jana Samhati Samiti has been opposed by the opposition parties as well as a fraction of the tribal rebels.
The Parbatya Chattagram Jana Samhati Samiti (পার্বত্য চট্টগ্রাম জনসংহতি সমিতি; United People's Party of the Chittagong Hill Tracts; abbreviated PCJSS) is a political party formed to represent the people and indigenous tribes of the Chittagong Hill Tracts in Bangladesh.

Chittagong Hill Tracts Peace Accord

1996 peace treatyChattogram Hill Tracts Peace AccordChittagong Hill Tracts Peace Treaty
The 1997 Chittagong Hill Tracts Peace Accord signed between the then Sheikh Hasina government and the Parbatya Chattagram Jana Samhati Samiti has been opposed by the opposition parties as well as a fraction of the tribal rebels.
The accord allowed for the recognition of the rights of the peoples and tribes of the Chittagong Hill Tracts region and ended the decades-long insurgency between the Shanti Bahini and government forces.

Mru people (Mrucha)

MruMrosMro
The tribal populations include the Chakma, Marma, Tripura, Tanchangya, indigenous Assamese, Keot (Kaibarta), Chak, Pankho, Mro, Murang, Bom, Lushei, Khyang, and Khumi, and differ markedly from the Bengali majority of Bangladesh with respect to language, culture, physical appearance, religion, dress and farming methods.

Theravada

Theravada BuddhismTheravādaTheravada Buddhist
About 34% of the population are tribal peoples and mainly followers of Theravada Buddhism; 65% of the inhabitants are Bengalis (Muslims and Hindus); and 1% Christians or animists.

India

IndianRepublic of IndiaIND
The Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT; পার্বত্য চট্টগ্রাম, Parbotto Choŧŧogram; or the Hill Tracts for short) are an area within the Chattogram Division in southeastern Bangladesh, bordering India and Myanmar (Burma).