William Morris by Frederick Hollyer, 1887
Yvain fighting Gawain in order to regain the love of his lady Laudine. Medieval illumination from Chrétien de Troyes's romance, Yvain, le Chevalier au Lion
Water House, Morris's childhood home; renovated in 2012, it now houses The William Morris Gallery
Holger Danske, or Ogier the Dane, from the Matter of France
William Morris at 23
A knight rescues a lady from a dragon.
William Morris self-portrait, 1856; Morris grew his beard that year, after leaving university.
Morris's 1858 painting La belle Iseult, also inaccurately called Queen Guinevere, is his only surviving easel painting, now in the Tate Gallery. The model is Jane Burden, who married Morris in 1859.
Red House in Bexleyheath; it is now owned by The National Trust and open to visitors
Design for Trellis wallpaper, 1862
Portrait of William Morris by George Frederic Watts, 1870.
A caricature sketch of Morris by Rossetti, The Bard and Petty Tradesman, reflecting his behaviour at the Firm
Main Entrance to Kelmscott Manor
Portrait of William Morris by William Blake Richmond
The Pond at Merton Abbey by Lexden Lewis Pocock is an idyllic representation of the works in the time of Morris
David's Charge to Solomon (1882), a stained-glass window by Edward Burne-Jones and William Morris in Trinity Church, Boston, Massachusetts.
Morris (right) with Burne-Jones, 1890
Morris's design for the Kelmscott Press trademark
The Salutation of Beatrice, Jane Morris portrayed by Dante Gabriel Rossetti as Dante Alighieri's muse, Beatrice, 1869
A Wooden Pattern for Textile Printing from William Morris's Company
Morris family tombstone at Kelmscott, designed by Webb
The blue plaque erected outside the Red House
Morris's essay "Printing" as reprinted by the Village Press in Chicago run by Will Ransom and Frederic Goudy, c. 1903
All Saints, Middleton Cheney, Northamptonshire
All Saints, Middleton Cheney – Solomon
William Morris King Arthur and Sir Lancelot, (1862)
William Morris Queen Guenevere and Isoude, (1862)
Detail, William Morris window, Cattistock Church, (1882).
Detail from The Worship of the Shepherds window (1882).
Burne-Jones-designed and Morris & Co.-executed Saint Cecilia window at Second Presbyterian Church (Chicago, Illinois)
Burne-Jones-designed and Morris & Co.-executed Luce Memorial Window in Malmesbury Abbey, Malmesbury, Wiltshire, England (1901).
Design for Windrush printed textile, 1881–1883
Acanthus embroidered panel, designed Morris, 1890
Strawberry Thief, furnishing fabric, designed Morris, 1883
Morris Strawberry Thief 1883 detail
Wallpaper – Hyacinth, pattern #480 – 1915–1917
Wallpaper – Blackberry, pattern #388 – 1915–1917
Detail of a watercolour design for the Little Flower carpet showing a portion of the central medallion, by William Morris
Panel of ceramic tiles designed by Morris and produced by William De Morgan, 1876
The Vision of the Holy Grail tapestry, 1890
Kelmscott Press typefaces and colophon, 1897
William Morris, publisher

Their influence on authors such as J. R. R. Tolkien, William Morris and Poul Anderson and on the subsequent modern fantasy genre is considerable.

- Chivalric romance

These were attempts to revive the genre of medieval romance, and written inimitation of medieval prose.

- William Morris
William Morris by Frederick Hollyer, 1887

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Tapestry showing Arthur as one of the Nine Worthies, wearing a coat of arms often attributed to him

King Arthur

Tapestry showing Arthur as one of the Nine Worthies, wearing a coat of arms often attributed to him
Arthur defeats the Saxons in a 19th-century picture by John Cassell
"Arturus rex" (King Arthur), a 1493 illustration from the Nuremberg Chronicle
A facsimile page of Y Gododdin, one of the most famous early Welsh texts featuring Arthur
Culhwch entering Arthur's court in the Welsh tale Culhwch and Olwen. An illustration by Alfred Fredericks for a 1881 edition of the Mabinogion
King Arthur in a crude illustration from a 15th-century Welsh version of Historia Regum Britanniae
The Death of Arthur by John Garrick (1862), depicting a boat arriving to take the dying Arthur to Avalon after the Battle of Camlann
During the 12th century, Arthur's character began to be marginalised by the accretion of "Arthurian" side-stories such as that of Tristan and Iseult, here pictured in a painting by John William Waterhouse (1916)
The story of Arthur drawing the sword from a stone appeared in Robert de Boron's 13th-century Merlin. By Howard Pyle (1903)
The Round Table experiences a vision of the Holy Grail, an illumination by Évrard d'Espinques
Arthur receiving the later tradition's sword Excalibur in N. C. Wyeth's illustration for The Boy's King Arthur (1922), a modern edition of Thomas Malory's 1485 Le Morte d'Arthur
Merlin and Viviane in Gustave Doré's 1868 illustration for Alfred, Lord Tennyson's Idylls of the King
King Arthur (holding Excalibur) and Patsy in Spamalot, a stage musical adaptation of the 1975 film Monty Python and the Holy Grail

King Arthur (Brenin Arthur, Arthur Gernow, Roue Arzhur) was a legendary British leader who, according to medieval histories and romances, led the defence of Britain against Saxon invaders in the late 5th and early 6th centuries.

This interest in the "Arthur of romance" and his associated stories continued through the 19th century and into the 20th, and influenced poets such as William Morris and Pre-Raphaelite artists including Edward Burne-Jones.

The Middle Ages in art: a Pre-Raphaelite painting of a knight and a mythical seductress, the lamia (Lamia by John William Waterhouse, 1905)

Medievalism

System of belief and practice inspired by the Middle Ages of Europe, or by devotion to elements of that period, which have been expressed in areas such as architecture, literature, music, art, philosophy, scholarship, and various vehicles of popular culture.

System of belief and practice inspired by the Middle Ages of Europe, or by devotion to elements of that period, which have been expressed in areas such as architecture, literature, music, art, philosophy, scholarship, and various vehicles of popular culture.

The Middle Ages in art: a Pre-Raphaelite painting of a knight and a mythical seductress, the lamia (Lamia by John William Waterhouse, 1905)
Voltaire, one of the key Enlightenment critics of the medieval era
William Blake's The Lovers' Whirlwind illustrates Hell in Canto V of Dante's Inferno.
Jacob encountering Rachel with her father's herd by Joseph von Führich 1836
Notable Neo-Gothic edifices: top – Palace of Westminster, London; left – Cathedral of Learning, Pittsburgh; right – Sint-Petrus-en-Pauluskerk, Ostend
Ludwig II of Bavaria built a fairy-tale castle at Neuschwanstein in 1868 (later appropriated by Walt Disney) as a symbolic merger of art and politics. (Photochrom from the 1890s)
"Artichoke" wallpaper, by John Henry Dearle for Morris & Co., circa 1897 (Victoria and Albert Museum)
Douglas Fairbanks as Robin Hood
2003 re-enactment of the Battle of Grunwald
A re-enactment during the traditional Medieval Market Festival of Turku in summer 2006.

The name "Romanticism" itself was derived from the medieval genre chivalric romance.

The movement was inspired by the writings of the critic John Ruskin and spearheaded by the work of William Morris, a friend of the Pre-Raphaelites and a former apprentice to Gothic-revival architect G. E. Street.