A report on Chivalric romance

Yvain fighting Gawain in order to regain the love of his lady Laudine. Medieval illumination from Chrétien de Troyes's romance, Yvain, le Chevalier au Lion
Holger Danske, or Ogier the Dane, from the Matter of France
A knight rescues a lady from a dragon.

Type of prose and verse narrative that was popular in the noble courts of High Medieval and Early Modern Europe.

- Chivalric romance
Yvain fighting Gawain in order to regain the love of his lady Laudine. Medieval illumination from Chrétien de Troyes's romance, Yvain, le Chevalier au Lion

63 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Map of France in 1180, at the height of the feudal system.
The possessions of the French king are in light blue, vassals to the French king in green, Angevin possessions in red. Shown in white is the Holy Roman Empire to the east, the western fringes of which, including Upper Burgundy and Lorraine, were also part of the Old French areal.

Old French

3 links

The language spoken in most of the northern half of France from approximately the 8th to the 14th centuries.

The language spoken in most of the northern half of France from approximately the 8th to the 14th centuries.

Map of France in 1180, at the height of the feudal system.
The possessions of the French king are in light blue, vassals to the French king in green, Angevin possessions in red. Shown in white is the Holy Roman Empire to the east, the western fringes of which, including Upper Burgundy and Lorraine, were also part of the Old French areal.
Distribution of the modern langue d'oïl (shades of green) and of Franco-Provençal dialects (shades of blue)

At the beginning of the 13th century, Jean Bodel, in his Chanson de Saisnes, divided medieval French narrative literature into three subject areas: the Matter of France or Matter of Charlemagne; the Matter of Rome (romances in an ancient setting); and the Matter of Britain (Arthurian romances and Breton lais).

A portrait of a fairy, by Sophie Gengembre Anderson (1869). The title of the painting is Take the Fair Face of Woman, and Gently Suspending, With Butterflies, Flowers, and Jewels Attending, Thus Your Fairy is Made of Most Beautiful Things (purportedly taken from a poem by Charles Ede).

Fairy

2 links

Type of mythical being or legendary creature found in the folklore of multiple European cultures (including Celtic, Slavic, Germanic, English, and French folklore), a form of spirit, often described as metaphysical, supernatural, or preternatural.

Type of mythical being or legendary creature found in the folklore of multiple European cultures (including Celtic, Slavic, Germanic, English, and French folklore), a form of spirit, often described as metaphysical, supernatural, or preternatural.

A portrait of a fairy, by Sophie Gengembre Anderson (1869). The title of the painting is Take the Fair Face of Woman, and Gently Suspending, With Butterflies, Flowers, and Jewels Attending, Thus Your Fairy is Made of Most Beautiful Things (purportedly taken from a poem by Charles Ede).
A portrait of a fairy, by Sophie Gengembre Anderson (1869). The title of the painting is Take the Fair Face of Woman, and Gently Suspending, With Butterflies, Flowers, and Jewels Attending, Thus Your Fairy is Made of Most Beautiful Things (purportedly taken from a poem by Charles Ede).
1888 illustration by Luis Ricardo Falero of common modern depiction of a fairy with butterfly wings
Title page of a 1603 reprinting of Daemonologie
Illustration of a fairy by C. E. Brock
A resin statue of a fairy
Prince Arthur and the Faerie Queene by Johann Heinrich Füssli (c. 1788); scene from The Faerie Queene
The Quarrel of Oberon and Titania by Joseph Noel Paton (1849): fairies in Shakespeare
A fairy pictured in the coat of arms of Haljala Parish

Historical origins of fairies range from various traditions from Persian mythology to European folklore such as of Brythonic (Bretons, Welsh, Cornish), Gaelic (Irish, Scots, Manx), and Germanic peoples, and of Middle French medieval romances.

The Sergeant of Law

The Man of Law's Tale

3 links

Fifth of the Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer, written around 1387.

Fifth of the Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer, written around 1387.

The Sergeant of Law
ChaucerMS42131f16r
GowerexMS42131f46v

Her tale is also told in John Gower's Confessio Amantis, and both are similar to the verse Romance Emaré, and the cycle is generally known as the "Constance" cycle.

King Horn

1 links

King Horn is a Middle English chivalric romance dating back to the middle of the thirteenth century.

"Havelok presents Goldborough to the English people", a 1905 illustration by Henry Justice Ford

Havelok the Dane

1 links

"Havelok presents Goldborough to the English people", a 1905 illustration by Henry Justice Ford
Havelok's name as it appears in an early fourteenth-century manuscript.
1905 illustration showing the fisherman Grim and his wife, noticing Havelok glowing while he sleeps

Havelok the Dane, also known as Havelok or Lay of Havelok the Dane, is a thirteenth-century Middle English romance considered to be part of the Matter of England.

"Soria Moria" by Theodor Kittelsen: a hero glimpses the end of his quest.

Quest

2 links

Journey toward a specific mission or a goal.

Journey toward a specific mission or a goal.

"Soria Moria" by Theodor Kittelsen: a hero glimpses the end of his quest.
A Knight at the Crossroads by Viktor Vasnetsov
Vision of the Holy Grail (1890) by William Morris

Many medieval romances sent knights out on quests.

Huon of Bordeaux

1 links

Huon of Bordeaux is the title character of a 13th-century French epic poem with romance elements.

God Speed! by Edmund Blair Leighton, 1900: a late Victorian view of a lady giving a favor to a knight about to do battle

Courtly love

3 links

Medieval European literary conception of love that emphasized nobility and chivalry.

Medieval European literary conception of love that emphasized nobility and chivalry.

God Speed! by Edmund Blair Leighton, 1900: a late Victorian view of a lady giving a favor to a knight about to do battle
Court of Love in Provence in the 14th century (after a manuscript in the Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris)
Warfare imagery: the Siege of the Castle of Love on an ivory mirror-back, possibly Paris, ca. 1350–1370 (Musée du Louvre)
Lancelot and Guinevere in Howard Pyle's illustration for The Story of the Champions of the Round Table (1905)
Courtly vignettes on an ivory mirror-case, first third of the 14th century (Musée du Louvre)

The medieval genres in which courtly love conventions can be found include the lyric, the romance and the allegory.

Ariosto, detail of votive painting Madonna with Saints Joseph, John, Catherine, Louis of Toulouse and Lodovico Ariosto by Vincenzo Catena, 1512

Ludovico Ariosto

2 links

Italian poet.

Italian poet.

Ariosto, detail of votive painting Madonna with Saints Joseph, John, Catherine, Louis of Toulouse and Lodovico Ariosto by Vincenzo Catena, 1512
Entrance to the villa where Ariosto was born
Memorial statue and park, Ferrara
Portrait of Isabella d'Este, Leonardo da Vinci, 1499–1500
Titian, A Man with a Quilted Sleeve, long believed to be Ludovico Ariosto
Ariosto's play, first published in verse form in 1551
Statue of the poet in Reggio Emilia
Portrait of Ludovico Ariosto by Cristofano dell'Altissimo

He is best known as the author of the romance epic Orlando Furioso (1516).

Tristan and Isolde (Life) by Rogelio de Egusquiza (1912)

Tristan

3 links

Hero of the legend of Tristan and Iseult.

Hero of the legend of Tristan and Iseult.

Tristan and Isolde (Life) by Rogelio de Egusquiza (1912)
"Tristain's" attributed arms
Scenes from the story of Tristan on 13th-century tiles from Chertsey Abbey
270x270px
180x180px

In the 13th century, during the great period of prose romances, Tristan en prose or Prose Tristan became one of the most popular romances of its time.