Chivalric romance

Yvain fighting Gawain in order to regain the love of his lady Laudine. Medieval illumination from Chrétien de Troyes's romance, Yvain, le Chevalier au Lion
Holger Danske, or Ogier the Dane, from the Matter of France
A knight rescues a lady from a dragon.

Type of prose and verse narrative that was popular in the noble courts of High Medieval and Early Modern Europe.

- Chivalric romance
Yvain fighting Gawain in order to regain the love of his lady Laudine. Medieval illumination from Chrétien de Troyes's romance, Yvain, le Chevalier au Lion

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Portrait of Gottfried von Strassburg from the Codex Manesse (Folio 364r).

Gottfried von Strassburg

Author of the Middle High German courtly romance , an adaptation of the 12th-century Tristan and Iseult legend.

Author of the Middle High German courtly romance , an adaptation of the 12th-century Tristan and Iseult legend.

Portrait of Gottfried von Strassburg from the Codex Manesse (Folio 364r).
A page from the Munich MS of Gottfried's Tristan transcription

The text of Tristan is 19,548 lines long, and is written, like all courtly romances, in rhyming couplets.

Robert commits one of his crimes (left) and is knighted (right); 15th-century illustration from the Chronique de Normandie

Robert the Devil

Legend of medieval origin about a Norman knight who discovers he is the son of Satan.

Legend of medieval origin about a Norman knight who discovers he is the son of Satan.

Robert commits one of his crimes (left) and is knighted (right); 15th-century illustration from the Chronique de Normandie
Louis Guéymard in the Meyerbeer opera

Then it appears in a French metrical romance of the 13th century, in which Robert is described as the son of the duchess of Normandy.

Andrómeda by Juan Antonio de Frías y Escalante (1633–1670), depicting Princess Andromeda of Greek mythology chained to a rock as a sacrifice to the dragonlike sea monster Cetus

Princess and dragon

Andrómeda by Juan Antonio de Frías y Escalante (1633–1670), depicting Princess Andromeda of Greek mythology chained to a rock as a sacrifice to the dragonlike sea monster Cetus
Susanoo slaying the Yamata no Orochi, by Yoshitoshi
The Marshall (false hero) tells the court how he killed the dragon. Illustration by John Batten for Joseph Jacobs's Europa's Fairy Book (1916).
Ruggiero Rescuing Angelica, an illustration for Orlando Furioso by Gustave Doré
Russian civil war propaganda poster: White Russian knight is fighting the Red Russian dragon

Princess and dragon is a archetypical premise common to many legends, fairy tales, and chivalric romances.

Frontispiece to The Prisoner of Zenda by Anthony Hope.

Ruritanian romance

Genre of literature, film and theatre comprising novels, stories, plays and films set in a fictional country, usually in Central or Eastern Europe, such as the "Ruritania" that gave the genre its name.

Genre of literature, film and theatre comprising novels, stories, plays and films set in a fictional country, usually in Central or Eastern Europe, such as the "Ruritania" that gave the genre its name.

Frontispiece to The Prisoner of Zenda by Anthony Hope.

Such stories are typically swashbuckling adventure novels, tales of high romance and intrigue, centered on the ruling classes, almost always aristocracy and royalty, although (for instance) Winston Churchill's novel Savrola, in every other way a typical example of the genre, concerns a revolution to restore rightful parliamentary government in the republican country of Laurania.

Arms of FitzWarin: Quarterly per fess indented argent and gules

Fulk FitzWarin

Prominent representative of a marcher family associated especially with estates in Shropshire (on the English border with Wales) and at Alveston in Gloucestershire.

Prominent representative of a marcher family associated especially with estates in Shropshire (on the English border with Wales) and at Alveston in Gloucestershire.

Arms of FitzWarin: Quarterly per fess indented argent and gules
Whittington Castle gatehouse
Alberbury Castle, probably built for Fulk III
Seal-matrix of Fulk Fitz-Warin (1st half of 13th century), found near Lambourn.
Pembridge Castle (much restored), seat of Sir Henry de Pembridge

After his death Fulk became the subject of a popular "ancestral romance" in French verse, Fouke le Fitz Waryn, relating his life as an outlaw and his struggle to regain his patrimony from the king.

Wilhelm Wundt (seated) with colleagues in his psychological laboratory, the first of its kind.

Desire

Desires are states of mind that are expressed by terms like "wanting", "wishing", "longing" or "craving".

Desires are states of mind that are expressed by terms like "wanting", "wishing", "longing" or "craving".

Wilhelm Wundt (seated) with colleagues in his psychological laboratory, the first of its kind.

The theme of desire is at the core of romance novels, which often create drama by showing cases where human desire is impeded by social conventions, class, or cultural barriers.

A woodcut from William Caxton's second edition of The Canterbury Tales printed in 1483

The Tale of Gamelyn

A woodcut from William Caxton's second edition of The Canterbury Tales printed in 1483

The Tale of Gamelyn is a romance written in c. 1350 in a dialect of Middle English, considered part of the Matter of England.

Sir Degrevant

Sir Degrevant is a Middle English romance from the early fifteenth century.

'Ipomadon's favourite pursuit was hunting, and to see his greyhounds run. He would not listen to stories of chivalry and this troubled the 'Proud' very much.'

Ipomadon

The Anglo-Norman romance Ipomedon by Hue de Rotelande, composed near Hereford around 1180, survives in three separate Middle English versions, a long poem Ipomadon composed in tail-rhyme verse, possibly in the last decade of the fourteenth century, a shorter poem The Lyfe of Ipomydon, dating to the fifteenth century and a prose version, Ipomedon, also of the fifteenth century.

The Anglo-Norman romance Ipomedon by Hue de Rotelande, composed near Hereford around 1180, survives in three separate Middle English versions, a long poem Ipomadon composed in tail-rhyme verse, possibly in the last decade of the fourteenth century, a shorter poem The Lyfe of Ipomydon, dating to the fifteenth century and a prose version, Ipomedon, also of the fifteenth century.

'Ipomadon's favourite pursuit was hunting, and to see his greyhounds run. He would not listen to stories of chivalry and this troubled the 'Proud' very much.'
'Jason, greet your lady for me and tell her that you have spoken to me when I was a white knight, and now a red knight—for I cannot stay.'

The majority of the character's names in this medieval romance are taken from Ancient Greece, via the mid-twelfth century Old French Roman de Thèbes, and the action takes place in southern Italy; once Magna Graecia or Megálē Hellás, "Great Greece".

Yvain fighting Gawain in order to regain the love of his lady Laudine. Medieval illumination from Chrétien de Troyes's romance, Yvain, le Chevalier au Lion

Amadas

Yvain fighting Gawain in order to regain the love of his lady Laudine. Medieval illumination from Chrétien de Troyes's romance, Yvain, le Chevalier au Lion

Amadas, or Sir Amadace is a medieval English chivalric romance, one of the rare ones for which there is neither a known nor a conjectured French original, like Sir Eglamour of Artois.