Louisiana Indians Walking Along a Bayou Alfred Boisseau – 1847
The Willoughby Disk, a Mississippian ceremonial stone palette from Moundville Archaeological Park, housed onsite in the Jones Archaeological Museum. Photo by Jeffrey Reed.
The entire Choctaw Nation's location and size compared to the U.S. state of Mississippi
Watercolor painting of Choctaw men, painted for war and holding scalps, and children, by Alexandre de Batz, c. mid–18th century
Choctaw Village near the Chefuncte, by Francois Bernard, 1869. (Peabody Museum – Harvard University.) The women are preparing dye to color cane strips for making baskets.
Andrew Jackson, the 7th President of the United States and the city's namesake
The complete Choctaw Nation shaded in blue in relation to the U.S. state of Mississippi.
"Raising the Stars and Stripes Over the Capitol of the State of Mississippi", engraving from Harper's Weekly, June 20, 1863, after the capture of Jackson by Union forces during the American Civil War
Pushmataha, (c. 1764-1824)
September 1863 map of the Siege of Jackson
In 1830 Mosholatubbee sought to be elected to the Congress of the United States. 1834, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Mississippi Old Capitol, downtown Jackson
Kutteeotubbee was a noted warrior. 1834, Smithsonian American Art Museum
centre
Choctaw Eagle Dance, 1835–37, by George Catlin; Smithsonian American Art Museum
Map of Jackson in 1919
Choctaw chief Greenwood LeFlore's plantation home, Malmaison, was built in 1852 near Greenwood, Mississippi, and was described as a "palace in the wilderness."
April 16, 1921 flood on Town Creek, a tributary of the Pearl River in Jackson. The photo is a view of East Capitol Street looking east from North Farish Street.
Kindred Spirits sculpture in Midleton, County Cork, Ireland.
Standard Life Building, downtown Jackson
Jackson McCurtain, Lieutenant Colonel of the First Choctaw Battalion, CSA, late principal chief
Old Greyhound Bus Station
Choctaw girls in 1868. Smithsonian Institution.
Photograph of Jackson Mississippi taken from the International Space Station
Peter Pitchlynn was the Choctaw Principal Chief from 1864–1866, and a Choctaw Delegate to Washington, DC for nearly two decades following. He is buried in the Congressional Cemetery in Washington, D.C. Painting, 1834, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Map of racial distribution in Jackson, 2010 U.S. Census. Each dot is 25 people:
Faunceway Baptiste, a Choctaw man of mixed-race ancestry. 1868, Smithsonian Institution.
1874 engraving in Scribner's Monthly of the Old Capitol, the seat of Mississippi's legislature from 1839 to 1903.
Choctaw Nation senate in 1898. Oklahoma Historical Society.
Jackson State University band "The Sonic Boom"
From left to right, Chief Wesley Johnson, T. B. Sullivan, Culberson Davis, James E. Arnold, and Emil John.
Millsaps College is one of several institutions in and around Jackson established before 1900.
Louisiana Choctaws in front of their cabin in 1909
Mississippi State Capitol
Choctaws in training in World War I for coded radio & telephone transmissions
Thalia Mara Hall in Jackson, Mississippi
Wounded Choctaw soldier in World War I, U.S. National Red Cross Hospital No. 5, Auteuil, France
Lamar Life Building, downtown Jackson.
Group of Mississippi Choctaw males in the late 50s or early 60s. Photograph by Bob Ferguson.
Veterans Memorial Stadium is the largest stadium facility in Jackson. Its parking lot often is used by employees of the University of Mississippi Medical Center nearby.
Phillip Martin and family in the late 1950s or early 1960s
Norma Howard (Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma), award-winning watercolor painter, with Choctaw stickball sticks made by her son.
Image from video of Senate Indian Affairs Committee Hearing on 'Lobbying Practices Involving Indian Tribes' on September 29, 2004
Tullockchishko (Drinks the Juice of the Stones) was the greatest of Choctaw stickball players, 1834.
A Mississippian era engraved shell discovered at Eddyville, Kentucky
Modern geographic distribution of the Choctaw language.
Mississippi Choctaw group wearing traditional garb, c. 1908.

The region that is now the city of Jackson was historically part of the large territory occupied by the Choctaw Nation.

- Jackson, Mississippi

Martin died in Jackson, Mississippi, on February 4, 2010.

- Choctaw

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Vicksburg, Mississippi

Historic city in Warren County, Mississippi, United States.

Historic city in Warren County, Mississippi, United States.

Vicksburg City Hall, by architect James Riely Gordon
U.S. Post Office (former) and Courthouse in Vicksburg
Drawing of the hanging of five gamblers in Vicksburg in 1835
View of Vicksburg in 1855
Floating drydock in Vicksburg, circa 1905
Mississippi River Commission building, built 1884
Mississippi River at Vicksburg

It is located 234 mi northwest of New Orleans at the confluence of the Mississippi and Yazoo rivers, and 40 mi due west of Jackson, the state capital.

Aided by the Choctaw, traditional enemies of the Natchez, though, the French defeated and scattered the Natchez and their allies, the Yazoo.

Mississippi

State in the Southeastern region of the United States, bordered to the north by Tennessee; to the east by Alabama; to the south by the Gulf of Mexico; to the southwest by Louisiana; and to the northwest by Arkansas.

State in the Southeastern region of the United States, bordered to the north by Tennessee; to the east by Alabama; to the south by the Gulf of Mexico; to the southwest by Louisiana; and to the northwest by Arkansas.

Choctaw Village near the Chefuncte, by Francois Bernard, 1869, Peabody Museum—Harvard University. The women are preparing dye in order to color cane strips for making baskets.
Pushmataha, Choctaw Principal Chief
The Big House at D'Evereux Plantation. Built in 1840, the mansion is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Confederate lines, Vicksburg, May 19, 1863. Shows assault by US 1st Battalion, 13th Infantry
The legislature of the State of Mississippi in 1890
Child workers, Pass Christian, 1911, by Lewis Hine
Mexican American boy and African American man at the Knowlton Plantation, Perthshire, Mississippi, in 1939, by Marion Post Wolcott
Dancing at a juke joint near Clarksdale, Mississippi, in 1939, by Marion Post Wolcott
The previous flag of Mississippi, used until June 30, 2020, featured the Confederate battle flag
Bottomland hardwood swamp near Ashland
Map of the Mississippi Delta Region (outlined in green)
Map with all counties and their county seats
Köppen climate types of Mississippi, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
Hurricanes Camille (left) and Katrina from satellite imagery, as they approached the Mississippi Gulf Coast
Leaving Tennessee on US Highway 61
Clark Creek Natural Area, Wilkinson County
A racial/ethnic map of the state of Mississippi. The purple counties have black majorities, the blue ones have white majorities. The darker the color, the larger the majority.
Mississippi population density map
Liberty Baptist Church, Amite County
A Mississippi U.S. quarter
Sharecropper's daughter, Lauderdale County, 1935
2014 Corolla built by Toyota Motor Manufacturing Mississippi on display at the Tupelo Automobile Museum
Five Governors of Mississippi in 1976, from left: Ross Barnett, James P. Coleman, William L. Waller, John Bell Williams, and Paul B. Johnson Jr.
Treemap of the popular vote by county, 2016 presidential election
The Vicksburg Bridge carries I-20 and U.S. 80 across the Mississippi River at Vicksburg.
The Ross Barnett Reservoir at sunset
The Mississippi State Capitol was designated a National Historic Landmark in 2016.

Jackson is both the state's capital and largest city.

Descendant Native American tribes of the Mississippian culture in the Southeast include the Chickasaw and Choctaw.

Portrait by Ralph Eleaser Whiteside Earl, c. undefined 1835

Andrew Jackson

American lawyer, general, and statesman who served as the 7th president of the United States from 1829 to 1837.

American lawyer, general, and statesman who served as the 7th president of the United States from 1829 to 1837.

Portrait by Ralph Eleaser Whiteside Earl, c. undefined 1835
Young Jackson Refusing to Clean Major Coffin's Boots (1876 lithograph)
Notice of reward offered by Jackson for return of an enslaved man
General Andrew Jackson as pictured in Harper's Magazine, Vol 28, "War with the Creek Indians", page 605, 1864
In the Treaty of Fort Jackson, the Muscogee surrendered large parts of present-day Alabama and Georgia.
General Andrew Jackson by John Wesley Jarvis, c. undefined 1819
The Battle of New Orleans. General Andrew Jackson stands on the parapet of his defenses as his troops repulse attacking Highlanders, by painter Edward Percy Moran in 1910.
Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans, painted by Thomas Sully in 1845 from an earlier portrait he had completed from life in 1824
Trial of Robert Ambrister during the Seminole War. Ambrister was one of two British subjects executed by General Jackson. (1848)
Teracotta bust of General Jackson by William Rush, 1819
Jackson in 1824, painted by Thomas Sully
1828 election results
President Andrew Jackson
New York: Ritchie & Co. (1860)
Jackson's Indian Removal Act and subsequent treaties resulted in the forced removal of the major tribes of the Southeast from their traditional territories, many along the Trail of Tears.
Portrait of Jackson by Earl, 1830
William C. Rives, Jackson's Minister to France, successfully negotiated a reparations treaty with France in 1831.
1832 election results
1833 Democratic cartoon shows Jackson destroying the "Devil's Bank"
Richard Lawrence's attempt on Jackson's life, as depicted in an 1835 etching
USS Porpoise (1836), a brig ship laid down in 1835 and launched in May 1836; used in the U.S. Exploring Expedition
A New York newspaper blamed the Panic of 1837 on Andrew Jackson, depicted in spectacles and top hat.
Mezzotint after a Daguerreotype of Jackson by Mathew Brady, April 15, 1845
Tennessee Gentleman, portrait of Jackson, c. 1831, from the collection of The Hermitage
Andrew Jackson as Grand Master of Tennessee, 1822
Equestrian statue of Jackson, Jackson County Courthouse, Kansas City, Missouri, commissioned by Judge Harry S. Truman
Jackson portrait on obverse $20 bill
2-cent red stamp
2-cent green stamp
The tomb of Andrew and Rachel Jackson located at The Hermitage

The southern tribes included the Choctaw, Creek, Chickasaw, Seminole and the Cherokee.

Numerous counties and cities are named after him, including the cities of Jacksonville in Florida and North Carolina; the cities of Jackson in Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, and Tennessee; the city of Andrew in Iowa; Jackson County in Florida, Illinois, Iowa, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Ohio, and Oregon; and Jackson Parish in Louisiana.

Part of the original Natchez Trace near Natchez, Mississippi

Natchez Trace

Historic forest trail within the United States which extends roughly 440 mi from Nashville, Tennessee, to Natchez, Mississippi, linking the Cumberland, Tennessee, and Mississippi rivers.

Historic forest trail within the United States which extends roughly 440 mi from Nashville, Tennessee, to Natchez, Mississippi, linking the Cumberland, Tennessee, and Mississippi rivers.

Part of the original Natchez Trace near Natchez, Mississippi
Old Trace historical marker
The "Sunken Trace"
One of numerous overpasses on the Natchez Trace toward the exit to Vicksburg
A trail on the Natchez Trace
A cypress swamp along the side of the Natchez Trace near Jackson, Mississippi
Another view of the Sunken Trace (June 2015)
Buzzard Roost Stand
The spring located at Buzzard Roost Spring at Milepost 320.3 near Cherokee, Alabama.
Meriwether Lewis National Monument and Grave, April 2014

Early European explorers depended on the assistance of Native American guides to go through this territory — specifically, the Choctaw and Chickasaw who occupied the region.

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