Choir

choralchoruschoral musicchoristerchoirmasterchoirschurch choirmixed choirvocal ensemblechildren's choir
A choir (also known as a quire, chorale or chorus) is a musical ensemble of singers.wikipedia
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Musical ensemble

bandgroupensemble
A choir (also known as a quire, chorale or chorus) is a musical ensemble of singers.
Some music ensembles consist solely of singers, such as choirs and doo wop groups.

Medieval music

medievalMiddle Agesmusic
Choirs may perform music from the classical music repertoire, which spans from the medieval era to the present, or popular music repertoire.
Medieval music includes solely vocal music, such as Gregorian chant and choral music (music for a group of singers), solely instrumental music, and music that uses both voices and instruments (typically with the instruments accompanying the voices).

Conducting

conductorconductedconductors
Most choirs are led by a conductor, who leads the performances with arm and face gestures. Conducting is the art of directing a musical performance, such as a choral concert, by way of visible gestures with the hands, arms, face and head.
Conducting is the art of directing a musical performance, such as an orchestral or choral concert.

Mass (music)

massmassesMass setting
In typical 18th- to 21st-century oratorios and masses, chorus or choir is usually understood to imply more than one singer per part, in contrast to the quartet of soloists also featured in these works.
The mass (missa), a form of sacred musical composition, is a choral composition that sets the invariable portions of the Eucharistic liturgy (principally that of the Catholic Church, the Anglican Communion, and Lutheranism) to music.

Oratorio

oratoriosoratoriumoratoria
In typical 18th- to 21st-century oratorios and masses, chorus or choir is usually understood to imply more than one singer per part, in contrast to the quartet of soloists also featured in these works.
An oratorio is a large musical composition for orchestra, choir, and soloists.

Choir (architecture)

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The former term is very often applied to groups affiliated with a church (whether or not they actually occupy the choir) and the second to groups that perform in theatres or concert halls, but this distinction is far from rigid.
A choir, also sometimes called quire, is the area of a church or cathedral that provides seating for the clergy and church choir.

Venetian polychoral style

polychoralcori spezzatiVenetian
The term choir has the secondary definition of a subset of an ensemble; thus one speaks of the "woodwind choir" of an orchestra, or different "choirs" of voices or instruments in a polychoral composition.
The Venetian polychoral style was a type of music of the late Renaissance and early Baroque eras which involved spatially separate choirs singing in alternation.

American Choral Directors Association

Brock CommissionACDARaymond W. Brock memorial composition
Singing without accompaniment is called a cappella singing (although the American Choral Directors Association discourages this usage in favor of "unaccompanied", since a cappella denotes singing "as in the chapel" and much unaccompanied music today is secular).
The American Choral Directors Association (ACDA), headquartered in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, is a non-profit organization with the stated purpose of promoting excellence in the field of choral music.

Concert

concertsrecitallive music
Conducting is the art of directing a musical performance, such as a choral concert, by way of visible gestures with the hands, arms, face and head.
The performance may be by a single musician, sometimes then called a recital, or by a musical ensemble, such as an orchestra, choir, or band.

Music

audiomusicalPop
Conducting is the art of directing a musical performance, such as a choral concert, by way of visible gestures with the hands, arms, face and head.
In many cultures, music is an important part of people's way of life, as it plays a key role in religious rituals, rite of passage ceremonies (e.g., graduation and marriage), social activities (e.g., dancing) and cultural activities ranging from amateur karaoke singing to playing in an amateur funk band or singing in a community choir.

Anglican church music

church musicAnglican choral traditionAnglican tradition
Chief among these are the Anglican and Roman Catholic churches; far more common however is the performance of anthems or motets at designated times in the service.
It mostly consists of pieces written to be sung by a church choir, which may sing a cappella or accompanied by an organ.

Anthem

regional anthemanthemsanthemic
Chief among these are the Anglican and Roman Catholic churches; far more common however is the performance of anthems or motets at designated times in the service.
Originally, and in music theory and religious contexts, it also refers more particularly to short sacred choral work (still frequently seen in Sacred Harp and other types of shape note singing) and still more particularly to a specific form of Anglican church music.

Choirboy

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A choirboy is a boy member of a choir, also known as a treble.

Men's chorus

male voice choirmale choirMännerchor
A men's chorus or male voice choir (MVC) (German: Männerchor), is a choir consisting of men who sing with either a tenor or bass voice, and whose music is typically arranged into high and low tenors (1st and 2nd tenor), and high and low basses (1st and 2nd bass; or baritone and bass)—and shortened to the letters TTBB.

Organ (music)

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Accompanying instruments vary widely, from only one instrument (a piano or pipe organ) to a full orchestra of 70 to 100 musicians; for rehearsals a piano or organ accompaniment is often used, even if a different instrumentation is planned for performance, or if the choir is rehearsing unaccompanied music.
Due to its simultaneous ability to provide a musical foundation below the vocal register, support in the vocal register, and increased brightness above the vocal register, the organ is ideally suited to accompany human voices, whether a congregation, a choir, or a cantor or soloist.

Rehearsal

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However, in rehearsals, the conductor will often give verbal instructions to the ensemble, since they generally also serve as an artistic director who crafts the ensemble's interpretation of the music.
On the other end of the spectrum, a rehearsal can be held for a very large orchestra with over 100 performers and a choir.

Boys' choir

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A boys' choir is a choir primarily made up of choirboys who have yet to begin puberty or are in the early to middle stages of puberty and so retain their more highly pitched childhood voice type.

Soprano

operatic sopranosoprano vocalssoprano singer
The soprano's vocal range (using scientific pitch notation) is from approximately middle C (C 4 ) = 261 Hz to "high A" (A 5 ) = 880 Hz in choral music, or to "soprano C" (C 6, two octaves above middle C) = 1046 Hz or higher in operatic music.

Orchestra

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Accompanying instruments vary widely, from only one instrument (a piano or pipe organ) to a full orchestra of 70 to 100 musicians; for rehearsals a piano or organ accompaniment is often used, even if a different instrumentation is planned for performance, or if the choir is rehearsing unaccompanied music. Choirs may sing without instrumental accompaniment, with the accompaniment of a piano or pipe organ, with a small ensemble (e.g., harpsichord, cello and double bass for a Baroque piece), or with a full orchestra of 70 to 100 musicians.
The Ninth asks for a second pair of horns, for reasons similar to the "Eroica" (four horns has since become standard); Beethoven's use of piccolo, contrabassoon, trombones, and untuned percussion—plus chorus and vocal soloists—in his finale, are his earliest suggestion that the timbral boundaries of symphony might be expanded.

Chorale

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Lutheran composers wrote instrumentally accompanied cantatas, often based on chorale tunes.
In the 17th century the repertoire was enriched with more choral and organ settings of the chorale tunes.

War Requiem

Britten's War Requiemanti-war requiemBritten
Some composers actually specify that choirs should be separated, such as in Benjamin Britten's War Requiem.
The work is scored for soprano, tenor and baritone soloists, chorus, boys' choir, organ, and two orchestras (a full orchestra and a chamber orchestra).

SATB

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In music, SATB is an initialism for soprano, alto, tenor and bass, defining the voice types required by a chorus or choir to perform a particular musical work.

Folk music

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The origins of choral music are found in traditional music, as singing in big groups is extremely widely spread in traditional cultures (both singing in one part, or in unison, like in Ancient Greece, as well as singing in parts, or in harmony, like in contemporary European choral music).

Barbershop music

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Barbershop music is generally performed by either a barbershop quartet, a group of four singers with one on each vocal part, or a barbershop chorus, which closely resembles a choir with the notable exception of the genre of music.

Bach Choir (disambiguation)

Bach choir
Bach Choir may refer to one of many organizations featuring Bach's choral music, including: