A report on Choir and Motet

Evensong rehearsal in the quire of York Minster, showing carved choirstalls
The first page from the manuscript of J. S. Bach's Baroque music era motet, entitled Der Geist hilft unser Schwachheit auf (BWV226)
Egyptian Alexandria Jewish choir of Rabbin Moshe Cohen at Samuel Menashe synagogue, Alexandria, Egypt
The boychoir Cantores Minores in the Helsinki Cathedral in 2013
Lambrook School choir in the 1960s, a typical boys' school choir of the time
One possible layout
Choir in front of the orchestra
Relief, now in Athens, showing Dionysus with actresses (possibly from The Bacchae) carrying masks and drums
Church singing, Tacuinum Sanitatis Casanatensis (14th century)
Luca della Robbia's Cantoria, Museo dell'Opera del Duomo, Florence
Baroque cantata with one voice per part

Most often choirs consist of four sections intended to sing in four part harmony, but there is no limit to the number of possible parts as long as there is a singer available to sing the part: Thomas Tallis wrote a 40-part motet entitled Spem in alium, for eight choirs of five parts each; Krzysztof Penderecki's Stabat Mater is for three choirs of 16 voices each, a total of 48 parts.

- Choir

In the latter part of the 16th century, Giovanni Gabrieli and other composers developed a new style, the polychoral motet, in which two or more choirs of singers (or instruments) alternated.

- Motet
Evensong rehearsal in the quire of York Minster, showing carved choirstalls

3 related topics with Alpha

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Trobadours, 14th century

Medieval music

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Medieval music encompasses the sacred and secular music of Western Europe during the Middle Ages, from approximately the 6th to 15th centuries.

Medieval music encompasses the sacred and secular music of Western Europe during the Middle Ages, from approximately the 6th to 15th centuries.

Trobadours, 14th century
A musician plays the vielle in a fourteenth-century medieval manuscript
A sample of Kýrie Eléison XI (Orbis Factor) from the Liber Usualis. The modern "neumes" on the staff above the text indicate the pitches of the melody. [//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/cc/Kyrie_XI_%28Orbis_Factor%29_sample.ogg Listen] to it interpreted.
Pérotin, "Alleluia nativitas", in the third rhythmic mode.
Pérotin's Viderunt omnes, ca. 13th century.
Musicians playing the Spanish vihuela, one with a bow, the other plucked by hand, in the Cantigas de Santa Maria of Alfonso X of Castile, 13th century
Men playing the organistrum, from the Ourense Cathedral, Spain, 12th century
Christian and Muslim playing lutes in a miniature from Cantigas de Santa Maria of Alfonso X
In this illustration from the satirical collection of music and poetry Roman de Fauvel, the horse Fauvel is about to join Vainglory in the bridal bed and the people form a charivari in protest.
The chanson Belle, bonne, sage by Baude Cordier, an Ars subtilior piece included in the Chantilly Codex
Manuscript of the Mass Missa O Crux Lignum by Antoine Busnois (ca. 1450).

Medieval music includes liturgical music used for the church, and secular music, non-religious music; solely vocal music, such as Gregorian chant and choral music (music for a group of singers), solely instrumental music, and music that uses both voices and instruments (typically with the instruments accompanying the voices).

Of greater sophistication was the motet, which developed from the clausula genre of medieval plainchant.

Anthem

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Musical composition of celebration, usually used as a symbol for a distinct group, particularly the national anthems of countries.

Musical composition of celebration, usually used as a symbol for a distinct group, particularly the national anthems of countries.

Originally, and in music theory and religious contexts, it also refers more particularly to short sacred choral work (still frequently seen in Sacred Harp and other types of shape note singing) and still more particularly to a specific form of liturgical music.

In this sense, its use began ca. 1550 in English-speaking churches; it uses English language words, in contrast to the originally Roman Catholic 'motet' which sets a Latin text.

Mozart, c. 1781, detail from portrait by Johann Nepomuk della CroceWolfgang Amadeus Mozart Signature.svg

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

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Prolific and influential composer of the Classical period.

Prolific and influential composer of the Classical period.

Mozart, c. 1781, detail from portrait by Johann Nepomuk della CroceWolfgang Amadeus Mozart Signature.svg
Mozart's birthplace at Getreidegasse 9, Salzburg
The Mozart family on tour: Leopold, Wolfgang, and Nannerl. Watercolour by Carmontelle, c.1763
Mozart aged 14 in January 1770 (School of Verona, attributed to Giambettino Cignaroli)
, Salzburg, Mozart family residence from 1773; reconstructed 1996
Mozart wearing the badge of the Order of the Golden Spur which he received in 1770 from Pope Clement XIV in Rome. The painting is a 1777 copy of a work now lost.
Mozart family, c. 1780 (della Croce); the portrait on the wall is of Mozart's mother.
1782 portrait of Constanze Mozart by her brother-in-law Joseph Lange
Fortepiano played by Mozart in 1787, Czech Museum of Music, Prague
Drawing of Mozart in silverpoint, made by Dora Stock during Mozart's visit to Dresden, April 1789
Posthumous painting by Barbara Krafft in 1819
Detail of portrait of Mozart by his brother-in-law Joseph Lange; for discussion of the portrait, see Joseph Lange
Facsimile sheet of music from the Dies Irae movement of the Requiem Mass in D minor (K. 626) in Mozart's handwriting (Mozarthaus, Vienna)
Mozart Monument, Frankfurt, Mozartplatz, Frankfurt

Many of these compositions are acknowledged as pinnacles of the symphonic, concertante, chamber, operatic, and choral repertoire.

Toward the end of the journey, Mozart wrote the solo motet Exsultate, jubilate, K. 165.