A report on Choir

Evensong rehearsal in the quire of York Minster, showing carved choirstalls
Egyptian Alexandria Jewish choir of Rabbin Moshe Cohen at Samuel Menashe synagogue, Alexandria, Egypt
The boychoir Cantores Minores in the Helsinki Cathedral in 2013
Lambrook School choir in the 1960s, a typical boys' school choir of the time
One possible layout
Choir in front of the orchestra
Relief, now in Athens, showing Dionysus with actresses (possibly from The Bacchae) carrying masks and drums
Church singing, Tacuinum Sanitatis Casanatensis (14th century)
Luca della Robbia's Cantoria, Museo dell'Opera del Duomo, Florence
Baroque cantata with one voice per part

Musical ensemble of singers.

- Choir
Evensong rehearsal in the quire of York Minster, showing carved choirstalls

62 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Monteverdi by Bernardo Strozzi 
Claudio Monteverdi Signature.png

Claudio Monteverdi

2 links

Monteverdi by Bernardo Strozzi 
Claudio Monteverdi Signature.png
Cremona Cathedral, where Monteverdi's teacher Ingegneri was maestro di capella
The only certain portrait of Claudio Monteverdi, from the title page of Fiori poetici, a 1644 book of commemorative poems for his funeral
Duke Francesco IV Gonzaga, by the studio of Frans Pourbus the Younger
The basilica of San Marco, Venice
Letter from Monteverdi to Enzo Bentivoglio in Ferrara, 18 September 1627, (British Library, MS Mus. 1707), discussing the composer's intermezzo, Didone ed Enea
Monteverdi's tomb in the church of Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari
Musicians of the late Renaissance/early Baroque era (Gerard van Honthorst, The Concert, 1623)
Luca Marenzio, an early influence on Monteverdi
Frontispiece of Monteverdi's opera L'Orfeo, Venice edition, 1609.
Pages from the printed Magnificat of the Vespers, a page from the alto partbook (left), and the corresponding page from the continuo partbook (right)
Mantua at the time of its sacking in 1630
Poppea, represented in a 16th-century painting
The writer Gabriele D'Annunzio, an early 20th-century admirer of Monteverdi
From the 1979 production of L'incoronazione di Poppea in Spoleto

Claudio Giovanni Antonio Monteverdi (baptized 15 May 1567 – 29 November 1643) was an Italian composer, string player, choirmaster, and priest.

Organ (music)

1 links

Keyboard instrument of one or more pipe divisions or other means for producing tones, each played with its own keyboard, played either with the hands on a keyboard or with the feet using pedals.

Keyboard instrument of one or more pipe divisions or other means for producing tones, each played with its own keyboard, played either with the hands on a keyboard or with the feet using pedals.

Depiction of an organ in the Utrecht Psalter
Organ by Giovanni Guida
Theatre organ in State Cinema, Grays. (Compton Organ)
Chamber organ by Pascoal Caetano Oldovini (1762).
A harmonium. Operation of the two large pedals at the bottom of the case supplies wind to the reeds.
Hammond B3 organ,
with Leslie cabinet.
A Vox Continental combo organ
A modern digital organ (Nord Electro 2) utilizing modeling and DSP technology
Organ in St Giles' Cathedral
A modern digital Hammond organ in use
Nancy Faust playing at Guaranteed Rate Field, home of the Chicago White Sox

Due to its simultaneous ability to provide a musical foundation below the vocal register, support in the vocal register, and increased brightness above the vocal register, the organ is ideally suited to accompany human voices, whether a congregation, a choir, or a cantor or soloist.

Detail of an 18th-century posthumous engraving by Gerard Vandergucht, after Niccolò Haym
Tallis signature.png

Thomas Tallis

0 links

Thomas Tallis (c.

Thomas Tallis (c.

Detail of an 18th-century posthumous engraving by Gerard Vandergucht, after Niccolò Haym
Tallis signature.png
Around 1538, Tallis was appointed to serve at Waltham Abbey in Essex
Tallis's pupil William Byrd

1505 – 23 November 1585; also Tallys or Talles) was an English Renaissance composer who occupies a primary place in anthologies of English choral music.

The placement of the choir within a large Latin cross church

Choir (architecture)

0 links

The placement of the choir within a large Latin cross church
The choir of Bristol Cathedral, with the nave seen through the chancel screen, so looking west
The Quire in Palencia Cathedral in northern Spain, an example of a monastic quire
Illustration showing monk's stalls at Anellau, France, 14th century

A choir, also sometimes called quire, is the area of a church or cathedral that provides seating for the clergy and church choir.

A page (leaf 12 recto) from Beethoven's manuscript

Symphony No. 9 (Beethoven)

2 links

Choral symphony, the final complete symphony by Ludwig van Beethoven, composed between 1822 and 1824.

Choral symphony, the final complete symphony by Ludwig van Beethoven, composed between 1822 and 1824.

A page (leaf 12 recto) from Beethoven's manuscript
Theater am Kärntnertor in 1830
Portrait of Beethoven in 1824, the year his Ninth Symphony was premiered. He was almost completely deaf by the time of its composition.
Caroline Unger, who sang the contralto part at the first performance and is credited with turning Beethoven to face the applauding audience
Portrait of Friedrich Schiller by Ludovike Simanowiz (1794)
Handwritten page of the fourth movement
Ino Savini conducting the Ninth Symphony at the Rivoli Theatre in Porto, Portugal (1955)
Plaque at building Ungargasse No. 5, Vienna. "Ludwig van Beethoven completed in this house during the winter of 1823/24 his Ninth Symphony. In memory of the centenary of its first performance on 7 May 1824 the Wiener Schubertbund dedicated this memorial plaque to the master and his work on 7 May 1924."

The final (4th) movement of the symphony features four vocal soloists and a chorus.

Arvid Liljelund's Man Singing Hymn (1884)

Hymn

2 links

Type of song, usually religious and partially coincident with devotional song, specifically written for the purpose of adoration or prayer, and typically addressed to a deity or deities, or to a prominent figure or personification.

Type of song, usually religious and partially coincident with devotional song, specifically written for the purpose of adoration or prayer, and typically addressed to a deity or deities, or to a prominent figure or personification.

Arvid Liljelund's Man Singing Hymn (1884)
In Christianity, church congregations often sing hymns together as part of their worship (Pictured: worshippers at Uffington Parish Church in England, 1944)
Hymns are often accompanied by organ music
Sanskrit manuscript page from the "Vivaha sukta" Rigveda, dated 1500-1200 BCE

By the 1860s musical reformers like Lowell Mason (the so-called "better music boys") were actively campaigning for the introduction of more "refined" and modern singing styles, and eventually these American tune books were replaced in many churches, starting in the Northeast and urban areas, and spreading out into the countryside as people adopted the gentler, more soothing tones of Victorian hymnody, and even adopted dedicated, trained choirs to do their church's singing, rather than having the entire congregation participate.

Portrait of Joseph Haydn by Thomas Hardy (1791)

Joseph Haydn

2 links

Austrian composer of the Classical period.

Austrian composer of the Classical period.

Portrait of Joseph Haydn by Thomas Hardy (1791)
St. Stephen's Cathedral. In the foreground is the Kapellhaus (demolished 1804) where Haydn lived as a chorister.
Map showing locations where Haydn lived or visited
Morzin Palace, Dolní Lukavice, Czech Republic
Haydn's wife. Unauthenticated miniature attributed to Ludwig Guttenbrunn
Prince Nikolaus Esterházy, Haydn's most important patron
View of Eszterháza
Portrait by Ludwig Guttenbrunn, painted c. 1791–92, depicts Haydn c. 1770
Hanover Square Rooms, principal venue of Haydn's performances in London
Haydn as portrayed by John Hoppner in England in 1791
Wax sculpture of Haydn by Franz Thaler, c. 1800
House in Vienna (now a museum) where Haydn spent the last years of his life
Bergkirche in Eisenstadt, site of Haydn's tomb
Haydn's signature on a work of music: di me giuseppe Haydn ("by me Joseph Haydn"). He writes in Italian, a language he often used professionally.
Laus Deo ("praise be to God") at the conclusion of a Haydn manuscript.
Haydn on a 1950 20 Austrian schilling banknote
Original copy of "Gott erhalte Franz den Kaiser" in Haydn's hand
Joseph Haydn Playing Quartets

The people of Hainburg heard him sing treble parts in the church choir.

17th-century copy of a lost original portrait by an unknown artist.
Orlando Gibbons' Signature (vect).svg

Orlando Gibbons

2 links

English composer and keyboard player who was one of the last masters of the English Virginalist School and English Madrigal School.

English composer and keyboard player who was one of the last masters of the English Virginalist School and English Madrigal School.

17th-century copy of a lost original portrait by an unknown artist.
Orlando Gibbons' Signature (vect).svg
James Sargant Storer's drawing of, Orlando Gibbons's baptism place, St Martin's Church, Oxford, dated sometime before its renovations in 1820
16th-century Cambridge (Map by Braun and Hogenberg)
Employer of Orlando Gibbons, James I, who raised the annual salary of Gentleman of the Chapel Royal from £30 to £40 in 1604
Portrait of Charles, employer of Gibbons, as Prince of Wales after Daniel Mytens, c. 1623
Gibbons' memorial in Canterbury Cathedral designed by Nicholas Stone.

Orlando was born into a musical family: not only was his father a musician, but his oldest brother, Edward, was a composer and master of the Choir of King's College, Cambridge.

José Gallegos y Arnosa, El monaguillo (The Chorister

Choirboy

0 links

José Gallegos y Arnosa, El monaguillo (The Chorister

A choirboy is a boy member of a choir, also known as a treble.

The Choir of the French Army at the Lons-le-Saunier Theater.

Men's chorus

0 links

The Choir of the French Army at the Lons-le-Saunier Theater.

A men's chorus or male voice choir (MVC) (German: Männerchor), is a choir consisting of men who sing with either a tenor or bass voice, and whose music is typically arranged into high and low tenors (1st and 2nd tenor), and high and low basses (1st and 2nd bass; or baritone and bass)—and shortened to the letters TTBB.