Chord (music)

chordchordschordalchord symbolpiano chordchord-basedpiano chordssuspended fourthAkkordchord structure
A chord, in music, is any harmonic set of pitches consisting of multiple notes (also called "pitches") that are heard as if sounding simultaneously.wikipedia
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Arpeggio

arpeggiatedarpeggiosarpeggiation
For many practical and theoretical purposes, arpeggios and broken chords (in which the notes of the chord are sounded one after the other, rather than simultaneously), or sequences of chord tones, may also be considered as chords.
A broken chord is a chord broken into a sequence of notes.

Chord progression

progressionchord progressionschord changes
Chords and sequences of chords are frequently used in modern West African and Oceanic music, Western classical music, and Western popular music; yet, they are absent from the music of many other parts of the world.
In a musical composition, a chord progression or harmonic progression is a succession of chords.

Tonality

tonaltonal musictonalities
In tonal Western classical music (music with a tonic key or "home key"), the most frequently encountered chords are triads, so called because they consist of three distinct notes: the root note, and intervals of a third and a fifth above the root note.
Tonality is the arrangement of pitches and/or chords of a musical work in a hierarchy of perceived relations, stabilities, attractions and directionality.

Interval (music)

intervalintervalsmusical interval
In tonal Western classical music (music with a tonic key or "home key"), the most frequently encountered chords are triads, so called because they consist of three distinct notes: the root note, and intervals of a third and a fifth above the root note.
An interval may be described as horizontal, linear, or melodic if it refers to successively sounding tones, such as two adjacent pitches in a melody, and vertical or harmonic if it pertains to simultaneously sounding tones, such as in a chord.

Root (chord)

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In tonal Western classical music (music with a tonic key or "home key"), the most frequently encountered chords are triads, so called because they consist of three distinct notes: the root note, and intervals of a third and a fifth above the root note.
In music theory, the concept of root is the idea that a chord can be represented and named by one of its notes.

Tone cluster

tone clustersclusterscluster
Chords with more than three notes include added tone chords, extended chords and tone clusters, which are used in contemporary classical music, jazz and other genres.
A tone cluster is a musical chord comprising at least three adjacent tones in a scale.

Added tone chord

added toneaddedadded tones
Chords with more than three notes include added tone chords, extended chords and tone clusters, which are used in contemporary classical music, jazz and other genres.
An added tone chord, or added note chord, is a non-tertian chord composed of a tertian triad and an extra "added" note.

Factor (chord)

chord factorfactorchord tone
For many practical and theoretical purposes, arpeggios and broken chords (in which the notes of the chord are sounded one after the other, rather than simultaneously), or sequences of chord tones, may also be considered as chords.
In music, a factor or chord factor is a member or component of a chord.

Extended chord

extensionsextended chordschord extensions
Chords with more than three notes include added tone chords, extended chords and tone clusters, which are used in contemporary classical music, jazz and other genres.
In music, extended chords are tertian chords (built from thirds) or triads with notes extended, or added, beyond the seventh.

Third (chord)

thirdtenthmajor tenth
In tonal Western classical music (music with a tonic key or "home key"), the most frequently encountered chords are triads, so called because they consist of three distinct notes: the root note, and intervals of a third and a fifth above the root note.
In music, the third factor of a chord is the note or pitch two scale degrees above the root or tonal center.

Roman numeral analysis

Roman numeralsRoman numeralRoman numeral chord analysis
To describe this, Western music theory has developed the practice of numbering chords using Roman numerals to represent the number of diatonic steps up from the tonic note of the scale. Common ways of notating or representing chords in Western music (other than conventional staff notation) include Roman numerals, the Nashville Number System, figured bass, macro symbols (sometimes used in modern musicology), and chord charts.
Roman numeral analysis is a type of musical analysis in which chords are represented by Roman numerals (I, II, III, IV, …).

Music

audiomusicalPop
A chord, in music, is any harmonic set of pitches consisting of multiple notes (also called "pitches") that are heard as if sounding simultaneously.
We also talk about pitch in the precise sense associated with musical melodies, basslines and chords.

Fifth (chord)

fifth5thfifths
In tonal Western classical music (music with a tonic key or "home key"), the most frequently encountered chords are triads, so called because they consist of three distinct notes: the root note, and intervals of a third and a fifth above the root note.
In music, the fifth factor of a chord is the note or pitch that is the fifth scale degree, counting the root or tonal center.

Key (music)

keykeysminor key
Although any chord may in principle be followed by any other chord, certain patterns of chords are more common in Western music, and some patterns have been accepted as establishing the key (tonic note) in common-practice harmony—notably the resolution of a dominant chord to a tonic chord.
The group features a tonic note and its corresponding chords, also called a tonic or tonic chord, which provides a subjective sense of arrival and rest, and also has a unique relationship to the other pitches of the same group, their corresponding chords, and pitches and chords outside the group.

Twelve-bar blues

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One example of a widely used chord progression in Western traditional music and blues is the 12 bar blues progression.
The blues progression has a distinctive form in lyrics, phrase, chord structure, and duration.

Figured bass

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Common ways of notating or representing chords in Western music (other than conventional staff notation) include Roman numerals, the Nashville Number System, figured bass, macro symbols (sometimes used in modern musicology), and chord charts. It was in the Baroque period that the accompaniment of melodies with chords was developed, as in figured bass, and the familiar cadences (perfect authentic, etc.).
Figured bass, or thoroughbass, is a kind of musical notation in which numerals and symbols (often accidentals) indicate intervals, chords, and non-chord tones that a musician playing piano, harpsichord, organ, lute (or other instruments capable of playing chords) play in relation to the bass note that these numbers and symbols appear above or below.

Diatonic and chromatic

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To describe this, Western music theory has developed the practice of numbering chords using Roman numerals to represent the number of diatonic steps up from the tonic note of the scale.
Diatonic and chromatic are terms in music theory that are most often used to characterize scales, and are also applied to musical instruments, intervals, chords, notes, musical styles, and kinds of harmony.

Blues

blues musicthe bluespiano blues
One example of a widely used chord progression in Western traditional music and blues is the 12 bar blues progression.
The blues chords associated to a twelve-bar blues are typically a set of three different chords played over a 12-bar scheme.

Nashville Number System

Nashville Numbers
Common ways of notating or representing chords in Western music (other than conventional staff notation) include Roman numerals, the Nashville Number System, figured bass, macro symbols (sometimes used in modern musicology), and chord charts.
The Nashville Number System is a method of transcribing music by denoting the scale degree on which a chord is built.

Macro analysis

macro symbolsMACROchord symbol
Common ways of notating or representing chords in Western music (other than conventional staff notation) include Roman numerals, the Nashville Number System, figured bass, macro symbols (sometimes used in modern musicology), and chord charts.
In music theory, macro analysis is a method of transcribing, or writing down chords that may be used along with or instead of conventional Roman numeral analysis used in musical analysis.

Resolution (music)

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Although any chord may in principle be followed by any other chord, certain patterns of chords are more common in Western music, and some patterns have been accepted as establishing the key (tonic note) in common-practice harmony—notably the resolution of a dominant chord to a tonic chord.
Resolution in western tonal music theory is the move of a note or chord from dissonance (an unstable sound) to a consonance (a more final or stable sounding one).

Common chord (music)

pivot chordcommon chordcommon chords
Furthermore, as three notes are needed to define any common chord, three is often taken as the minimum number of notes that form a definite chord.
A common chord, in the theory of harmony, is a chord that is diatonic to more than one key or, in other words, is common to (shared by) two keys.

Cadence

cadencesplagal cadenceperfect cadence
It was in the Baroque period that the accompaniment of melodies with chords was developed, as in figured bass, and the familiar cadences (perfect authentic, etc.).
A harmonic cadence is a progression of (at least) two chords that concludes a phrase, section, or piece of music.

Accompaniment

accompanistaccompaniedaccompanying
It was in the Baroque period that the accompaniment of melodies with chords was developed, as in figured bass, and the familiar cadences (perfect authentic, etc.).
In homophonic music, the main accompaniment approach used in popular music, a clear vocal melody is supported by subordinate chords.

Chromaticism

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The Romantic period, the 19th century, featured increased chromaticism.
Chromaticism is a compositional technique interspersing the primary diatonic pitches and chords with other pitches of the chromatic scale.