Chorizo

chouriçoGoan chouriçochorizoslonganizaChorisachorizadaChorizo de PamplonaChorizo/ChouriçoChorizo/Chouriço/Chourizuchorizu
Chorizo (, from Spanish ) or chouriço (from Portuguese ) is a type of pork sausage.wikipedia
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Portuguese cuisine

PortuguesePortugalPortuguese dishes
Spanish chorizo and Portuguese chouriço get their distinctive smokiness and deep red color from dried, smoked, red peppers (pimentón/pimentão). Many dishes of Portuguese cuisine and Brazilian cuisine make use of chouriço – cozido à portuguesa and feijoada are just two of them.
Chunks of chouriço (a spicy Portuguese sausage) are often added as well, but may be omitted, thereby making the soup fully vegan.

Spanish cuisine

SpanishSpainSpanish food
Spanish chorizo and Portuguese chouriço get their distinctive smokiness and deep red color from dried, smoked, red peppers (pimentón/pimentão).
Fabada is the traditional stew of the region, made with white beans, sausages such as chorizo, morcilla, and pork.

Pork

pig meatpigporc
Chorizo (, from Spanish ) or chouriço (from Portuguese ) is a type of pork sausage.
Many traditional European sausages are made with pork, including chorizo, fuet, Cumberland sausage and salami.

Sausage

sausagespork sausagekiełbasa
Chorizo (, from Spanish ) or chouriço (from Portuguese ) is a type of pork sausage.
In the Philippines, sausages are generally called longaniza (Filipino: longganisa) in the northern regions and chorizo (Visayan: choriso, tsoriso or soriso) in the southern regions.

Grilling

grilledgrillbroiled
Chorizo is eaten sliced in a sandwich, grilled, fried, or simmered in liquid, including apple cider or other strong alcoholic beverages such as aguardiente.
Popular cuts include arrachera, beefsteak and rib eye, as well as chorizo and chicken, among others.

Feijoada

Mistura de Sabores e Raças: Uma Feijoada á Brasileira
Many dishes of Portuguese cuisine and Brazilian cuisine make use of chouriço – cozido à portuguesa and feijoada are just two of them.
It is usually served with rice and assorted sausages such as chouriço, morcela (blood sausage), farinheira, and others, which may or may not be cooked in the stew.

Longaniza

longganisaLonganisachorizo
Chorizo and longaniza are not considered the same thing in Mexico, since in Mexico, longaniza are typically longer and spicier than chorizo.
Longaniza (, or ) is a Spanish sausage (embutido) similar to a chorizo and also closely associated with the Portuguese linguiça.

Fabada asturiana

fabadaAsturian bean stew
Depending on the variety, chorizo can be eaten sliced without further cooking, sometimes sliced in a sandwich, or grilled, fried, or baked alongside other foodstuffs, and is also an ingredient in several dishes where it accompanies beans, such as fabada or cocido montañés.
Fabada is made with dried large white beans (fabes de la Granja, soaked overnight before use), shoulder of pork (lacón) or bacon (tocino), black pudding (morcilla), chorizo, and often saffron (azafrán).

Cocido montañés

montañés
Depending on the variety, chorizo can be eaten sliced without further cooking, sometimes sliced in a sandwich, or grilled, fried, or baked alongside other foodstuffs, and is also an ingredient in several dishes where it accompanies beans, such as fabada or cocido montañés.
The rest of the elements of this recipe are known as compangu which refers to the meat ingredients from the pig slaughter: bacon (tocino), pork ribs (costilla), black pudding (morcilla) and sausage (chorizo).

Fermentation in food processing

fermentationfermentedferment
In Europe, chorizo is a fermented, cured, smoked sausage, which may be sliced and eaten without cooking, or added as an ingredient to add flavor to other dishes.
Chorizo, salami, sucuk, pepperoni, nem chua, som moo, saucisson

Queso flameado

queso fundidoQuesocheese dish of the same name
In Mexico, restaurants and food stands make tacos, queso fundido (or choriqueso), burritos, and tortas with cooked chorizo, and it is also a popular pizza topping.
Queso flameado (Spanish for "flamed cheese"; also queso fundido, "melted cheese" or choriqueso) is a dish of hot melted cheese and spicy chorizo that is often served flambé.

La Rioja (Spain)

La RiojaRiojaLogroño
Among the varieties is chorizo Riojano from the La Rioja region, which has PGI protection within the EU.
Types of industry include wine production and conserves (in Logroño, Cenicero, Haro and Calahorra); textiles and footwear (in Logroño, Arnedo, Cervera del Río Alhama and Ezcaray); furniture manufacturing (in Ezcaray, Logroño and Nájera); rubber, plastics, chemical products and transport machinery; and chorizo, made in Casalarreina.

Toluca

Toluca, MexicoToluca, State of MexicoToluca de Lerdo
The area of around Toluca, known as the capital of chorizo outside of the Iberian Peninsula, specializes in "green" chorizo, made with some combination of tomatillo, cilantro, chili peppers, and garlic.
In colonial times, Toluca first gained economic importance as a producer of smoked and cured meats, especially chorizo sausage.

Cozido à portuguesa

à portuguesa
Many dishes of Portuguese cuisine and Brazilian cuisine make use of chouriço – cozido à portuguesa and feijoada are just two of them.
Cozido à portuguesa is prepared with a multitude of vegetables (beans, potatoes, carrots, turnips, cabbages, rice), meat (chicken, pork ribs, bacon, pork ear and trotters, various parts of beef), and smoked sausages (chouriço, farinheira, morcela, and blood sausage), among others.

Farinheira

In Portugal, a blood chouriço (chouriço de sangue) similar to black pudding is made, amongst many other types of enchidos, such as alheira, linguiça, morcela, farinheira, chouriço de vinho, chouriço de ossos, chourição, cacholeira, paia, paio, paiola, paiote, and tripa enfarinhada.
Although it resembles a chouriço or other meat sausage, its taste is not meaty; it is tangy (but not hot), with a doughy texture and has a somewhat sweet finish in the palate.

Offal

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Quality chorizo consists of good cuts of pork stuffed in natural casings, while some of the cheapest commercial styles use variety meats stuffed in inedible plastic casing to resemble sausage links.
Some of the strongest are as hard in texture as chorizo or salami, while others are soft, and some types incorporate rice, giving the stuffing a haggis-like appearance.

Choripán

choripan
In Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay, Uruguay, Chile, and Peru, fresh chorizo, cooked and served in a bread roll, is called a choripán.
Choripán (plural: choripanes) is a type of sandwich with chorizo, popular in Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay.

Rhode Island

RIState of Rhode IslandR.I.
In the heavily Portuguese counties in Rhode Island and southeastern Massachusetts, chouriço is often served with little neck clams and white beans.
Linguiça or chouriço is a spicy Portuguese sausage, frequently served with peppers among the state's large Portuguese community and eaten with hearty bread.

Morcón

Morcon
Morcón is a type of chorizo, eaten in much the same way.

Botillo

BoteloChouriço de ossosBotillo/Botelo
In Portugal, a blood chouriço (chouriço de sangue) similar to black pudding is made, amongst many other types of enchidos, such as alheira, linguiça, morcela, farinheira, chouriço de vinho, chouriço de ossos, chourição, cacholeira, paia, paio, paiola, paiote, and tripa enfarinhada.
Flavored with Chorizo/Chouriço/Chourizu, the pig's ear and snout together with very tender cabbage makes a tasty and substantial stew.

Linguiça

linguicaPortuguese sausagecalabresa sausage
In Portugal, a blood chouriço (chouriço de sangue) similar to black pudding is made, amongst many other types of enchidos, such as alheira, linguiça, morcela, farinheira, chouriço de vinho, chouriço de ossos, chourição, cacholeira, paia, paio, paiola, paiote, and tripa enfarinhada.
Mangalorean linguiça is spicier than Portuguese linguiça, and is more closely related to Goan chouriço.

Filipino cuisine

FilipinoPhilippine cuisinePhilippines
Longaniza (longganisa; Visayan: chorizo, choriso, soriso) are Philippine chorizos flavored with indigenous spices, and may be made of chicken, beef, or even tuna.
Philippine longganisa despite its name is more akin to chorizo than Spanish longaniza (in Visayan regions, it is still known as chorizo).

Alheira

In Portugal, a blood chouriço (chouriço de sangue) similar to black pudding is made, amongst many other types of enchidos, such as alheira, linguiça, morcela, farinheira, chouriço de vinho, chouriço de ossos, chourição, cacholeira, paia, paio, paiola, paiote, and tripa enfarinhada.

Goan Catholics

Goan CatholicGoanCatholics
In Goa, India, which was ruled by the Portuguese for 450 years and has a large percentage of Goan Catholics, chouriço is made from pork marinaded in a mixture of vinegar, red chilies, and spices such as garlic, ginger, cumin, turmeric, cloves, pepper, and cinnamon, which is stuffed into casings.
Other popular meat preparations include Xacuti, Chorisa (spicy pork sausages), Vindaloo, Pork Indad, and Assado de Leitoã (roasted pork).