Chorleywood bread process

Chorleywood
The Chorleywood bread process (CBP) is a process of making dough in bread production.wikipedia
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Bread

breadsbreadmakingleavened bread
The Chorleywood bread process (CBP) is a process of making dough in bread production.
The Chorleywood bread process was developed in 1961; it uses the intense mechanical working of dough to dramatically reduce the fermentation period and the time taken to produce a loaf.

Chorleywood

Chorley WoodChorleywood Golf ClubChorleywood UD
The process was developed in 1961 by the British Baking Industries Research Association based at Chorleywood in Hertfordshire, and in 2009 was used to make 80% of the United Kingdom's bread.
This resulted in the Chorleywood Bread Process which is now used in over 80% of commercial bread production throughout the UK.

Flour treatment agent

bread improverimproving agentmaturing agent
*Flour treatment agent
*Chorleywood bread process

Manufacturing

manufacturermanufacturemanufacturers
The Chorleywood bread process (CBP) is a process of making dough in bread production.

Hertfordshire

HertsCounty of HertfordHertford
The process was developed in 1961 by the British Baking Industries Research Association based at Chorleywood in Hertfordshire, and in 2009 was used to make 80% of the United Kingdom's bread.

Protein (nutrient)

proteincrude proteinproteins
Compared to the older bulk fermentation process, the CBP is able to use lower-protein wheat, and produces bread in a shorter time.

Wheat flour

cake flourwheatflour
CBP is able to use lower-protein wheat because some protein is lost during bulk fermentation of traditional bread; this does not occur to the same degree in mechanically developed doughs.

Grist

grist for the mill
The process had an important impact in the United Kingdom where, at the time, few domestic wheat varieties were of sufficient quality to make high quality bread products; the process therefore permitted a much greater proportion of lower-protein domestic wheat to be used in the grist.

Wheat

cornTriticumdwarf wheat
Compared to the older bulk fermentation process, the CBP is able to use lower-protein wheat, and produces bread in a shorter time.

Vitamin C

ascorbic acidascorbateC
This is achieved through the addition of Vitamin C, fat, yeast, and intense mechanical working by high-speed mixers.

Fat

greasetotal fatdietary fat
This is achieved through the addition of Vitamin C, fat, yeast, and intense mechanical working by high-speed mixers.

Yeast

yeastsbrewer's yeastbudding yeast
This is achieved through the addition of Vitamin C, fat, yeast, and intense mechanical working by high-speed mixers.

Emulsion

emulsifieremulsifiersemulsification
Flour, water, yeast, salt, fat, and, where used, minor ingredients common to many bread-making techniques such as Vitamin C, emulsifiers and enzymes are mechanically mixed for about three minutes.

Enzyme

enzymologyenzymesenzymatic
Flour, water, yeast, salt, fat, and, where used, minor ingredients common to many bread-making techniques such as Vitamin C, emulsifiers and enzymes are mechanically mixed for about three minutes.

Proofing (baking technique)

proofingproofedcouche
Each piece of dough is then shaped (moulded), placed in a baking tin and moved to the humidity- and temperature-controlled proofing chamber, where it sits for about 45–50 minutes.

Organic food

organicorganic foodsorganic produce
Many "speciality", "crusty", and organic breads are produced this way.

Vienna bread

Vienna ProcessHungarian high-milled flourVienna loaf
* Vienna bread, early innovative European bread process

East of England

Easteastern EnglandEastern
The Chorleywood bread process from 1961 changed bread production all over world.

Aerated Bread Company

ABCA.B.C.A.B.C. tea shops
The Dauglish method survived its creator, and Dauglish's company survived him by well over a century, but his method was later superseded by the adoption of mechanical, high-speed dough processes such as the Chorleywood Bread Process (CBP), now responsible for 80 percent of U.K. bread production.

Culture of England

Englishquintessentially EnglishEnglish culture
Since the 1960s much commercially produced bread has used the Chorleywood bread process, but from the 1990s there has been growing interest in artisanal and home baking as well as sourdough bread.

Bread in culture

Bread has a significance beyond mere nutrition in many cultures
There are many variations on bread rolls, such as baps, barms, breadcakes and so on. The Chorleywood process for mass-producing bread was developed in England in the 1960s before spreading worldwide.

Joseph H. Hulse

Later, during his researches at the Royal College of Science and Technology, he is known to have contributed in the development of Chorleywood Bread Process, a project the British Baking Industries Research Association (BBIRA) completed in 1961.

Isoflavone

isoflavones
In countries using the chorleywood bread process, such as in the UK, bread is a source of isoflavones from soy.

History of bread

breaddifferent historyfirst breads
A major change was the development in 1961 of the Chorleywood Bread Process.