Christian theosophy

TheosophytheosophisttheosophicaltheosopherTheosophistsTheosophy (history of philosophy)Boehmian TheosophyTheosophy (Boehmian) "theosophyChristian Theosophical
Christian theosophy, also known as Boehmian theosophy and theosophy, refers to a range of positions within Christianity which focus on the attainment of direct, unmediated knowledge of the nature of divinity and the origin and purpose of the universe.wikipedia
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Western esotericism

esotericesotericismesotericist
Theosophy is considered part of Western esotericism, which believes that hidden knowledge or wisdom from the ancient past offers a path to enlightenment and salvation.
Renaissance Europe saw increasing interest in many of these older ideas, with various intellectuals combining "pagan" philosophies with the Kabbalah and Christian philosophy, resulting in the emergence of esoteric movements like Christian theosophy.

Jakob Böhme

BehmenistBehmenismBehmenists
The foundation of Christian theosophy is usually attributed to the German philosopher Jakob Böhme.
He has in turn greatly influenced many anti-authoritarian and mystical movements, such as Radical Pietism (including the Ephrata Cloister and Society of the Woman in the Wilderness), the Religious Society of Friends, the Philadelphians, the Gichtelians, the Harmony Society, the Zoarite Separatists, Rosicrucianism, Martinism and Christian theosophy.

The New Church (Swedenborgian)

SwedenborgianSwedenborgianismThe New Church
This society was renamed in 1785 as "The British Society for the Propagation of the Doctrines of the New Church", consisting of Swedenborgian based beliefs.
Occultism became increasingly popular during the 19th century (particularly in France and England), and some followers blended Swedenborg's writings with theosophy, alchemy, and divination.

Martinism

MartinistMartinist OrderMartinists
Groups such as the Martinist Order founded by Papus in 1891, followed the theosophical current closely linked to the Judeo-Christian-Islamic tradition and Western esotericism.
In a nutshell, the Martinism as we know it today consists of the theurgic tradition of Martinez de Pasqually (Martinezism), the Masonic Templarism of Jean-Baptiste Willermoz (Willermozism) and the Christian Theosophy of Louis-Claude de Saint-Martin.

John Pordage

Rev Dr John Pordage
This group is represented by Jan Baptist van Helmont (1618–1699), Robert Fludd (1574–1637), John Pordage (1608–1681), Jane Leade (1623–1704), Henry More (1614–1687), Pierre Poiret (1646–1719), and Antoinette Bourignon (1616–1680).
He was not, however, a man of robust intellect; his insight into Böhme's writings was feeble, and his theosophy was of the emotional order.

Christian Kabbalah

CabbalaChristian KabbalistChristian Cabala
Faivre describes the "theosophic current" or theosophy as a single esoteric current among seven other esoteric currents in early modern Western thought (i.e., alchemy, astrology, Neo-Alexandrian Hermeticism, Christian Kabbalah, Paracelsism—that is, the studying of the "prognostications" of Paracelsus—philosophia occulta and Rosicrucianism).
His significance for the history of Christian Kabbalah is that his ideas and doctrines exercised a profound influence on the works of the German theosopher, Jakob Böhme, in particular Böhme's Forty Questions on the Soul (c.1621).

Christianity

ChristianChristiansChristian faith
Christian theosophy, also known as Boehmian theosophy and theosophy, refers to a range of positions within Christianity which focus on the attainment of direct, unmediated knowledge of the nature of divinity and the origin and purpose of the universe.

Divinity

divinegodhooddivinities
Christian theosophy, also known as Boehmian theosophy and theosophy, refers to a range of positions within Christianity which focus on the attainment of direct, unmediated knowledge of the nature of divinity and the origin and purpose of the universe.

Mysticism

mysticmysticalmystics
They have been characterized as mystical philosophies.

Enlightenment (spiritual)

enlightenmentspiritual enlightenmentspiritual awakening
Theosophy is considered part of Western esotericism, which believes that hidden knowledge or wisdom from the ancient past offers a path to enlightenment and salvation.

Kabbalah

KabbalistickabbalistKabbalists
Jewish Kabbalah was also formative for Christian theosophy from Boehme on.

Theosophical Society

TheosophicalThe Theosophical SocietyTheosophy
In 1875, the term "theosophy" was adopted and revived by the Theosophical Society, an esoteric organisation which spawned a spiritual movement also called Theosophy.

Theosophy

theosophisttheosophicalTheosophists
In 1875, the term "theosophy" was adopted and revived by the Theosophical Society, an esoteric organisation which spawned a spiritual movement also called Theosophy.

Church Fathers

Church FatherFathers of the Churchpatristic
The term theosophia appeared (in both Greek and Latin) in the works of early church fathers, as a synonym for theology: the theosophoi are "those knowing divine things".

Theology

theologiantheologicaltheologians
The term theosophia appeared (in both Greek and Latin) in the works of early church fathers, as a synonym for theology: the theosophoi are "those knowing divine things".

Iamblichus

Iamblichus of ChalcisIamblichus ChalcidensisIamblichus (philosopher)
The adjective "theosophos" "wise in divine things" was applied by Iamblichus to the gymnosophists, i.e. the Indian yogis or sadhus.

Gymnosophists

gymnosophistGymnosophists''' (nickname)
The adjective "theosophos" "wise in divine things" was applied by Iamblichus to the gymnosophists, i.e. the Indian yogis or sadhus.

Yogi

yogisyogingreat yogi
The adjective "theosophos" "wise in divine things" was applied by Iamblichus to the gymnosophists, i.e. the Indian yogis or sadhus.

Sadhu

sadhussadhvisādhu
The adjective "theosophos" "wise in divine things" was applied by Iamblichus to the gymnosophists, i.e. the Indian yogis or sadhus.

Joscelyn Godwin

Godwin, JoscelynGodwin
Scholars of esotericism such as Godwin and Faivre differentiated the tradition of religious illumination from the religious system established in the late nineteenth century by Helena Blavatsky by referring to the latter with a capital letter as Theosophy, and the former with a lower-case letter as theosophy.

Antoine Faivre

Faivre
Scholars of esotericism such as Godwin and Faivre differentiated the tradition of religious illumination from the religious system established in the late nineteenth century by Helena Blavatsky by referring to the latter with a capital letter as Theosophy, and the former with a lower-case letter as theosophy.

Helena Blavatsky

Madame BlavatskyHelena Petrovna BlavatskyBlavatsky
Scholars of esotericism such as Godwin and Faivre differentiated the tradition of religious illumination from the religious system established in the late nineteenth century by Helena Blavatsky by referring to the latter with a capital letter as Theosophy, and the former with a lower-case letter as theosophy.

Robert Grosseteste

GrossetesteGrosseteste, RobertBishop Grosseteste
The 13th-century work Summa philosophiae attributed to Robert Grosseteste made a distinction between theosophers and theologians.

Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite

Pseudo-DionysiusDionysius the AreopagiteDionysius the Pseudo-Areopagite
In Summa, theosophers were described as authors only inspired by the holy books, while theologians like Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite and Origen were described as persons whose task was to explain theosophy.

Origen

Origen of AlexandriaOrigenismOrigenist
In Summa, theosophers were described as authors only inspired by the holy books, while theologians like Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite and Origen were described as persons whose task was to explain theosophy.