Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard

Christiane Nusslein-VolhardChristiane VolhardC. Nüsslein-VolhardChristiane Nüsslein VolhardNüsslein-Volhard
Christiane (Janni) Nüsslein-Volhard (born 20 October 1942) is a German developmental biologist and 1995 Nobel Prize-winner.wikipedia
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University of Tübingen

TübingenTübingen UniversityEberhard Karls University of Tübingen
Nüsslein-Volhard earned her PhD in 1974 from the University of Tübingen, where she studied protein-DNA interaction.
Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard, the first female Nobel Prize winner in medicine in Germany, also works at Tübingen.

Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research

Lasker AwardAlbert Lasker Medical Research AwardAlbert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award
She won the Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research in 1991 and the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1995, together with Eric Wieschaus and Edward B. Lewis, for their research on the genetic control of embryonic development.

Genetic screen

positional cloningscreensscreen
Nüsslein-Volhard and Wieschaus identified genes involved in embryonic development by a series of genetic screens.
Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard and Eric Wieschaus were the first individuals to perform this type of screening procedure.

Hedgehog signaling pathway

HedgehogHedgehog proteinHedgehog signaling
Many of these genes were given descriptive names based on the appearance of the mutant larvae, such as hedgehog, gurken (German: "cucumbers"), and Krüppel ( "cripple").
In the late 1970s Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard and Eric Wieschaus isolated mutations in genes that control development of the segmented anterior-posterior body axis of the fly; their "saturation mutagenesis" technique resulted in the discovery of a group of genes involved in the development of body segmentation, helping to found the field of evolutionary developmental biology.

Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

Nobel PrizeNobel Prize in MedicineMedicine
She won the Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research in 1991 and the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1995, together with Eric Wieschaus and Edward B. Lewis, for their research on the genetic control of embryonic development.
Twelve women have received the prize: Gerty Cori (1947), Rosalyn Yalow (1977), Barbara McClintock (1983), Rita Levi-Montalcini (1986), Gertrude B. Elion (1988), Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard (1995), Linda B. Buck (2004), Françoise Barré-Sinoussi (2008), Elizabeth H. Blackburn (2009), Carol W. Greider (2009), May-Britt Moser (2014) and Youyou Tu (for her discovery of artemisinin)(2015).

Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize

Leibniz PrizeGottfried Wilhelm Leibniz-PrizeLeibniz Award
In 1986, she received the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, which is the highest honour awarded in German research.
Stefan Hell (2008), Gerd Faltings (1996), Peter Gruss (1994), Svante Pääbo (1992), Theodor W. Hänsch (1989), Erwin Neher (1987), Bert Sakmann (1987), Jürgen Habermas (1986), Hartmut Michel (1986), and Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard (1986).

Toll-like receptor

Toll-like receptorsTLRToll
Nüsslein-Volhard is associated with the discovery of Toll, which led to the identification of toll-like receptors.
TLR's received their name from their similarity to the protein coded by the toll gene identified in Drosophila in 1985 by Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard and Eric Wieschaus.

Eric F. Wieschaus

Eric WieschausWieschaus
She won the Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research in 1991 and the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1995, together with Eric Wieschaus and Edward B. Lewis, for their research on the genetic control of embryonic development.
In 1995, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Edward B. Lewis and Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard as co-recipients, for their work revealing the genetic control of embryonic development.

Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology

Max Planck Institute for Virus Researchthe Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology in Tübingen
Since 1985 Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard has been Director of the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology in Tübingen and also leads its Genetics Department.

Drosophila embryogenesis

Drosophila'' embryogenesisembryogenesisnanos
Later, researchers identified exactly which gene had been affected by each mutation, thereby identifying a set of genes crucial for Drosophila embryogenesis.
In 1995, the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine was awarded for studies concerning the genetic control of early embryonic development to Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard, Edward B. Lewis and Eric Wieschaus.

Tübingen

Tübingen, GermanyDerendingenDerendingen, Germany
Since 1985 Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard has been Director of the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology in Tübingen and also leads its Genetics Department.
Tübingen also is the home of scholars of international renown such as the Idealist philosopher Immanuel Hermann von Fichte, the theologian Hans Küng, textual criticism pioneer F.C. Baur, jurisprudent Gerhard Anschütz, famous author Walter Jens, and developmental biologist Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard.

University of Duisburg-Essen

University of EssenUniversität Duisburg-EssenUniversity Duisburg-Essen

List of fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1990

Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS) in 199019901990: Elected a Foreign Member of the Royal Society (ForMemRS)

European Molecular Biology Laboratory

EMBLEuropean Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL)EMBO
The first systematic genetic analysis of embryonic development in the fruit fly was conducted at EMBL by Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard and Eric Wieschaus, for which they were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1995.

Edward B. Lewis

Ed LewisEdward LewisEdward B Lewis
She won the Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research in 1991 and the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1995, together with Eric Wieschaus and Edward B. Lewis, for their research on the genetic control of embryonic development.

Genetics

geneticgeneticistgenetically
She won the Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research in 1991 and the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1995, together with Eric Wieschaus and Edward B. Lewis, for their research on the genetic control of embryonic development.

Embryo

embryosembryonalhuman embryos
She won the Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research in 1991 and the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1995, together with Eric Wieschaus and Edward B. Lewis, for their research on the genetic control of embryonic development.

Developmental biology

developmentdevelopmental biologistdevelopmental
She won the Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research in 1991 and the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1995, together with Eric Wieschaus and Edward B. Lewis, for their research on the genetic control of embryonic development. Christiane (Janni) Nüsslein-Volhard (born 20 October 1942) is a German developmental biologist and 1995 Nobel Prize-winner.