Christianity

ChristianChristiansChristian faithChristian religionChristianizedChristian churchChristian churchesChristian beliefsChristian beliefChristianization
Christianity is an Abrahamic monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth.wikipedia
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Christians

ChristianNasranibelievers
Its adherents, known as Christians, believe that Jesus is the Christ, whose coming as the messiah was prophesied in the Hebrew Bible, called the Old Testament in Christianity, and chronicled in the New Testament.
Christians are people who follow or adhere to Christianity, a monotheistic Abrahamic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus Christ.

Abrahamic religions

AbrahamicAbrahamic religionAbrahamic faiths
Christianity is an Abrahamic monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth.
Abrahamic religion spread globally through Christianity being adopted by the Roman Empire in the 4th century and Islam by the Islamic Empires from the 7th century.

Monotheism

monotheisticmonotheistmonotheists
Christianity is an Abrahamic monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth.
The broader definition of monotheism characterizes the traditions of Bábism, the Bahá'í Faith, Balinese Hinduism, Cao Dai (Caodaiism), Cheondoism (Cheondogyo), Christianity, Deism, Eckankar, Hindu sects such as Shaivism and Vaishnavism, Islam, Judaism, Mandaeism, Rastafari, Seicho no Ie, Sikhism, Tengrism (Tangrism), Tenrikyo (Tenriism), Yazidism, and Zoroastrianism, and elements of pre-monotheistic thought are found in early religions such as Atenism, ancient Chinese religion, and Yahwism.

New Testament

NewThe New TestamentNew Testaments
Its adherents, known as Christians, believe that Jesus is the Christ, whose coming as the messiah was prophesied in the Hebrew Bible, called the Old Testament in Christianity, and chronicled in the New Testament.
While the Old Testament canon varies somewhat between different Christian denominations, the 27-book canon of the New Testament has been almost universally recognized within Christianity since at least Late Antiquity.

Jewish Christian

Jewish Christiansorigins of ChristianityJewish Christianity
Christianity began as a Second Temple Judaic sect in the 1st century in the Roman province of Judea. It soon attracted gentile God-fearers, which led to a departure from Jewish customs, and, after the Fall of Jerusalem, AD 70 which ended the Temple-based Judaism, Christianity slowly separated from Judaism.
The split of Christianity and Judaism took place during the first centuries CE.

Church of the East

NestorianNestorian ChurchNestorians
The Church of the East split after the Council of Ephesus (431) and Oriental Orthodoxy split after the Council of Chalcedon (451) over differences in Christology, while the Eastern Orthodox Church and the Catholic Church separated in the East–West Schism (1054), especially over the authority of the bishop of Rome.
The Church of the East ( ʽĒttāʾ d-Maḏenḥā), also called the Persian Church or Nestorian Church, was a Christian church of the East Syriac rite established 410.

Religion

religiousreligionsreligious beliefs
Christianity is an Abrahamic monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth.
There are an estimated 10,000 distinct religions worldwide, but about 84% of the world's population is affiliated with one of the five largest religion groups, namely Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism or forms of folk religion.

Christian theology

Christian doctrineChristian theologiantheology
Similarly, Protestantism split in numerous denominations from the Latin Catholic Church in the Reformation era (16th century) over theological and ecclesiological disputes, most predominantly on the issue of justification and the primacy of the bishop of Rome.
Christian theology is the theology of Christian belief and practice.

Christian mission

missionmissionsChristian missionaries
Following the Age of Discovery (15th–17th century), Christianity was spread into the Americas, Oceania, sub-Saharan Africa, and the rest of the world via missionary work.
A Christian mission is an organized effort to spread Christianity to new converts.

Ethiopia

EthiopianAbyssiniaFederal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia
Jesus' apostles and their followers spread around Syria, the Levant, Europe, Anatolia, Mesopotamia, Transcaucasia, Egypt, and Ethiopia, despite initial persecution.
A majority of the population adheres to Christianity (mainly the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church and P'ent'ay) and the historical Kingdom of Aksum was one of the first states to officially adopt the religion, whereas around a third follows Islam (primarily Sunni).

Passion of Jesus

PassionPassion of Christthe Passion
Their creeds generally hold in common Jesus as the Son of God—the logos incarnated—who ministred, suffered, and died on a cross, but rose from the dead for the salvation of mankind; as referred to as the gospel, meaning the "good news", in the Bible (scripture).
In Christianity, the Passion (from the Latin verb: patior, passus sum ("to suffer, bear, endure", from which also "patience, patient", etc.) is the short final period in the life of Jesus.

Age of Discovery

Age of ExplorationAge of Discoveriesexplorer
Following the Age of Discovery (15th–17th century), Christianity was spread into the Americas, Oceania, sub-Saharan Africa, and the rest of the world via missionary work.
It also allowed for the expansion of Christianity throughout the world: with the spread of missionary activity, it eventually became the world's largest religion.

Judaism

JewishJewsJudaic
It soon attracted gentile God-fearers, which led to a departure from Jewish customs, and, after the Fall of Jerusalem, AD 70 which ended the Temple-based Judaism, Christianity slowly separated from Judaism.
Judaism's texts, traditions and values strongly influenced later Abrahamic religions, including Christianity, Islam and the Baha'i Faith.

Constantine the Great

Constantine IConstantineEmperor Constantine
Emperor Constantine the Great converted to Christianity before his death (337), and was baptized by bishop Eusebius of Nicomedia; Constantine decriminalized Christianity in the Roman Empire by the Edict of Milan (313), later convening the Council of Nicaea (325) where Early Christianity was consolidated into what would become the State church of the Roman Empire (380).
Constantine was the first Roman emperor to convert to Christianity.

Gospel

Gospelscanonical gospelsFour Gospels
Describing Jesus' life and teachings are the four canonical gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John with the Jewish Old Testament as the gospel's respected background.
Gospel originally meant the Christian message itself, but in the 2nd century it came to be used for the books in which the message was set out.

The gospel

Good NewsGospelGospel of Jesus Christ
Their creeds generally hold in common Jesus as the Son of God—the logos incarnated—who ministred, suffered, and died on a cross, but rose from the dead for the salvation of mankind; as referred to as the gospel, meaning the "good news", in the Bible (scripture).
In Christianity, the gospel (gōdspel; ēvangelium, ), or the Good News, is the news of the coming of the Kingdom of God ( Mark 1:14-15).

Messiah

messianicmessianic figurePromised Messiah
Its adherents, known as Christians, believe that Jesus is the Christ, whose coming as the messiah was prophesied in the Hebrew Bible, called the Old Testament in Christianity, and chronicled in the New Testament.
In Christianity, the Messiah is called the Christ, from χριστός, translating the Hebrew word of the same meaning.

Religious text

scripturescripturesHoly Scripture
Their creeds generally hold in common Jesus as the Son of God—the logos incarnated—who ministred, suffered, and died on a cross, but rose from the dead for the salvation of mankind; as referred to as the gospel, meaning the "good news", in the Bible (scripture).
In others (Christianity), the canonical texts include a particular text (Bible) but is "an unsettled question", according to Eugene Nida.

Disciple (Christianity)

disciplesdisciplediscipleship
According to Acts 11:26, the term "Christian" was first used in reference to Jesus's disciples in the city of Antioch, meaning "followers of Christ," by the non-Jewish inhabitants of Antioch.
In Christianity, disciple primarily refers to a dedicated follower of Jesus.

List of Christian denominations

Christian denominationsdenominationsChristian denomination
Adventist, Baptist, Methodist, Pentecostal, and other Protestant confessions arose in the following centuries.
A Christian denomination is a distinct religious body within Christianity, identified by traits such as a name, organization, and doctrine.

Persecution of Christians

persecutionanti-Christianpersecuted
Christians are the most persecuted religious group in the world, especially in the Middle-East, Southeast and East Asia, and sub-Saharan Africa.
Christian missionaries as well as converts to Christianity have been the target of persecution ever since the emergence of Christianity, sometimes to the point of being martyred for their faith.

Americas

Americathe AmericasAmerican
Following the Age of Discovery (15th–17th century), Christianity was spread into the Americas, Oceania, sub-Saharan Africa, and the rest of the world via missionary work.
Currently, almost all of the population of the Americas resides in independent countries; however, the legacy of the colonization and settlement by Europeans is that the Americas share many common cultural traits, most notably Christianity and the use of Indo-European languages: primarily Spanish, English, Portuguese, French, and, to a lesser extent, Dutch.

Apostles' Creed

Apostles CreedApostle's CreedApostles
The Apostles' Creed (Latin: Symbolum Apostolorum or Symbolum Apostolicum), sometimes titled the Apostolic Creed or the Symbol of the Apostles, is an early statement of Christian belief—a creed or "symbol".

Western Christianity

Western ChristianWestWestern
Christianity remains culturally diverse in its Western and Eastern branches, as well as in its doctrines concerning justification and the nature of salvation, ecclesiology, ordination, and Christology.
Western Christianity is a branch of Christianity, composed of the Latin Church and Protestantism, together with their offshoots such as Independent Catholicism and Restorationism.

Creed

confession of faithstatement of faithArticles of Faith
Their creeds generally hold in common Jesus as the Son of God—the logos incarnated—who ministred, suffered, and died on a cross, but rose from the dead for the salvation of mankind; as referred to as the gospel, meaning the "good news", in the Bible (scripture).
One of the most widely used creeds in Christianity is the Nicene Creed, first formulated in AD 325 at the First Council of Nicaea.