An Eastern Christian icon depicting Emperor Constantine and the Fathers of the First Council of Nicaea (325) as holding the Niceno–Constantinopolitan Creed of 381.
The 17th-century painting Christ Crucified by Diego Velázquez, held by the Museo del Prado in Madrid
Various depictions of Jesus
A depiction of the Raising of the Cross, by Sebastiano Mazzoni, 17th century, Ca' Rezzonico
Crucifixion, representing the death of Jesus on the Cross, painting by Diego Velázquez, c. 1632.
Bronzino's depiction of the crucifixion with three nails, no ropes, and a hypopodium standing support, c. 1545.
The Law and the Gospel by Lucas Cranach the Elder (1529); Moses and Elijah point the sinner to Jesus for salvation.
Christ on the Cross between two thieves. Illumination from the Vaux Passional, 16th century
The Trinity is the belief that God is one God in three persons: the Father, the Son (Jesus), and the Holy Spirit.
Crucifixion, from the Buhl Altarpiece, a particularly large Gothic oil on panel painting from the 1490s.
Midnight Mass at a Catholic parish church in Woodside, New York City, U.S.
Crucifixion of Jesus of Nazareth, medieval illustration from the Hortus deliciarum of Herrad of Landsberg, 12th century
Show on the life of Jesus at Igreja da Cidade in São José dos Campos, affiliated to the Brazilian Baptist Convention.
Andrea di Bartolo, Way to Calvary, c. 1400. The cluster of halos at the left are the Virgin Mary in front, with the Three Marys.
An early circular ichthys symbol, created by combining the Greek letters ΙΧΘΥΣ into a wheel, Ephesus, Asia Minor.
A diagram of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre and the historical site
The Bible is the sacred book in Christianity.
The dead Christ with the Virgin, John the Evangelist and Mary Magdalene. Unknown painter of the 18th century
St. Peter's Basilica, Vatican City, the largest church in the world and a symbol of the Catholic Church.
Crucifixion of Jesus on a two-beamed cross, from the Sainte Bible (1866)
The 7th-century Khor Virap monastery in the shadow of Mount Ararat; Armenia was the first state to adopt Christianity as the state religion, in AD 301.
Torture stake, a simple wooden torture stake. Image by Justus Lipsius.
The Monastery of St. Matthew, located atop Mount Alfaf in northern Iraq, is recognized as one of the oldest Christian monasteries in existence.
Crucifixion, seen from the Cross, by James Tissot, c. 1890, Brooklyn Museum
Kadisha Valley, Lebanon, home to some of the earliest Christian monasteries in the world.
Christ on the Cross, by Carl Heinrich Bloch, showing the skies darkened
Christendom by A.D. 600 after its spread to Africa and Europe from the Middle East.
Bronzino's Deposition of Christ
An example of Byzantine pictorial art, the Deësis mosaic at the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople.
Adoration of the Mystic Lamb (detail of the Ghent Altarpiece, Jan van Eyck, c. 1432). Christ is represented as the sacrificial Lamb of God.
Pope Urban II at the Council of Clermont, where he preached the First Crusade. Illustration by Jean Colombe from a copy of the Passages d'outremer, c. 1490.
Detail of the countenance of Christ just dead, by José Luján Pérez, 1793, Las Palmas Cathedral
Martin Luther initiated the Reformation with his Ninety-five Theses in 1517.
Betrayal of Christ, stained glass, Gotland, Sweden, 1240
Michelangelo's 1498–99 Pietà in St. Peter's Basilica; the Catholic Church was among the patronages of the Renaissance.
Mateo Cerezo, Ecce Homo, 1650
A depiction of Madonna and Child in a 19th-century Kakure Kirishitan Japanese woodcut.
Carrying the Cross fresco, Decani monastery, Serbia, 14th century
A Christian procession in Brazil, the country with the largest Catholic population in the world.
Orthodox Crucifixion icon, Athens, Greece
Trinity Sunday in Russia; the Russian Orthodox Church has experienced a great revival since the fall of communism.
Crucifixion of Christ, Michelangelo, 1540
The global distribution of Christians: Countries colored a darker shade have a higher proportion of Christians.
Print of the Crucifixion, made at the end of the 16th century<ref>{{Cite web|title=De Kruisiging|url=https://lib.ugent.be/viewer/archive.ugent.be:B4D16A3C-15CD-11E9-954B-23312282636C#?c=&m=&s=&cv=&xywh=-2876,-181,8131,3613|access-date=2020-09-28|website=lib.ugent.be}}</ref>
Pope Francis, the current leader of the Catholic Church.
Calvary by Paolo Veronese, 16th century
St. George's Cathedral in Istanbul: It has been the seat of the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople whose leader is regarded as the primus inter pares in the Eastern Orthodox Church.
From a 14th–15th century Welsh Manuscript
Holy Trinity Cathedral in Addis Ababa, the seat of the Ethiopian Orthodox.
Pietro Lorenzetti fresco, Assisi Basilica, 1310–1329
A 6th-century Nestorian church, St. John the Arab, in the Assyrian village of Geramon in Hakkari, southeastern Turkey.
Descent from the Cross, Rubens (1616–17)
Saint Mary Church; an ancient Assyrian church located in the city of Urmia, Iran.
Descent from the Cross, Raphael, 1507
A 19th-century drawing of Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery receiving the Aaronic priesthood from John the Baptist. Latter Day Saints believe that the Priesthood ceased to exist after the death of the apostles and therefore needed to be restored.
Unitarian Church of Transylvania in Cluj-Napoca.
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A copy of the Summa Theologica by Thomas Aquinas, a famous Christian apologetic work.
Christians fleeing their homes in the Ottoman Empire, circa 1922. Many Christians were persecuted and/or killed during the Armenian genocide, Greek genocide, and Assyrian genocide.
Countries with 50% or more Christians are colored purple; countries with 10% to 50% Christians are colored pink
Nations with Christianity as their state religion are in blue
Distribution of Catholics
Distribution of Protestants
Distribution of Eastern Orthodox
Distribution of Oriental Orthodox
Distribution of other Christians
Links between interdenominational movements and other developments within Protestantism
Historical chart of the main Protestant branches
The Cenacle on Mount Zion in Jerusalem, claimed to be the location of the Last Supper and Pentecost.
A folio from Papyrus 46, an early-3rd-century collection of Pauline epistles

The creeds of various Christian denominations generally hold in common Jesus as the Son of God—the Logos incarnated—who ministered, suffered, and died on a cross, but rose from the dead for the salvation of mankind; and referred to as the gospel, meaning the "good news".

- Christianity

However, the belief in the redemptive nature of Jesus' death predates the Pauline letters and goes back to the earliest days of Christianity and the Jerusalem church.

- Crucifixion of Jesus
An Eastern Christian icon depicting Emperor Constantine and the Fathers of the First Council of Nicaea (325) as holding the Niceno–Constantinopolitan Creed of 381.

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Jesus

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Jesus (c.

Jesus (c.

Counter-clockwise from top-right: Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek, Latin, and English transcriptions of the name Jesus
A 3rd-century Greek papyrus of the Gospel of Luke
Adoration of the Shepherds by Gerard van Honthorst, 1622
The Circumcision by Giovanni Bellini, ~1500. The work depicts the circumcision of Jesus.
The Finding of the Saviour in the Temple, by William Holman Hunt, 1860
The Baptism of Christ by John the Baptist, by José Ferraz de Almeida Júnior, 1895
Sermon on the Mount, by Carl Bloch, 1877, depicts Jesus' important discourse
The Exhortation to the Apostles, by James Tissot, portrays Jesus talking to his 12 disciples
Jesus and the rich young man by Heinrich Hofmann, 1889
The Return of the Prodigal Son by Pompeo Batoni depicts the Parable of the Prodigal Son. Jesus told many parables during his ministry.
Jesus cleansing a leper, medieval mosaic from the Monreale Cathedral, late 12th to mid-13th centuries
The Transfiguration of Jesus, depicted by Carl Bloch, 19th century
A painting of Jesus' final entry into Jerusalem, by Jean-Léon Gérôme, 1897
The Last Supper, depicted by Juan de Juanes, c. 1562
A depiction of the kiss of Judas and arrest of Jesus, by Caravaggio, c. 1602
Ecce homo! Antonio Ciseri's 1871 depiction of Pontius Pilate presenting Jesus to the public
Pietro Perugino's depiction of the Crucifixion as Stabat Mater, 1482
Appearance of Jesus Christ to Maria Magdalena by Alexander Andreyevich Ivanov, 1835
A 3rd century depiction of Jesus as the Good Shepherd
Judea, Galilee and neighboring areas at the time of Jesus
A 1640 edition of the works of Josephus, a 1st-century Roman-Jewish historian who referred to Jesus.
Baptism in the Jordan River, the river where Jesus was baptized
The Resurrection of Christ from a 16th-century manuscript of La Passion de Nostre Seigneur
The ethnicity of Jesus in art has been influenced by cultural settings.
The Trinity is the belief in Christianity that God is one God in three persons: God the Father, God the Son (Jesus), and God the Holy Spirit.
Jesus is depicted with the Alpha and Omega letters in the catacombs of Rome from the 4th century.
The name Jesus son of Mary written in Islamic calligraphy followed by Peace be upon him
The Druze maqam of Al-masih (Jesus) in As-Suwayda Governorate.
Enthroned Jesus image on a Manichaean temple banner from c. 10th-century Qocho
Jesus healing a paralytic in one of the first known images of Jesus from Dura Europos in the 3rd century
The Shroud of Turin, Italy, is the best-known claimed relic of Jesus and one of the most studied artifacts in human history.
Jesus depicted as the liberator of Black slaves, on the masthead of the Abolitionist paper "The Liberator".

He is the central figure of Christianity, the world's largest religion.

He was arrested and tried by the Jewish authorities, turned over to the Roman government, and crucified on the order of Pontius Pilate, the Roman prefect of Jerusalem.

A 'Jesus Saves' neon cross sign outside of a Protestant church in New York City

Salvation in Christianity

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A 'Jesus Saves' neon cross sign outside of a Protestant church in New York City

In Christianity, salvation (also called deliverance or redemption) is the "saving [of] human beings from sin and its consequences, which include death and separation from God" by Christ's death and resurrection, and the justification following this salvation.

Resurrection of Jesus Christ (Kinnaird Resurrection) by Raphael, 1502

Resurrection of Jesus

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Resurrection of Jesus Christ (Kinnaird Resurrection) by Raphael, 1502
Five part resurrection icon, Solovetsky Monastery, 17th century
Resurrection of Christ, Noël Coypel, 1700, using a hovering depiction of Jesus
Germain Pilon (French, d. 1590), Resurrection of Jesus Christ. Marble, before 1572
The three Marys at the Tomb of Christ (1470) at the west portal of Konstanz Minster, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
Right wing of the winged triptych at the Church of the Teutonic Order, Vienna, Austria. The artwork depicts Christ's crucifixion and burial (left), and resurrection (right).
The Chi Rho with a wreath symbolizing the victory of the Resurrection, above Roman soldiers, c. 350 AD.
Secondo Pia's 1898 negative of the image on the Shroud of Turin has an appearance suggesting a positive image. It is used as part of the devotion to the Holy Face of Jesus.
A rotunda in Church of the Holy Sepulchre, called the Anastasis ("Resurrection"), which contains the remains of a rock-cut room that Helena and Macarius identified as the burial site of Jesus.
Resurrection of Christ, by Hans Memling, 15th century
Resurrection, by Luca Giordano, after 1665
Resurrection, by Hans Multscher, 1437
Resurrection, by Dieric Bouts, {{circa|1450–1460}}
Der Auferstanden, by Lucas Cranach, 1558
Piero della Francesca, 15th century
The Resurrection of Christ, {{interlanguage link|Alonso López de Herrera|es}}, {{circa|1625}}
The Resurrection (La Résurrection) – James Tissot, c. 1890, Brooklyn Museum
Resurrection of Jesus, by Anton von Werner, Berlin Cathedral
Stained glass depiction with two Marys, Lutheran Church, South Carolina
Women at the empty tomb, by Fra Angelico, 1437–1446

The resurrection of Jesus is the Christian belief that God raised Jesus on the third day after his crucifixion, starting – or restoring – his exalted life as Christ and Lord.

Funerary stele of Licinia Amias on marble, in the National Roman Museum. One of the earliest Christian inscriptions found, it comes from the early 3rd century Vatican necropolis area in Rome. It contains the text ΙΧΘΥϹ ΖΩΝΤΩΝ ("fish of the living"), a predecessor of the Ichthys symbol.

History of Christianity

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Funerary stele of Licinia Amias on marble, in the National Roman Museum. One of the earliest Christian inscriptions found, it comes from the early 3rd century Vatican necropolis area in Rome. It contains the text ΙΧΘΥϹ ΖΩΝΤΩΝ ("fish of the living"), a predecessor of the Ichthys symbol.
The eastern Mediterranean region in the time of Paul the Apostle
Christ Jesus, the Good Shepherd, 3rd century
St. Lawrence (martyred 258) before Emperor Valerianus by Fra Angelico
A folio from Papyrus 46, an early-3rd-century collection of Pauline epistles
Virgin and Child. Wall painting from the early Roman catacombs, 4th century.
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Icon depicting the Emperor Constantine (centre) and the bishops of the First Council of Nicaea (325) holding the Niceno–Constantinopolitan Creed of 381.
Imagined portrait of Arius; detail of a Cretan School icon, c. 1591, depicting the First Council of Nicaea.
The ceiling mosaic of the Arian Baptistery, built in Ravenna by the Ostrogothic King Theodoric the Great.
An Eastern Roman mosaic showing a basilica with towers, mounted with Christian crosses, 5th century, Louvre
The Church of the East during the Middle Ages
Coptic icon of St. Anthony the Great, father of Christian monasticism and early anchorite. The Coptic inscription reads ‘Ⲡⲓⲛⲓϣϯ Ⲁⲃⲃⲁ Ⲁⲛⲧⲱⲛⲓ’ ("the Great Father Anthony").
A mosaic of Justinian I in the Basilica of San Vitale, Ravenna, Italy
Roderick is venerated as one of the Martyrs of Córdoba
Raid on the Monastery of Zobe and the death of hegumenos Michael and his 36 brothers, depicted in the Menologion of Basil II.
"Hospitality of Abraham", icon by Andrei Rublev; the three angels represent the Godhead according to Trinitarian Christians.
Western Europe, the Holy Roman Empire, Kievan Rus', and the Byzantine Empire in the Middle Ages (year 1000)
The spread of Cistercians from their original sites in Western-Central Europe during the Middle Ages
Henry IV, the Holy Roman Emperor at the gate of Canossa Castle in 1077, during the Investiture controversy.
The Kingdom of Jerusalem and the Crusader states with their strongholds in the Holy Land at their height, between the First and the Second Crusade (1135)
St. Cyril and St. Methodius monument on Mt. Radhošť
Christianization of Kievan Rus', the first unified federation of Slavic tribes
Christianization of Moravia under the rule of Rastislav
Jan Hus defending his theses at the Council of Constance (1415), painting by the Czech artist Václav Brožík
Michelangelo's Pietà (1498–99) in St. Peter's Basilica, Vatican City
American Discovery Viewed by Native Americans (Thomas Hart Benton, 1922). European discovery and colonization had disastrous effects on the Indigenous peoples of the Americas and their societies.
The Council in Santa Maria Maggiore church; Museo Diocesiano Tridentino, Trento
Galileo before the Holy Office, a 19th-century painting by Joseph-Nicolas Robert-Fleury
Philipp Spener, the founder of Pietism
Churches of the Moscow Kremlin, as seen from the Balchug
Demolition of the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour in Moscow on the orders of Joseph Stalin, 5 December 1931, consistent with the doctrine of state atheism in the USSR
Pope Pius XI
Laying on of hands during a service in a neo-charismatic church in Ghana

The history of Christianity concerns the Christian religion, Christian countries, and the Christians with their various denominations, from the 1st century to the present.

Christianity originated with the ministry of Jesus, a Jewish teacher and healer who proclaimed the imminent Kingdom of God and was crucified c. AD 30–33 in Jerusalem in the Roman province of Judea.

Paolo Veronese, The Resurrection of Jesus Christ (ca. 1560).

Christology

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Paolo Veronese, The Resurrection of Jesus Christ (ca. 1560).
Christ Pantocrator, Holy Trinity's monastery, Meteora, Greece
Saint Paul delivering the Areopagus sermon in Athens, by Raphael, 1515
The Four Evangelists, by Pieter Soutman, 17th century
Christological spectrum during the 5th–7th centuries showing the views of the Church of the East (light blue), the Eastern Orthodox and Catholic Churches (light purple), and the Miaphysite Churches (pink).

In Christianity, Christology (from Greek Χριστός Khristós and -λογία, -logia), translated literally from Greek as "the study of Christ", is a branch of theology that concerns Jesus.

Ransom theory of atonement, which teaches that the death of Christ was a ransom sacrifice, usually said to have been paid to Satan or to death itself, in some views paid to God the Father, in satisfaction for the bondage and debt on the souls of humanity as a result of inherited sin. Gustaf Aulén reinterpreted the ransom theory, calling it the Christus Victor doctrine, arguing that Christ's death was not a payment to the Devil, but defeated the powers of evil, which had held humankind in their dominion.;

Thomas Aquinas from Valle Romita Polyptych by Gentile da Fabriano

Christian theology

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Thomas Aquinas from Valle Romita Polyptych by Gentile da Fabriano
Rembrandt's The Evangelist Matthew Inspired by an Angel, 1661
Christ in Gethsemane, Heinrich Hofmann, 1890
"Holy Trinity" from the Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow, by Andrei Rublev, c. 1400, but more properly known as the "Hospitality of Abraham." The three angels symbolize the Trinity.
The various Christological positions, and their names
Jesus, believed to be both man and God, painting by Carl Heinrich Bloch
A depiction of Jesus and Mary, the Theotokos of Vladimir (12th century)
Holy Doors from Saint Catherine's Monastery, Mount Sinai, depicting the Annunciation, c. 12th century
The Resurrection of Christ by Carl Heinrich Bloch, 1875.
Statue of the Fallen Angel, Retiro Park (Madrid, Spain).
Dante and Beatrice gaze upon the highest heavens; from Gustave Doré's illustrations to the Divine Comedy.
Hell as depicted in Hieronymus Bosch's triptych The Garden of Earthly Delights (c. 1504).
A Sistine Chapel fresco depicts the expulsion of Adam and Eve from the garden of Eden for their sin of eating from the fruit of the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil.
Augustine of Hippo wrote that original sin is transmitted by concupiscence and enfeebles freedom of the will without destroying it.
Christ with the Eucharist by Vicente Juan Masip, 16th century.
Detail from the Last Judgement by Michelangelo

Christian theology is the theology of Christian belief and practice.

The biblical accounts of Jesus' ministry include miracles, preaching, teaching, healing, Death, and resurrection.

Saint John indicating Christ to Saint Andrew by Ottavio Vannini, 17th century

Jesus in Christianity

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Saint John indicating Christ to Saint Andrew by Ottavio Vannini, 17th century
First page of Mark, by Sargis Pitsak (14th century): "The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God".
Nativity at Night, by Geertgen tot Sint Jans, c. 1490
The Communion of the Apostles, by Luca Signorelli, 1512
A Gospel of John, 1056
Jesus' Farewell Discourse to his eleven remaining disciples after the Last Supper, from the Maestà by Duccio.
The Good Samaritan is a painting by James Tissot. The Parable of the Good Samaritan is one of the parables of Jesus.
Jesus healing the paralytic in The Pool by Palma il Giovane, 1592
Depictions of the Resurrection of Jesus are central to Christian art (Resurrection of Christ by Raphael, 1499–1502)

In Christianity, Jesus is the Son of God and in mainstream Christian denominations he is God the Son, the second person in the Trinity.

It is believed that through his crucifixion and subsequent resurrection, God offered humans salvation and eternal life, that Jesus died to atone for sin to make humanity right with God.

A 15th century depiction of Jesus crucified between the two thieves

Crucifixion

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Method of capital punishment in which the victim is tied or nailed to a large wooden cross or beam and left to hang until eventual death from exhaustion and asphyxiation.

Method of capital punishment in which the victim is tied or nailed to a large wooden cross or beam and left to hang until eventual death from exhaustion and asphyxiation.

A 15th century depiction of Jesus crucified between the two thieves
Gabriel von Max's 1866 painting Martyress depicts a crucified young woman and a young man laying flowers at her feet
Crucifixion window by Henry E. Sharp, 1872, in St. Matthew's German Evangelical Lutheran Church, Charleston, South Carolina
Early Meiji period crucifixion (c. 1865–1868), Yokohama, Japan. A 25-year-old servant, Sokichi, was executed by crucifixion for murdering his employer's son during the course of a robbery. He was affixed by tying to a stake with two cross-pieces.
The Twenty Six Martyrs of Japan
Poster showing a German soldier nailing a man to a tree, as American soldiers come to his rescue. Published in Manila by Bureau of Printing (1917).
Prisoner kneeling on chains, thumbs supporting arms, photographic print on stereo card, Mukden, China (c. 1906)
Devotional crucifixion in San Fernando, Pampanga, Philippines, Easter 2006
Sculpture construction: Crucifixion, homage to Mondrian, by Barbara Hepworth, United Kingdom (2007)
Allegory of Poland (1914–1918), postcard by Sergey Solomko
Car-float at the feast of the Virgin of San Juan de los Lagos, Colonia Doctores, Mexico City (2011)
Antisemitic American political cartoon, Sound Money magazine, April 15, 1896 issue
Protester tied to a cross in Washington D.C. (1970)
Crucifixion, by Jan Van Eyck (c. 1430-1440)
Christ crucified, by Diego Velázquez (1632)

The crucifixion of Jesus of Nazareth is central to Christianity, and the cross (sometimes depicting Jesus nailed to it) is the main religious symbol for many Christian churches.

Judaea (Roman province)

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Roman province which incorporated the regions of Judea, Samaria, and Idumea, and extended over parts of the former regions of the Hasmonean and Herodian kingdoms of Judea.

Roman province which incorporated the regions of Judea, Samaria, and Idumea, and extended over parts of the former regions of the Hasmonean and Herodian kingdoms of Judea.

Pompey in the Temple of Jerusalem, by Jean Fouquet
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Old Roman era gate, Bab al-'Amud in Jerusalem's Old City (today part of Damascus Gate)
Roman stepped road in the Shephelah hill country of Judea (adjacent to Highway 375)

The crucifixion of Jesus took place circa 30–33 CE, and his earliest followers had formed an apocalyptic messianic sect which later developed into Christianity.

Christ Crowned with Thorns by Matthias Stom (c. 1633–1639) shows Jesus in his Passion as the "Lord of Patience" with the crown of thorns and scepter reed, being mocked by Roman soldiers.

Passion of Jesus

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Christ Crowned with Thorns by Matthias Stom (c. 1633–1639) shows Jesus in his Passion as the "Lord of Patience" with the crown of thorns and scepter reed, being mocked by Roman soldiers.
Icon of the Passion, detail showing (left) the Flagellation and (right) Ascent to Golgotha (fresco by Theophanes the Cretan, Stavronikita Monastery, Mount Athos).
Crucifixion by Albrecht Altdorfer (c. 1526)
The Veil of Veronica, painting by Domenico Fetti (c. 1620).
Christ as Man of Sorrows by Pietro Lorenzetti, c. 1330 (Lindenau-Museum, Altenburg)
Fragment of the Pillar of the Flagellation, Hagios Georgios Patriarchal Church, Istanbul.
The Arma Christi on the back of an Austrian altarpiece of 1468.
El Greco's Jesus Carrying the Cross, 1580.
A set of the Stations of the Cross in painted enamel.
Fresco depicting the trial and beating of Jesus (17th century, St. John the Baptist Church, Yaroslavl, Russia).
Russian Orthodox icon of the Passion with scenes of the martyrdom of the Twelve Apostles, symbolizing how all are called to enter into the Passion (Moscow Kremlin).
Christian Easter passion procession in Stuttgart, Germany
Reenacting the Stations of the Cross in Jerusalem on the Via Dolorosa from the Lions' Gate to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre.

In Christianity, the Passion (from the Latin verb patior, passus sum; "to suffer, bear, endure", from which also "patience, patient", etc.) is the short final period in the life of Jesus Christ.

Depending on one's views, the "Passion" may include, among other events, Jesus' triumphal entry into Jerusalem, his cleansing of the Temple, his anointing, the Last Supper, Jesus' agony in the Garden, his arrest, his Sanhedrin trial, his trial before Pontius Pilate, his crucifixion and his death on Good Friday, his burial, and the resurrection of Jesus.