A report on Christianity

An Eastern Christian icon depicting Emperor Constantine and the Fathers of the First Council of Nicaea (325) as holding the Niceno–Constantinopolitan Creed of 381.
Various depictions of Jesus
Crucifixion, representing the death of Jesus on the Cross, painting by Diego Velázquez, c. 1632.
The Law and the Gospel by Lucas Cranach the Elder (1529); Moses and Elijah point the sinner to Jesus for salvation.
The Trinity is the belief that God is one God in three persons: the Father, the Son (Jesus), and the Holy Spirit.
Midnight Mass at a Catholic parish church in Woodside, New York City, U.S.
Show on the life of Jesus at Igreja da Cidade in São José dos Campos, affiliated to the Brazilian Baptist Convention.
An early circular ichthys symbol, created by combining the Greek letters ΙΧΘΥΣ into a wheel, Ephesus, Asia Minor.
The Bible is the sacred book in Christianity.
St. Peter's Basilica, Vatican City, the largest church in the world and a symbol of the Catholic Church.
The 7th-century Khor Virap monastery in the shadow of Mount Ararat; Armenia was the first state to adopt Christianity as the state religion, in AD 301.
The Monastery of St. Matthew, located atop Mount Alfaf in northern Iraq, is recognized as one of the oldest Christian monasteries in existence.
Kadisha Valley, Lebanon, home to some of the earliest Christian monasteries in the world.
Christendom by A.D. 600 after its spread to Africa and Europe from the Middle East.
An example of Byzantine pictorial art, the Deësis mosaic at the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople.
Pope Urban II at the Council of Clermont, where he preached the First Crusade. Illustration by Jean Colombe from a copy of the Passages d'outremer, c. 1490.
Martin Luther initiated the Reformation with his Ninety-five Theses in 1517.
Michelangelo's 1498–99 Pietà in St. Peter's Basilica; the Catholic Church was among the patronages of the Renaissance.
A depiction of Madonna and Child in a 19th-century Kakure Kirishitan Japanese woodcut.
A Christian procession in Brazil, the country with the largest Catholic population in the world.
Trinity Sunday in Russia; the Russian Orthodox Church has experienced a great revival since the fall of communism.
The global distribution of Christians: Countries colored a darker shade have a higher proportion of Christians.
Pope Francis, the current leader of the Catholic Church.
St. George's Cathedral in Istanbul: It has been the seat of the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople whose leader is regarded as the primus inter pares in the Eastern Orthodox Church.
Holy Trinity Cathedral in Addis Ababa, the seat of the Ethiopian Orthodox.
A 6th-century Nestorian church, St. John the Arab, in the Assyrian village of Geramon in Hakkari, southeastern Turkey.
Saint Mary Church; an ancient Assyrian church located in the city of Urmia, Iran.
A 19th-century drawing of Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery receiving the Aaronic priesthood from John the Baptist. Latter Day Saints believe that the Priesthood ceased to exist after the death of the apostles and therefore needed to be restored.
Unitarian Church of Transylvania in Cluj-Napoca.
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A copy of the Summa Theologica by Thomas Aquinas, a famous Christian apologetic work.
Christians fleeing their homes in the Ottoman Empire, circa 1922. Many Christians were persecuted and/or killed during the Armenian genocide, Greek genocide, and Assyrian genocide.
Countries with 50% or more Christians are colored purple; countries with 10% to 50% Christians are colored pink
Nations with Christianity as their state religion are in blue
Distribution of Catholics
Distribution of Protestants
Distribution of Eastern Orthodox
Distribution of Oriental Orthodox
Distribution of other Christians
Links between interdenominational movements and other developments within Protestantism
Historical chart of the main Protestant branches
The Cenacle on Mount Zion in Jerusalem, claimed to be the location of the Last Supper and Pentecost.
A folio from Papyrus 46, an early-3rd-century collection of Pauline epistles

Abrahamic monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth.

- Christianity
An Eastern Christian icon depicting Emperor Constantine and the Fathers of the First Council of Nicaea (325) as holding the Niceno–Constantinopolitan Creed of 381.

308 related topics with Alpha

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Jesus healing the bleeding woman, Roman catacombs, 300–350

Early Christian art and architecture

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Jesus healing the bleeding woman, Roman catacombs, 300–350
The Brescia Casket, 4th-century ivory
Good Shepherd from the Catacomb of Priscilla, 250–300
Noah praying in the Ark, from a Roman catacomb
Santa Sabina, Rome, interior (5th century).
lnterior view of Santa Costanza, Rome
Nave of San Lorenzo fuori le mura, Rome
Detail - cast of the central sections of the Sarcophagus of Junius Bassus, with Traditio Legis and Jesus entering Jerusalem.
Gold glass from the catacombs, with Saint Peter, Virgin Mary in orant pose, Saint Paul, 4th century
The Three Youths in the Fiery Furnace ({{Bibleref2c|Daniel|3:10–30|NIV|Daniel 3:10–30}}), catacomb of Priscilla{{sfn|Weitzmann|1979|p=no. 383}}
Moses striking the rock in the desert, a prototype of baptism{{sfn|Weitzmann|1979|p=424-425}}
3rd-century cover for catacomb burial, engraved with the Adoration of the Magi (cast shown)
Catacomb chamber with (from top): Orants, Jonah and the Whale, Moses striking the rock (left), Noah praying in the ark, Adoration of the Magi. 200–250
Exterior of the Basilica St. Sofia in Sofia, Bulgaria, 4th century CE
Exterior of the Rotunda St. George, Sofia, Bulgaria, 3rd-4th century CE

Early Christian art and architecture or Paleochristian art is the art produced by Christians or under Christian patronage from the earliest period of Christianity to, depending on the definition used, sometime between 260 and 525.

The oldest known icon of Christ Pantocrator at Saint Catherine's Monastery. The two different facial expressions on either side emphasize Christ's dual nature as both divine and human.

Hypostatic union

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The oldest known icon of Christ Pantocrator at Saint Catherine's Monastery. The two different facial expressions on either side emphasize Christ's dual nature as both divine and human.
Composites of the two sides of the face.

Hypostatic union (from the Greek: ὑπόστασις hypóstasis, "sediment, foundation, substance, subsistence") is a technical term in Christian theology employed in mainstream Christology to describe the union of Christ's humanity and divinity in one hypostasis, or individual existence.

Nativity scene depicted using Christmas lights

Christmas

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Annual festival commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ, observed primarily on December 25 as a religious and cultural celebration among billions of people around the world.

Annual festival commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ, observed primarily on December 25 as a religious and cultural celebration among billions of people around the world.

Nativity scene depicted using Christmas lights
Eastern Orthodox icon of the birth of Christ by Saint Andrei Rublev, 15th century
Nativity of Christ, medieval illustration from the Hortus deliciarum of Herrad of Landsberg (12th century)
Adoration of the Shepherds (1622) by Gerard van Honthorst depicts the nativity of Jesus
Mosaic in Mausoleum M in the pre-fourth-century necropolis under St Peter's Basilica in Rome, interpreted by some as Jesus represented as Christus Sol (Christ the Sun).
The Nativity, from a 14th-century Missal; a liturgical book containing texts and music necessary for the celebration of Mass throughout the year
The coronation of Charlemagne on Christmas of 800 helped promote the popularity of the holiday
The Examination and Tryal of Old Father Christmas, (1686), published after Christmas was reinstated as a holy day in England
Ebenezer Scrooge and the Ghost of Christmas Present. From Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol, 1843.
The Queen's Christmas tree at Windsor Castle, published in the Illustrated London News, 1848
A Norwegian Christmas, 1846 painting by Adolph Tidemand
The Christmas Visit. Postcard, c.1910
Christmas at the Annunciation Church in Nazareth, 1965
Dark brown – countries that do not recognize Christmas on December 25 or January 7 as a public holiday.
Light brown – countries that do not recognize Christmas as a public holiday, but the holiday is given observance.
Many Christians attend church services to celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ.
A typical Neapolitan presepe or presepio, or Nativity scene. Local crèches are renowned for their ornate decorations and symbolic figurines, often mirroring daily life.
The official White House Christmas tree for 1962, displayed in the Entrance Hall and presented by John F. Kennedy and his wife Jackie.
On Christmas, the Christ Candle in the center of the Advent wreath is traditionally lit in many church services.
Children in Oklahoma reenact a Nativity play
Christmas carolers in Jersey
Child singers in Bucharest, 1841
Christmas dinner setting
A 1907 Christmas card with Santa and some of his reindeer
Christmas gifts under a Christmas tree
Saint Nicholas, known as Sinterklaas in the Netherlands, is considered by many to be the original Santa Claus
Christmas decorations at the Galeries Lafayette department store in Paris, France. The Christmas season is the busiest trading period for retailers.
Christmas market in Jena, Germany
Each year (most notably 2000) money supply in US banks is increased for Christmas shopping
A 1931 edition of the Soviet magazine Bezbozhnik, published by the League of Militant Atheists, depicting an Orthodox Christian priest being forbidden to take home a tree for the celebration of Christmastide, which was banned under the Marxist–Leninist doctrine of state atheism.

A feast central to the Christian liturgical year, it is preceded by the season of Advent or the Nativity Fast and initiates the season of Christmastide, which historically in the West lasts twelve days and culminates on Twelfth Night.

Depiction of the Christian Holy Spirit as a dove, by Gian Lorenzo Bernini, in the apse of Saint Peter's Basilica

Holy Spirit

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Divine force, quality, and influence of God over the universe or over his creatures.

Divine force, quality, and influence of God over the universe or over his creatures.

Depiction of the Christian Holy Spirit as a dove, by Gian Lorenzo Bernini, in the apse of Saint Peter's Basilica
A depiction of the Trinity consisting of God the Holy Spirit along with God the Father and God the Son
Pentecost icon depicting the descent of the Holy Spirit upon the Apostles and Mary in the form of tongues of flame above their heads

In Nicene Christianity, the Holy Spirit is the third person of the Trinity.

Water is poured on the head of an infant held over the baptismal font of a Roman Catholic church

Infant baptism

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Practice of baptising infants or young children.

Practice of baptising infants or young children.

Water is poured on the head of an infant held over the baptismal font of a Roman Catholic church
Baptism by immersion in the Eastern Orthodox Church
(Sophia Cathedral, 2005).
Christening photograph showing the oil moment and Baptism in Greek Orthodox Church.
German reformer Philipp Melanchthon baptizing an infant
A baptistry in a Methodist church
Baptism of a Yazidi child in Lalish

Most Christians belong to denominations that practice infant baptism.

The vision of Peter, painted by Domenico Fetti.

Acts 11

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The vision of Peter, painted by Domenico Fetti.
Map of Antiochia (Antioch) in Roman and early Byzantine times

Acts 11 is the eleventh chapter of the Acts of the Apostles in the New Testament of the Christian Bible.

Messiah in Judaism

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Savior and liberator figure in Jewish eschatology, who is believed to be the future redeemer of the Jewish people.

Savior and liberator figure in Jewish eschatology, who is believed to be the future redeemer of the Jewish people.

Jewish messianism gave birth to Christianity, which started as a Second Temple period messianic Jewish sect.

Jews stop to pray Maariv (evening prayer) while at a Tel Aviv flea-market shop

Fixed prayer times

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Jews stop to pray Maariv (evening prayer) while at a Tel Aviv flea-market shop
A board with precalculated prayer times in a mosque. Stated in the local time, the Muslim prayer times differ by locations and change from day to day.

Fixed prayer times, praying at dedicated times during the day, are common practice in major world religions such as Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

Bride and groom outside a church in Amalfi, Italy

Christian views on marriage

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Bride and groom outside a church in Amalfi, Italy
Rembrandt's depiction of Samson's marriage feast
Sometimes used as a symbol for Christian marriage: Two gold wedding rings interlinked with the Greek letters chi (X) and rho (P)—the first two letters in the Greek word for "Christ" (see Labarum)
Saint Paul Writing His Epistles, 16th century.
Crowning during Holy Matrimony in the Syro-Malabar Catholic Church which is an Eastern Catholic Church and a part of the Saint Thomas Christian community in India.
Catholic couple at their Holy Matrimony or marriage. In the Latin Rite of the Catholic Church, during the celebration the priest imposes his liturgical stole upon the couple's hands, as a sign to confirm the marriage bond.
Arbëreshë Albanian couple during marriage in an Italo-Greek Catholic Church rite.
During the Warsaw Uprising (1944), a Polish couple, members of an Armia Krajowa resistance group, are married in a secret Catholic chapel in a street in Warsaw.
Wedding ceremony at First Baptist Church of Rivas, Baptist Convention of Nicaragua, 2011
The Wedding of Stephen Beckingham and Mary Cox by William Hogarth, c. 1729 (Metropolitan Museum of Art, N.Y.).
The Wedding of Nicholas II and Grand Duchess Alexandra Feodorovna, by Ilya Yefimovich Repin, 1894 (Russian State Museum, St. Petersburg).
Byzantine wedding ring, depicting Christ uniting the bride and groom, 7th century, nielloed gold (Musée du Louvre).
Orthodox Church prepared for a wedding (Hagia Sophia, Thessaloniki.)
A Celestial Marriage must be performed in an LDS temple.
Orthodox betrothal depicted by Vasily Vladimirovich Pukirev, 1862.

From the earliest days of the Christian faith, Christians have honored holy matrimony (as Christian marriages are referred to) as a divinely blessed, lifelong, monogamous union, between a man and a woman.

Christian population growth

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Population growth of the global Christian community.

Population growth of the global Christian community.

According to the World Christian Encyclopedia, approximately 2.7 million convert to Christianity annually from another religion; World Christian Encyclopedia also stated that Christianity ranks in first place in net gains through religious conversion.