A report on Christianity

An Eastern Christian icon depicting Emperor Constantine and the Fathers of the First Council of Nicaea (325) as holding the Niceno–Constantinopolitan Creed of 381.
Various depictions of Jesus
Crucifixion, representing the death of Jesus on the Cross, painting by Diego Velázquez, c. 1632.
The Law and the Gospel by Lucas Cranach the Elder (1529); Moses and Elijah point the sinner to Jesus for salvation.
The Trinity is the belief that God is one God in three persons: the Father, the Son (Jesus), and the Holy Spirit.
Midnight Mass at a Catholic parish church in Woodside, New York City, U.S.
Show on the life of Jesus at Igreja da Cidade in São José dos Campos, affiliated to the Brazilian Baptist Convention.
An early circular ichthys symbol, created by combining the Greek letters ΙΧΘΥΣ into a wheel, Ephesus, Asia Minor.
The Bible is the sacred book in Christianity.
St. Peter's Basilica, Vatican City, the largest church in the world and a symbol of the Catholic Church.
The 7th-century Khor Virap monastery in the shadow of Mount Ararat; Armenia was the first state to adopt Christianity as the state religion, in AD 301.
The Monastery of St. Matthew, located atop Mount Alfaf in northern Iraq, is recognized as one of the oldest Christian monasteries in existence.
Kadisha Valley, Lebanon, home to some of the earliest Christian monasteries in the world.
Christendom by A.D. 600 after its spread to Africa and Europe from the Middle East.
An example of Byzantine pictorial art, the Deësis mosaic at the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople.
Pope Urban II at the Council of Clermont, where he preached the First Crusade. Illustration by Jean Colombe from a copy of the Passages d'outremer, c. 1490.
Martin Luther initiated the Reformation with his Ninety-five Theses in 1517.
Michelangelo's 1498–99 Pietà in St. Peter's Basilica; the Catholic Church was among the patronages of the Renaissance.
A depiction of Madonna and Child in a 19th-century Kakure Kirishitan Japanese woodcut.
A Christian procession in Brazil, the country with the largest Catholic population in the world.
Trinity Sunday in Russia; the Russian Orthodox Church has experienced a great revival since the fall of communism.
The global distribution of Christians: Countries colored a darker shade have a higher proportion of Christians.
Pope Francis, the current leader of the Catholic Church.
St. George's Cathedral in Istanbul: It has been the seat of the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople whose leader is regarded as the primus inter pares in the Eastern Orthodox Church.
Holy Trinity Cathedral in Addis Ababa, the seat of the Ethiopian Orthodox.
A 6th-century Nestorian church, St. John the Arab, in the Assyrian village of Geramon in Hakkari, southeastern Turkey.
Saint Mary Church; an ancient Assyrian church located in the city of Urmia, Iran.
A 19th-century drawing of Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery receiving the Aaronic priesthood from John the Baptist. Latter Day Saints believe that the Priesthood ceased to exist after the death of the apostles and therefore needed to be restored.
Unitarian Church of Transylvania in Cluj-Napoca.
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A copy of the Summa Theologica by Thomas Aquinas, a famous Christian apologetic work.
Christians fleeing their homes in the Ottoman Empire, circa 1922. Many Christians were persecuted and/or killed during the Armenian genocide, Greek genocide, and Assyrian genocide.
Countries with 50% or more Christians are colored purple; countries with 10% to 50% Christians are colored pink
Nations with Christianity as their state religion are in blue
Distribution of Catholics
Distribution of Protestants
Distribution of Eastern Orthodox
Distribution of Oriental Orthodox
Distribution of other Christians
Links between interdenominational movements and other developments within Protestantism
Historical chart of the main Protestant branches
The Cenacle on Mount Zion in Jerusalem, claimed to be the location of the Last Supper and Pentecost.
A folio from Papyrus 46, an early-3rd-century collection of Pauline epistles

Abrahamic monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth.

- Christianity
An Eastern Christian icon depicting Emperor Constantine and the Fathers of the First Council of Nicaea (325) as holding the Niceno–Constantinopolitan Creed of 381.

308 related topics with Alpha

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Christian mortalism

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Christian mortalism is the Christian belief that the human soul is not naturally immortal and may include the belief that the soul is uncomprehending immediately after bodily death, a time known as the intermediate state.

Page from the Gospel of Judas

Gnosticism

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Collection of religious ideas and systems which coalesced in the late 1st century AD among Jewish and early Christian sects.

Collection of religious ideas and systems which coalesced in the late 1st century AD among Jewish and early Christian sects.

Page from the Gospel of Judas
Mandaean Beth Manda (Mashkhanna) in Nasiriyah, southern Iraq in 2016; place of worship for the only surviving Gnostic religion from antiquity.
A lion-faced deity found on a Gnostic gem in Bernard de Montfaucon's L'antiquité expliquée et représentée en figures may be a depiction of Yaldabaoth, the Demiurge; however, cf. Mithraic Zervan Akarana
Mandaeans in prayer during baptism.
Manicheanism priests writing at their desks, with panel inscription in Sogdian. Manuscript from Khocho, Tarim Basin.
In Sufism, Iblis rules the material world in a manner that resembles the Gnostic Demiurge.

According to Turner, Sethianism was influenced by Christianity and Middle Platonism, and originated in the second century as a fusion of a Jewish baptizing group of possibly priestly lineage, the so-called Barbeloites, named after Barbelo, the first emanation of the Highest God, and a group of Biblical exegetes, the Sethites, the "seed of Seth".

Breviary of Beatrice van Assendelft, 1485

Canonical hours

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Breviary of Beatrice van Assendelft, 1485
Traditionally, Christian monastics prayed the Divine Office in the quire of the church.
Benedictine monks singing Vespers
The Agpeya is a breviary used in Oriental Orthodox Christianity to pray the canonical hours at fixed prayer times during the day.
The Shehimo is a breviary used in Indian Orthodoxy and Syriac Orthodoxy to pray the canonical hours at fixed prayer times during the day while facing in the eastward direction.
For All The Saints breviary, used in the Lutheran Churches, in four volumes
The Anglican Rosary sitting atop The Anglican Breviary and the Book of Common Prayer
A Lukan Book of Hours (in purple) and The Book of Offices and Services (in red), both liturgical texts of The Order of Saint Luke, a Methodist religious order

In the practice of Christianity, canonical hours mark the divisions of the day in terms of fixed times of prayer at regular intervals.

Plan of Alexandria c. 30 BC

Alexandria

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Mediterranean port city in Egypt.

Mediterranean port city in Egypt.

Plan of Alexandria c. 30 BC
Alexander the Great
The Lighthouse of Alexandria on coins minted in Alexandria in the second century (1: reverse of a coin of Antoninus Pius, and 2: reverse of a coin of Commodus).
Alexandria in the late 18th century, by Luigi Mayer
Entry of General Bonaparte into Alexandria, oil on canvas, 365 x,, Versailles
The Battle of Abukir, by Antoine-Jean Gros 1806
Alexandria: bombardment by British naval forces
Map of the city in the 1780s, by Louis-François Cassas.
Macedonian Army, shown on the Alexander Sarcophagus.
Engraving by L. F. Cassas of the Canopic Street in Alexandria, Egypt made in 1784.
Satellite image of Alexandria and other cities show its surrounding coastal plain
Lake Mariout
Egypt – Obelisk, Alexandria. Brooklyn Museum Archives, Goodyear Archival Collection.
Roman Amphitheater
Roman Pompey's Pillar
Saint Mark's Coptic Orthodox Cathedral
Catacombs of Kom El Shoqafa
Side view of The Temple of Taposiris Magna.
Citadel of Qaitbay
Jewish girls during Bat Mitzva in Alexandria
Collège Saint Marc
Lycée Français d'Alexandrie
Borg El Arab International Airport
Alexandria port
Misr Railway Station
An Alexandria tram
The Bibliotheca Alexandrina
Alexandria Stadium
The Italian consulate in Saad Zaghloul Square
Shalalat Gardens
Montaza Garden
Alexandria Art Centre
Alexandria Opera House
Fawzia Fahmy Palace
Alexander the Great's statue
Monument of the Unknown Navy Soldier
Montaza Palace
Al Qa'ed Ibrahim Mosque

The city was a major centre of early Christianity and was the centre of the Patriarchate of Alexandria, which was one of the major centres of Christianity in the Eastern Roman Empire.

Armenia

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Landlocked country located in the Armenian Highlands of Western Asia.

Landlocked country located in the Armenian Highlands of Western Asia.

Historical Armenia, 150 BC
Armenian soldier of the Achaemenid army, circa 470 BC. Xerxes I tomb relief.
The pagan Garni Temple, probably built in the first century, is the only "Greco-Roman colonnaded building" in the post-Soviet states
The Etchmiadzin Cathedral, Armenia's Mother Church traditionally dated 303 AD, is considered the oldest cathedral in the world.
The Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia, 1198–1375.
In 1501–02, most of the Eastern Armenian territories including Yerevan were conquered by the emerging Safavid dynasty of Iran led by Shah Ismail I.
Capture of Erivan fortress by Russian troops in 1827 during the Russo-Persian War (1826–28) by Franz Roubaud.
Armenian genocide victims in 1915
The Government house of the First Republic of Armenia (1918–1920).
Advance of the 11th Red Army into the city of Yerevan.
The coat of arms of Soviet Armenia depicting Mount Ararat in the centre.
Armenians gather at Theater Square in central Yerevan to claim unification of Nagorno-Karabakh Autonomous Oblast with the Armenian SSR.
Armenian soldiers in 2008, during the ongoing and unresolved Nagorno-Karabakh conflict.
21 September 2011 parade in Yerevan, marking the 20th anniversary of Armenia's re-independence.
Armenia's mountainous and volcanic topography.
Köppen-Geiger climate classification map for Armenia.
Carbon dioxide emissions in metric tons per capita in Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Russia, Germany, Italy, USA in 2000–2012. World Bank data.
The National Assembly in Yerevan
U.S. Secretary Mike Pompeo with Armenian President Armen Sarkissian
Russian President Vladimir Putin shakes hands with Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan.
Russian President Dmitry Medvedev at Armenian Genocide memorial in Yerevan.
Armenian Air Force Su-25s during a military parade.
In April 2018, a quasi-authoritarian regime collapsed as a result of a nationwide protest movement in Armenia
Geghard monastery, Kotayk Province
A proportional representation of Armenia exports, 2019
Yerevan is the economic and cultural centre of Armenia.
Gross domestic expenditure on R&D (GERD)to GDP ratio for the Black Sea countries, 2001–2013. Source: UNESCO Science Report: towards 2030 (2015), Figure 12.3
GERD in the Black Sea region by sector of performance, 2005 and 2013. Source: UNESCO Science Report: towards 2030 (2015), Figure 12.5
Yerevan State University building
Population pyramid 2016
The Armenian population around the world
'''Historical and modern distribution of Armenians.
'''Settlement area of Armenians in early 20th century:
Armenian-language writing.
Portal to the Holy City at Echmiazin, the seat of the Catholicos
The 7th-century Khor Virap monastery in the shadow of Mount Ararat, the peak on which Noah's Ark is said to have landed during the biblical flood.
Traditional Armenian dance
The Vazgen Sargsyan Republican Stadium in Yerevan
The Armenia national football team in Dublin, Ireland
Chess Grandmaster Levon Aronian is a former FIDE No. 2 rated player and the fourth highest rated player in history.
Ancient Armenian Khachkars (cross-stones)
Queen Zabel's Return to the Palace, Vardges Sureniants (1909)
Armenian cuisine
Armenian wine

The Kingdom of Armenia reached its height under Tigranes the Great in the 1st century BC and in the year 301 became the first state in the world to adopt Christianity as its official religion.

(left to right)
George Carey, Archbishop of Canterbury (1991–2002); Jonathan Sacks, Chief Rabbi (UK); Mustafa Cerić, Grand Mufti of Bosnia; and Jim Wallis, Sojourners member at the 2009 World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

Clergy

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Clergy are formal leaders within established religions.

Clergy are formal leaders within established religions.

(left to right)
George Carey, Archbishop of Canterbury (1991–2002); Jonathan Sacks, Chief Rabbi (UK); Mustafa Cerić, Grand Mufti of Bosnia; and Jim Wallis, Sojourners member at the 2009 World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.
14th Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso in 2007
Bishop Maurício Andrade, primate of the Anglican Episcopal Church of Brazil, gives a crosier to Bishop Saulo Barros
Archbishop Jose S. Palma with his assistant ministers during Pontifical High Mass
Archbishop Karl-Josef Rauber, Cardinal Godfried Danneels, Bishop Roger Vangheluwe and Bishop Jozef De Kesel
Orthodox Christian clergy: bishop (right, at altar), priest (left), and two deacons (in gold)
Ethiopian Orthodox clergy lead a procession in celebration of Saint Michael
Lutheran pastor confirming the youth of his congregation
The Reverend Hans G. Ridderstedt (1919-2007), Assistant Vicar at Stockholm Cathedral
A Sunni jurist (mufti) delivering a sermon from a pulpit
Iranian Shi'a scholar and author Sheikh Ali Akbar Nahavandi.
Rabbi Moshe Feinstein, a leading Rabbinical authority for Orthodox Jewry
Regina Jonas, the world's first female rabbi, ordained in 1935, killed in the Holocaust in 1944.
Sir George Fleming, 2nd Baronet, British churchman.
Charles Wesley Leffingwell, Episcopal priest

In Christianity, the specific names and roles of the clergy vary by denomination and there is a wide range of formal and informal clergy positions, including deacons, elders, priests, bishops, preachers, pastors, presbyters, ministers, and the pope.

Samuel anoints David, Dura Europos, Syria, Date: 3rd century CE.

Messiah

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In Abrahamic religions, a messiah or messias (מָשִׁיחַ; μεσσίας,

In Abrahamic religions, a messiah or messias (מָשִׁיחַ; μεσσίας,

Samuel anoints David, Dura Europos, Syria, Date: 3rd century CE.
Chabad Halachic ruling declaring "every single Jew" had to believe in the imminent second coming of the deceased 7th Lubavitcher Rebbe as the Messiah
The Last Judgment, by Jean Cousin the Younger (c. late 16th century)
Timeline of Jesus in Islamic Eschatology
Mirza Ghulam Ahmad, founder of the Ahmadiyya Movement in Islam, considered by Ahmadis to be the Promised Messiah of the latter days

Originating from the concept in Judaism, the Messiah in Christianity is called the Christ—from Greek khristós (χριστός), translating the Hebrew word of the same meaning.

Walking on water

Miracles of Jesus

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Walking on water
Jesus Descends from Heaven to Visit the Americas
Healing the mother of Peter's wife
Healing the deaf mute of Decapolis
Healing the blind at birth
Healing the Paralytic at Bethesda
The Blind Man of Bethsaida
The Blind man Bartimaeus in Jericho
Healing the Centurion's servant
Christ healing an infirm woman
The man with a withered hand
Cleansing a leper
Cleansing ten lepers
Healing a man with dropsy
Healing the bleeding woman
Healing the paralytic at Capernaum
Healing in Gennesaret
Two blind men
A boy possessed by a demon
The Canaanite woman's daughter
The Gerasenes demonic
At the Synagogue in Capernaum
Christ exorcising at sunset
Exorcism of the Gerasene demoniac
Exorcising a mute
Young Man from Nain
Daughter of Jairus
Raising of Lazarus
Marriage at Cana
Calming the storm
Transfiguration
Feeding the multitude
Draught of fishes
Cursing the fig tree
Coin in the fish's mouth

The miracles of Jesus are proposed miraculous deeds attributed to Jesus in Christian and Islamic texts.

Icon depicting Constantine I, accompanied by the bishops of the First Council of Nicaea (325), holding the Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed of 381

Nicene Creed

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First adopted at the First Council of Nicaea in 325.

First adopted at the First Council of Nicaea in 325.

Icon depicting Constantine I, accompanied by the bishops of the First Council of Nicaea (325), holding the Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed of 381
Oldest extant manuscript of the Nicene Creed, dated to the 6th Century
17th-century Russian icon illustrating the articles of the creed
Crucial formulation in the Greek of the creed shown in the icon above: homoousion tooi p(a)tri, Of one Being with the Father.

It is the only authoritative ecumenical statement of the Christian faith accepted by the Catholic Church (with the addition of the Filioque), the Eastern Orthodox Church, Oriental Orthodoxy, the Church of the East, much of Protestantism including the Anglican communion.

A 1760 printing of the 1662 Book of Common Prayer, printed by John Baskerville

Book of Common Prayer

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A 1760 printing of the 1662 Book of Common Prayer, printed by John Baskerville
Thomas Cranmer (1489–1556), editor and co-author of the first and second Books of Common Prayer
Cranmer's prayer book of 1552
Prayer book of 1559
Laud's abortive 1637 Prayer book.
Title page of the 1662 Prayer Book
A Collect for 5 November in the Book of Common Prayer published in London in 1689, referring to the Gunpowder Plot and the arrival of William III.
Edward Bouverie Pusey, a leader of the Oxford Movement.
A collection of various editions of the Book of Common Prayer, derivatives, and associated liturgical texts from within the Anglican Communion, Catholic Church, and Western Rite Orthodoxy.
Philippine Book of Common Prayer in the Church of Saint Mary, Sagada, Mountain Province, Philippines.
The diglotic English–Chinese Book of Common Prayer used by the Filipino–Chinese community of St Stephen's Pro-Cathedral in Manila, Philippines.
The 1979 Book of Common Prayer
Anglo-Catholic Anglican Service Book (1991), a traditional-language version of the Episcopal Book of Common Prayer
The Revised Prayer-Book of the Reformed Spanish Church, English translation of the 1889 revised Prayer Book used in the Spanish Reformed Episcopal Church.
The 1878 prayer book for the use of the Church of Ireland.
The first Book of Common Prayer in Welsh published in 1567

The Book of Common Prayer (BCP) is the name given to a number of related prayer books used in the Anglican Communion and by other Christian churches historically related to Anglicanism.