Christians

ChristianNasranibelieversChristian familyNassarahNazarenenon-ChristiansOther ChristianXian (abbreviation)believer
Christians are people who follow or adhere to Christianity, a monotheistic Abrahamic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus Christ.wikipedia
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Christianity

ChristianChristiansChristian faith
Christians are people who follow or adhere to Christianity, a monotheistic Abrahamic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus Christ.
Its adherents, known as Christians, believe that Jesus is the Christ, whose coming as the messiah was prophesied in the Hebrew Bible, called the Old Testament in Christianity, and chronicled in the New Testament.

Abrahamic religions

AbrahamicAbrahamic religionAbrahamic faiths
Christians are people who follow or adhere to Christianity, a monotheistic Abrahamic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus Christ.
The Abrahamic religions are monotheistic, with the term deriving from the patriarch Abraham (a major biblical figure from the Old Testament, who is recognized by Jews, Christians, Muslims, and others).

Christ (title)

ChristMessiahChristian Messiah
The words Christ and Christian derive from the Koine Greek title Christós, a translation of the Biblical Hebrew term mashiach .
Christians believe that Jesus is the messiah foretold in the Hebrew Bible and the Christian Old Testament.

Protestantism

ProtestantProtestantsProtestant church
About half of all Christians worldwide are Catholic, while more than a third are Protestant (37%).
Protestantism is the second-largest form of Christianity with collectively between 800 million and more than 900 million adherents worldwide or nearly 40% of all Christians.

Messiah

messianicmessianic figurePromised Messiah
In the Greek Septuagint, christos was used to translate the Hebrew מָשִׁיחַ (Mašíaḥ, messiah), meaning "[one who is] anointed."
Christ became the accepted Christian designation and title of Jesus of Nazareth, because Christians believe that the messianic prophecies in the Old Testament were fulfilled in his mission, death, and resurrection.

Jesus

Jesus ChristChristJesus of Nazareth
Christians are people who follow or adhere to Christianity, a monotheistic Abrahamic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus Christ.
Most Christians believe he is the incarnation of God the Son and the awaited Messiah (the Christ) in the Old Testament.

List of Christian synonyms

term for Christians
Another term for Christians which appears in the New Testament is "Nazarenes".
In Christianity, there are a number of other words used to refer to Christians.

Disciple (Christianity)

disciplesdisciplediscipleship
The first recorded use of the term (or its cognates in other languages) is in the New Testament, in Acts 11 after Barnabas brought Saul (Paul) to Antioch where they taught the disciples for about a year, the text says: "[...] the disciples were called Christians first in Antioch."
More specifically "messengers with extraordinary status, especially of God’s messenger, envoy" but predominately in the New Testament it is used of "a group of highly honored believers with a special function as God’s envoys" While a disciple is one who learns and apprentices under a teacher or rabbi, an apostle is one sent as a missionary to proclaim the good news and to establish new communities of believers.

Nazarene (title)

NazareneNazarenesNotzri
Another term for Christians which appears in the New Testament is "Nazarenes".
In the Book of Acts, "Nazorean" is used to refer to a follower of Jesus, i.e. a Christian, rather than an inhabitant of a town.

Tacitus on Christ

TacitusTacitus on Jesusdescribed the persecution
The earliest occurrences of the term in non-Christian literature include Josephus, referring to "the tribe of Christians, so named from him;" Pliny the Younger in correspondence with Trajan; and Tacitus, writing near the end of the 1st century.
The passage is one of the earliest non-Christian references to the origins of Christianity, the execution of Christ described in the canonical gospels, and the presence and persecution of Christians in 1st-century Rome.

Epistulae (Pliny)

EpistulaeLettersEpistles
The earliest occurrences of the term in non-Christian literature include Josephus, referring to "the tribe of Christians, so named from him;" Pliny the Younger in correspondence with Trajan; and Tacitus, writing near the end of the 1st century.
Especially noteworthy among the letters are two in which he describes the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in August 79 during which his uncle Pliny the Elder died (Epistulae VI.16, VI.20), and one in which he asks the Emperor for instructions regarding official policy concerning Christians (Epistulae X.96).

Great Fire of Rome

Fire of RomeGreat Fire of 64great fire
In the Annals he relates that "by vulgar appellation [they were] commonly called Christians" and identifies Christians as Nero's scapegoats for the Great Fire of Rome.
According to Tacitus and later Christian tradition, Emperor Nero blamed the devastation on the Christian community in the city, initiating the empire's first persecution against the Christians.

Jesus in Christianity

JesusJesus ChristChrist
Michael Martin evaluated three historical Christian creeds (the Apostles' Creed, the Nicene Creed and the Athanasian Creed) to establish a set of basic Christian assumptions which include belief in theism, the historicity of Jesus, the Incarnation, salvation through faith in Jesus, and Jesus as an ethical role model.
Christians believe that through his crucifixion and subsequent resurrection, God offered humans salvation and eternal life.

Nazareth

Nazareth, IsraelNatzrátNatzrat
While around 331 AD Eusebius records that Christ was called a Nazoraean from the name Nazareth, and that in earlier centuries "Christians" were once called "Nazarenes". In Arabic-speaking cultures, two words are commonly used for Christians: Naṣrānī, plural Naṣārā is generally understood to be derived from Nazareth through the Syriac (Aramaic); Masīḥī means followers of the Messiah.
Nasrani is used in the Quran for Christians, and in Modern Standard Arabic may refer more widely to Western people.

Christian fundamentalism

fundamentalistfundamentalist ChristianChristian fundamentalist
Most Baptists and fundamentalists (Christian Fundamentalism), for example, would not acknowledge Mormonism or Christian Science as Christian.
Such Christians prefer to use the term fundamental, as opposed to fundamentalist (e.g., Independent Fundamental Baptist and Independent Fundamental Churches of America).

Kirishitan

ChristianChristiansJapanese Christian
In Japan, the term kirishitan (written in Edo period documents 吉利支丹, 切支丹, and in modern Japanese histories as キリシタン), from Portuguese cristão, referred to Roman Catholics in the 16th and 17th centuries before the religion was banned by the Tokugawa shogunate.
Kristang), referred to Roman Catholic Christians in Japanese and is used in Japanese texts as a historiographic term for Roman Catholics in Japan in the 16th and 17th centuries.

Kristang people

KristangPortugueseSerani
In the past, the Malays used to call the Portuguese Serani from the Arabic Nasrani, but the term now refers to the modern Kristang creoles of Malaysia.
In the early years, the Malays called the Portuguese Serani (a Malay contraction of the Arabic Nasrani, meaning followers of Jesus the Nazarene).

Christian population growth

Christianity is growing
High birth rates and conversion were cited as the reason for Christian population growth.
According to a 2011 Pew Research Center survey, there were 2.19 billion Christians around the world in 2010, more than three times as many as the 600 million recorded in 1910.

1 Peter 4

1 Peter 4:16
The third and final New Testament reference to the term is in 1 Peter 4, which exhorts believers: "Yet if [any man suffer] as a Christian, let him not be ashamed; but let him glorify God on this behalf."

Middle East

Middle Easternthe Middle EastMiddle-East
Today, about 37% of all Christians live in the Americas, about 26% live in Europe, 24% live in sub-Saharan Africa, about 13% live in Asia and the Pacific, and 1% live in the Middle East and North Africa.
In Iran, many religious minorities such as Christians, Baha'is and Zoroastrians have left since the Islamic Revolution of 1979.

Syriac language

SyriacClassical SyriacSyriac-Aramaic
In Arabic-speaking cultures, two words are commonly used for Christians: Naṣrānī, plural Naṣārā is generally understood to be derived from Nazareth through the Syriac (Aramaic); Masīḥī means followers of the Messiah.
Primarily a Christian medium of expression, Syriac had a fundamental cultural and literary influence on the development of Arabic, which largely replaced it towards the 14th century.

Messianic Judaism

Messianic JewsMessianic JewishMessianic
Adherents of Messianic Judaism are referred to in modern Hebrew as יְהוּדִים מְשִׁיחִיִּים (Yehudim Meshihi'im—"Messianic Jews").
The Messianic Seal of Jerusalem is a symbol for Messianic Judaism and Christians.

Acts 26

Acts 26:2826
The second mention of the term follows in Acts 26, where Herod Agrippa II replied to Paul the Apostle, "Then Agrippa said unto Paul, Almost thou persuadest me to be a Christian."
*"Christian" (, Christianon, nominative: Christianos): This is the third mention of the term in the New Testament—the first use in Antioch (Acts 11:26) and last mention by Peter (1 Peter 4:16)—where all three usages are considered to reflect a derisive element referring to the followers of Christ who did not acknowledge the emperor of Rome.

Europe

EuropeanEUEuropean continent
Today, about 37% of all Christians live in the Americas, about 26% live in Europe, 24% live in sub-Saharan Africa, about 13% live in Asia and the Pacific, and 1% live in the Middle East and North Africa.
The largest religion in Europe is Christianity, with 76.2% of Europeans considering themselves Christians, including Catholic, Eastern Orthodox and various Protestant denominations.

Josephus on Jesus

Testimonium FlavianumJosephusJames the brother of Jesus
The earliest occurrences of the term in non-Christian literature include Josephus, referring to "the tribe of Christians, so named from him;" Pliny the Younger in correspondence with Trajan; and Tacitus, writing near the end of the 1st century.
Richard Carrier has proposed that Origen actually had in mind a passage from the work [[wikisource:Ante-Nicene Fathers/Volume VIII/Remains of the Second and Third Centuries/Hegesippus/Acts of the Church/Fragment 1|Commentaries on the Acts of the Church]], written by the Christian chronicler Hegesippus in the late second century.