Christopher Memminger

Christopher G. MemmingerChristopher Gustavus MemmingerC. G. MemmingerThe Book of Nullification
Christopher Gustavus Memminger (born Christoph Gustav Memminger; January 9, 1803 – March 7, 1888) was a German-born American politician and one of the founding fathers of the Confederate States.wikipedia
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Confederate States Secretary of the Treasury

Secretary of the TreasuryConfederate Secretary of the TreasuryConfederate States of America Secretary of the Treasury
As the first Confederate States Secretary of the Treasury, Memminger was the main author of the economic policies of the Jefferson Davis administration.

Provisional Constitution of the Confederate States

Provisional ConstitutionProvisional Confederate States ConstitutionConstitution for the Provisional Government of the Confederate States
He was the principal author of the Provisional Constitution (1861), as well as the founder of the nation's financial system.
On February 5, Christopher Memminger proposed a committee of thirteen be created for the purpose of drafting a provisional constitution in order to grant congressional power to the convention.

Jefferson Davis

Jeff DavisDavisJefferson Finis Davis
As the first Confederate States Secretary of the Treasury, Memminger was the main author of the economic policies of the Jefferson Davis administration.
Robert Toombs of Georgia was the first Secretary of State and Christopher Memminger of South Carolina became Secretary of the Treasury.

Confederate States of America

ConfederateConfederacyConfederate States
Christopher Gustavus Memminger (born Christoph Gustav Memminger; January 9, 1803 – March 7, 1888) was a German-born American politician and one of the founding fathers of the Confederate States.

Declaration of the Immediate Causes Which Induce and Justify the Secession of South Carolina from the Federal Union

Declaration of South Carolina secededDeclaration of Declaration of SecessionDeclaration of ordinance of secession
When South Carolina seceded from the United States in 1860, Memminger was asked to write the [[Declaration of the Immediate Causes Which Induce and Justify the Secession of South Carolina from the Federal Union]] which outlined the reasons for secession.
The declaration is a product of a convention organized by the state's government in the month following the election of Abraham Lincoln as U.S. President, where it was drafted in a committee headed by Christopher Memminger.

Confederate States dollar

Confederate moneyConfederate currencyConfederate dollar
Memminger was featured on the Confederate $5.00 bill.
Some of the people featured on banknotes include Andrew Jackson, John C. Calhoun, Christopher Memminger, Robert M. T. Hunter, Alexander H. Stephens, Jefferson Davis, Judah P. Benjamin, Clement Clay, George W. Randolph, and Lucy Holcombe Pickens, the wife of the Governor of South Carolina.

Provisional Congress of the Confederate States

Provisional Confederate CongressConfederate Provisional CongressProvisional Confederate States Congress
When other states also seceded, he was selected as a South Carolina delegate to the Provisional Congress of the Confederate States, and was the chairman of the committee which drafted the Provisional Constitution of the Confederate States.

George Trenholm

George Alfred TrenholmGeorge A. TrenholmTrenholm
Memminger resigned his post as Secretary of the Treasury on July 1, 1864 and was replaced by fellow South Carolinian G. A. Trenholm.
Confederate Treasury Secretary Christopher Memminger, a fellow Charlestonian and friend, used Trenholm as an unofficial adviser for almost four years.

Electorate of Württemberg

WürttembergElector of WürttembergDuke of Württemberg
Memminger was born on January 9, 1803, in Vaihingen, Württemberg (present-day Stuttgart-Vaihingen, Germany).

Stuttgart

Stuttgart, GermanyStuttgart, West GermanyVaihingen
Memminger was born on January 9, 1803, in Vaihingen, Württemberg (present-day Stuttgart-Vaihingen, Germany).

Germany

GermanGERFederal Republic of Germany
Memminger was born on January 9, 1803, in Vaihingen, Württemberg (present-day Stuttgart-Vaihingen, Germany).

Officer (armed forces)

officercommissionedofficers
His father, Gottfried Memminger, was an officer who died a month after his son's birth.

Birth name

néenee
His mother, Eberhardina (née Kohler) Memminger, immigrated to Charleston, South Carolina, but died of yellow fever in 1807.

Charleston, South Carolina

CharlestonCharleston, SCCharles Town
His mother, Eberhardina (née Kohler) Memminger, immigrated to Charleston, South Carolina, but died of yellow fever in 1807.

Yellow fever

yellow fever virusyellow-feveryellow plague
His mother, Eberhardina (née Kohler) Memminger, immigrated to Charleston, South Carolina, but died of yellow fever in 1807.

Thomas Bennett Jr.

Thomas Bennett, Jr.Thomas Bennett
His fortunes changed when, at the age of eleven, he was taken under the care of Thomas Bennett, a prominent lawyer and future Governor.

University of South Carolina

South CarolinaSouth Carolina CollegeUniversity of South Carolina at Columbia
He entered South Carolina College at the age of 12 and graduated second in his class at 16.

Nullification Crisis

nullificationNullification ConventionNullification Crisis of 1832
He was a leader of the opponents during the nullification excitement.

South Carolina

SCState of South CarolinaS.C.
He entered state politics and served in the South Carolina state legislature from 1836 to 1852 and 1854 to 1860, where for nearly twenty years he was the head of the finance committee. In 1859, after John Brown's raid, he was commissioned by South Carolina to consult with other delegates in Virginia as to the best method of warding off attacks of abolitionists.

John Brown (abolitionist)

John Brownabolitionist John BrownBrown
In 1859, after John Brown's raid, he was commissioned by South Carolina to consult with other delegates in Virginia as to the best method of warding off attacks of abolitionists.

Virginia

Commonwealth of VirginiaVAState of Virginia
In 1859, after John Brown's raid, he was commissioned by South Carolina to consult with other delegates in Virginia as to the best method of warding off attacks of abolitionists.

Abolitionism in the United States

abolitionistabolitionistsabolitionism
In 1859, after John Brown's raid, he was commissioned by South Carolina to consult with other delegates in Virginia as to the best method of warding off attacks of abolitionists.