Christopher Wray (English judge)

Christopher WraySir Christopher WrayChristoper WrayLord Chief Justice WrayWray CJ
Sir Christopher Wray (1524 – 7 May 1592) was an English judge and Chief Justice of the King's Bench.wikipedia
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Magdalene College, Cambridge

Magdalene CollegeMagdaleneMagdelene College
Wray was an alumnus of Buckingham College, Cambridge (refounded during his residence as Magdalene College).
Magdalene counted some of the greatest men in the realm among its benefactors, including Britain's premier noble the Duke of Norfolk, the Duke of Buckingham and Lord Chief Justice Christopher Wray.

Boroughbridge (UK Parliament constituency)

BoroughbridgeBoroughbridge (seat 1/2)Boroughbridge, Yorkshire
His parliamentary career began by his return (30 September 1553) for Boroughbridge, Yorkshire, which constituency he continued to represent until the death of Queen Mary of England in 1558.

Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales

Lord Chief JusticeChief Justice of the King's BenchLord Chief Justice of England
Sir Christopher Wray (1524 – 7 May 1592) was an English judge and Chief Justice of the King's Bench.

Ludgershall (UK Parliament constituency)

LudgershallLudgershall (seat 1/2) Ludgershall
In the parliament of 1571 Wray, then member for Ludgershall, Wiltshire, was chosen Speaker of the House of Commons.

Coverham Abbey

Abbot of CoverhamCoverham
Wray, the third son of Thomas Wray, seneschal in 1535 of Coverham Abbey, Yorkshire, by Joan, daughter of Robert Jackson of Gatenby, Bedale, in the same county, was born at Bedale in 1524.
Thomas Wraye, father of Sir Christopher Wray (Chief Justice of the King's Bench, 1574–1592), was the last seneschal of the abbey.

Great Grimsby (UK Parliament constituency)

Great GrimsbyGrimsbyGreat Grimsby (seat 1/2)
From 1563 to 1567 he sat for Great Grimsby, Lincolnshire.

Edmund Campion

CampionSaint Edmund CampionSt. Edmund Campion
The principal state trials over which he presided were those of the puritan John Stubbs or Stubbe, the Jesuit Edmund Campion, and his harbourer, William, lord Vaux (son of Thomas Vaux, 2nd Baron Vaux of Harrowdon), and the conspirators against the life of the queen, John Somerville and William Parry (d.
Lord Chief Justice Wray read the sentence: "You must go to the place from whence you came, there to remain until ye shall be drawn through the open city of London upon hurdles to the place of execution, and there be hanged and let down alive, and your privy parts cut off, and your entrails taken out and burnt in your sight; then your heads to be cut off and your bodies divided into four parts, to be disposed of at Her Majesty’s pleasure. And God have mercy on your souls."

John Somerville (conspirator)

John Somerville
The principal state trials over which he presided were those of the puritan John Stubbs or Stubbe, the Jesuit Edmund Campion, and his harbourer, William, lord Vaux (son of Thomas Vaux, 2nd Baron Vaux of Harrowdon), and the conspirators against the life of the queen, John Somerville and William Parry (d.
His father-in-law, Edward Arden was also arrested, tortured, tried and found guilty of treason by Christopher Wray.

George St Paul

Sir George St Paul, 1st BaronetSir George St PaulGeorge St. Poll
He married Frances, the daughter of Sir Christopher Wray, although they had no children.

Edmund Plowden

Sir Edmund PlowdenPlowdenPlowden's Commentaries
Wray's judgments and charges are recorded in the reports of Dyer, Plowden, Coke, and Croke, Cobbett's State Trials, and Nicolas's Life of Davison.
In 1565 he defended Edmund Bonner, with William Lovelace and Christopher Wray.

Glentworth, Lincolnshire

Glentworth
He died on 7 May 1592, and was buried in the church of St Michael, Glentworth, Lincolnshire, where, by the aid of grants from the profits of the mint, he had built for himself a noble mansion, which was long the seat of his posterity, and of which a portion was afterwards incorporated in the modern Glentworth Hall.
Glentworth is the site of Glentworth Hall, an Elizabethan country house built by Christopher Wray.

Edward Coke

Sir Edward CokeCokeLord Coke
Wray's judgments and charges are recorded in the reports of Dyer, Plowden, Coke, and Croke, Cobbett's State Trials, and Nicolas's Life of Davison. Coke praises his 'profound and judicial knowledge, accompanied with a ready and singular capacity, grave and sensible elocution, and continual and admirable patience.' No less eulogistic, though less weighty, are the encomiums of David Lloyd (State Worthies) and Fuller (Worthies of England).
After being called to the Bar in 1578 he began attending court cases at Westminster Hall, and soon drew the attention of court officials – many early reports have notes that he was told "by old Plowden" or "by Wray CJ".

William Bowes (ambassador)

William BowesSir William Bowes
Around the year 1600 William married Isabel Wray, daughter of the English judge Sir Christopher Wray.

Seneschal

sénéchalTruchsessgrand seneschal
Wray, the third son of Thomas Wray, seneschal in 1535 of Coverham Abbey, Yorkshire, by Joan, daughter of Robert Jackson of Gatenby, Bedale, in the same county, was born at Bedale in 1524.

Gatenby

Wray, the third son of Thomas Wray, seneschal in 1535 of Coverham Abbey, Yorkshire, by Joan, daughter of Robert Jackson of Gatenby, Bedale, in the same county, was born at Bedale in 1524.

Bedale

Bedale Golf Club
Wray, the third son of Thomas Wray, seneschal in 1535 of Coverham Abbey, Yorkshire, by Joan, daughter of Robert Jackson of Gatenby, Bedale, in the same county, was born at Bedale in 1524.

John Campbell, 1st Baron Campbell

Lord CampbellJohn CampbellSir John Campbell
The ancient doubts, revived by Lord Campbell as to his legitimacy, were removed by the publication in 1857 of the wills of his mother (by her second marriage wife of John Wycliffe, auditor of issues in the Richmond district) and his brother-in-law, Ralph Gower.

Buckingham College, Cambridge

Buckingham CollegeBuckingham HallCambridge, Buckingham College Priory
Wray was an alumnus of Buckingham College, Cambridge (refounded during his residence as Magdalene College).

Lincoln's Inn

Lincolns InnLincoln’s InnHonourable Society of Lincoln's Inn
Wray was admitted on 6 February 1544–45 as a student at Lincoln's Inn, where he was called to the bar in Hilary term 1549–50, was reader in autumn 1562, treasurer in 1565–6, and again reader in Lent 1567 in anticipation of his call to the degree of serjeant-at-law, which took place in the ensuing Easter term.

Serjeant-at-law

SLKing's SerjeantKS
Wray was admitted on 6 February 1544–45 as a student at Lincoln's Inn, where he was called to the bar in Hilary term 1549–50, was reader in autumn 1562, treasurer in 1565–6, and again reader in Lent 1567 in anticipation of his call to the degree of serjeant-at-law, which took place in the ensuing Easter term.

Mary I of England

Mary IQueen MaryMary
His parliamentary career began by his return (30 September 1553) for Boroughbridge, Yorkshire, which constituency he continued to represent until the death of Queen Mary of England in 1558.

Edmund Bonner

Bishop BonnerBonnerBishop Edmund Bonner
Like most of the gentlemen of the north, he was probably catholic at heart, but he evidently steered a wary course, for in the religious census of justices of the peace, compiled by episcopal authority in 1564, he is entered as ' indifferent.' In the following year he was assigned by the court of king's bench as counsel for Bonner in the proceedings on the Praemunire.

Praemunire

Præmunire ActPræmunireadvocating Papal supremacy
Like most of the gentlemen of the north, he was probably catholic at heart, but he evidently steered a wary course, for in the religious census of justices of the peace, compiled by episcopal authority in 1564, he is entered as ' indifferent.' In the following year he was assigned by the court of king's bench as counsel for Bonner in the proceedings on the Praemunire.