Section of a lung showing centrilobular emphysema, with enlarged airspaces in the centre of a lobule usually caused by smoking and a major feature of COPD
A woman smoking a cigarette, the most common method of tobacco smoking
Signs and symptoms of stages of COPD.
Aztec women are handed flowers and smoking tubes before eating at a banquet, Florentine Codex, 16th century.
Access to clean fuel and clean cooking facilities as of 2016.
Gentlemen Smoking and Playing Backgammon in an Interior by Dirck Hals, 1627
Normal lungs shown in upper diagram. Lungs damaged by COPD in lower diagram with an inset showing a cross-section of bronchioles blocked by mucus, and damaged alveoli.
Bonsack's cigarette rolling machine, as shown on U.S. patent 238,640
Micrograph showing emphysema (left – large empty spaces) and lung tissue with relative preserved alveoli (right).
A lengthy study conducted in order to establish the strong association necessary for legislative action (US cigarette consumption per person blue, male lung cancer rate brown)
A person blowing into a spirometer. Smaller handheld devices are available for office use.
Tendu Patta (Leaf) collection for Beedi industries
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease deaths per million persons in 2012
A graph that shows the efficiency of smoking as a way to absorb nicotine compared to other forms of intake.
Giovanni Battista Morgagni, who made one of the earliest recorded descriptions of emphysema in 1769
Sigmund Freud, whose doctor assisted his suicide because of oral cancer caused by smoking
alt=A black and white image, with a small white heart in the middle and large black lungs around it|Chest X-ray demonstrating severe COPD: Note the small heart size in comparison to the lungs.
Common adverse effects of tobacco smoking. The more common effects are in bold face.
A lateral chest X-ray of a person with emphysema: Note the barrel chest and flat diaphragm.
Skull with a burning cigarette, by Vincent van Gogh.
Lung bulla as seen on chest X-ray in a person with severe COPD
An enclosed smoking area in a Japanese train station. Notice the air vent on the roof.
A severe case of bullous emphysema
Axial CT image of the lung of a person with end-stage bullous emphysema
Very severe emphysema with lung cancer on the left (CT scan)

The most common cause of COPD is tobacco smoking.

- Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Tobacco use leads most commonly to diseases affecting the heart and lungs, with smoking being a major risk factor for heart attacks, strokes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), emphysema, and various types and subtypes of cancers (particularly lung cancer, cancers of the oropharynx, larynx, and mouth, esophageal and pancreatic cancer).

- Tobacco smoking
Section of a lung showing centrilobular emphysema, with enlarged airspaces in the centre of a lobule usually caused by smoking and a major feature of COPD

3 related topics

Alpha

Tobacco smoke in an Irish pub before a smoking ban came into effect on March 29, 2004

Tobacco smoke

Tobacco smoke in an Irish pub before a smoking ban came into effect on March 29, 2004

Tobacco smoke is a sooty aerosol produced by the incomplete combustion of tobacco during the smoking of cigarettes and other tobacco products.

Tobacco smoke, besides being an irritant and significant indoor air pollutant, is known to cause lung cancer, heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), emphysema, and other serious diseases in smokers (and in non-smokers as well).

A 21mg dose nicotine patch applied to the left arm

Smoking cessation

A 21mg dose nicotine patch applied to the left arm
Some health organizations manage text messaging services to help people avoid smoking
Percent increase of success for six months over unaided attempts for each type of quitting (chart from West & Shiffman based on Cochrane review data
Individuals who sustained damage to the insula were able to more easily abstain from smoking.
Survival from age 35 of non-smokers, cigarette smokers and ex-smokers who stopped smoking between 25 and 34 years old. The ex-smokers line follows closely the non-smokers line.
Smokers as a percentage of the population for the United States, the Netherlands, Norway, Japan, and Finland

Smoking cessation, usually called quitting smoking or stopping smoking, is the process of discontinuing tobacco smoking.

Tobacco use leads most commonly to diseases affecting the heart and lungs, with smoking being a major risk factor for heart attacks, strokes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), emphysema, and various types and subtypes of cancers (particularly lung cancer, cancers of the oropharynx, larynx, and mouth, esophageal and pancreatic cancer).

Advanced centrilobular emphysema showing total lobule involvement on the left side

Emphysema

Lower respiratory tract disease, characterised by air-filled spaces in the lungs, that can vary in size and may be very large.

Lower respiratory tract disease, characterised by air-filled spaces in the lungs, that can vary in size and may be very large.

Advanced centrilobular emphysema showing total lobule involvement on the left side
Diagram of aveoli with emphysema
CT scan of bullous emphysema
Stained lung tissue from end-stage emphysema.
A large bulla and a smaller bleb illustrated
Giovanni Battista Morgagni, who recorded one of the earliest descriptions of emphysema in 1769

Emphysema usually affects the middle aged or older population because it takes time to develop with the effects of tobacco smoking, and other risk factors.

When associated with significant airflow limitation, emphysema is a major subtype of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a progressive lung disease characterized by long-term breathing problems and poor airflow.