A report on Chuck Yeager

Brigadier General Chuck Yeager
Yeager as a young captain, c. 1944
P-51D-20NA, Glamorous Glen III, is the aircraft in which Yeager achieved most of his aerial victories.
Yeager in front of the Bell X-1, which, as with all of the aircraft assigned to him, he named Glamorous Glennis (or some variation thereof), after his wife.
Yeager in the Bell X-1 cockpit
Yeager in 1950
Yeager, as Commandant of the USAF Aerospace Research Pilot School with a model of the North American X-15, 1959
Brigadier General Yeager in 2000
Special Congressional Silver Medal awarded to Yeager in 1976
Old emblem of the General Chuck Yeager Cadet Squadron (formerly of the Civil Air Patrol)
Yeager in 2012, in front of a new Glamorous Glennis III F-15D Eagle

United States Air Force officer, flying ace, and record-setting test pilot who in 1947 became the first pilot in history confirmed to have exceeded the speed of sound in level flight.

- Chuck Yeager
Brigadier General Chuck Yeager

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An F-35 Lightning II of the 461st Flight Test Squadron landing at Edwards Air Force Base

Edwards Air Force Base

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United States Air Force installation in California.

United States Air Force installation in California.

An F-35 Lightning II of the 461st Flight Test Squadron landing at Edwards Air Force Base
First production P-59A with a P-63 behind
Lockheed XP-80A "Gray Ghost", 1945
Chuck Yeager next to experimental aircraft Bell X-1 #1, Glamorous Glennis, 1947
Northrop YB-49 taking off for the first time on 21 October 1947
Captain Glen Edwards, namesake of the base, USAAF veteran and test pilot. The base was renamed in Edwards' honor in 1949
North American X-15A (AF Ser. No. 56-6671) with test pilots, Edwards AFB, California. Number 6671 was extensively damaged during emergency landing at Edwards AFB on 9 November 1962 with John McKay at the controls. Later modified as X-15A-2; now on display at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force at Wright-Patterson AFB, OH.
McDonnell Douglas F-15A-1-MC Eagle (AF Ser. No. 71-0280) (also known as YF-15A, first F-15 manufactured) preparing to make its historic first flight on 27 July 1972 at Edwards AFB, CA with the 6512th Test Squadron. This airplane was later used for exploring the F-15's flight envelope, handling qualities and external stores carriage capabilities.
YF-16 and YF-17 in flight during their competitive fly-off, 1974. Over 4,000 production F-16s were built after the competition. The YF-17 was the basis for the highly successful United States Navy F/A-18 Hornet.
Lt. Col. John Stapp riding the rocket sled Gee Whiz
Space Shuttle Endeavour atop the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft taking off from Edwards AFB after the STS-126 mission, 9 December 2008. For a complete list of Space Shuttle landing locations, see: List of Space Shuttle missions.
Prototype YF-22 and YF-23 fighters, 1991
452d Flight Test Squadron Northrop Grumman Block 20 RQ-4B Global Hawk (05-2023) being serviced at Edwards AFB
Headquarters Building, Air Force Test Center, Edwards AFB
Aerial view of the new control tower with the old tower in the background
Headquarters, 412th Test Wing
Headquarters, USAF Test Pilot School
31st Test and Evaluation Squadron Lockheed Martin F-35A Lightning II 09-5007
AFOTEC Detachment 5 personnel in front of a RQ-4 Global Hawk
Northrop B-2A roll-out ceremony on 22 November 1988 at USAF Plant 42, Palmdale, California
Armstrong Flight Research Center fleet in 1997
Air Force Rocket Research Laboratory Edwards AFRL site
Satellite image of the main site, with Edwards Air Force Auxiliary Base South at the bottom right of the image and Rogers Dry Lake at the top right
Rogers Dry Lake with Edwards AFB and Auxiliary Base South in the bottom left and Auxiliary Base North at the top of the image
The Rogers Lake is not always dry. During the brief rainy season in the Mojave Desert, water fills the lake bed. The compass rose can be seen on the left.
The world's largest compass rose is painted on the lake bed beside NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center.

Notable occurrences at Edwards include Chuck Yeager's flight that broke the sound barrier in the Bell X-1, test flights of the North American X-15, the first landings of the Space Shuttle, and the 1986 around-the-world flight of the Rutan Voyager.

X-1 #46-062, nicknamed Glamorous Glennis

Bell X-1

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Rocket engine–powered aircraft, designated originally as the XS-1, and was a joint National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics–U.S. Army Air Forces–U.S. Air Force supersonic research project built by Bell Aircraft.

Rocket engine–powered aircraft, designated originally as the XS-1, and was a joint National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics–U.S. Army Air Forces–U.S. Air Force supersonic research project built by Bell Aircraft.

X-1 #46-062, nicknamed Glamorous Glennis
X-1 #46-062, nicknamed Glamorous Glennis
XLR-11 rocket engine
Chuck Yeager in front of the X-1 that he nicknamed the Glamorous Glennis.
A 1997 United States Postal Service stamp commemorates Bell X-1, the first plane to fly faster than the speed of sound
X-1A in flight
X-1A
X-1B at the National Museum of the United States Air Force.
Bell X-1-3, aircraft #46-064, being mated to the B-50 mothership for a captive flight test on 9 November 1951. While being de-fueled after this flight it exploded, destroying itself and the B-50, and seriously burning Joe Cannon. X-1-3 had completed only a single glide-flight on 20 July.
The X-1E, christened Little Joe, with pilot Joe Walker.
X-1-1 #46-062 Glamorous Glennis at the National Air and Space Museum. Its color is International Orange
Bell X-1 orthographic diagram
X-1E orthographic diagram

The X-1, piloted by Chuck Yeager, was the first manned airplane to exceed the speed of sound in level flight and was the first of the X-planes, a series of American experimental rocket planes (and non-rocket planes) designed for testing new technologies.

Theatrical release poster

The Right Stuff (film)

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1983 American epic historical drama film written and directed by Philip Kaufman and based on the 1979 book of the same name by Tom Wolfe.

1983 American epic historical drama film written and directed by Philip Kaufman and based on the 1979 book of the same name by Tom Wolfe.

Theatrical release poster
A replica of the Glamorous Glennis which was used in filming The Right Stuff. Now on display at the Cosmosphere in Hutchinson, Kansas. The same museum has the flown Liberty Bell 7 spacecraft on display.

After another pilot, Slick Goodlin, demands $150,000 to attempt to break the sound barrier, war hero Captain Chuck Yeager receives the chance to fly the X-1.

P-51D of 375th Fighter Squadron, with underwing drop tanks

North American P-51 Mustang

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American long-range, single-seat fighter and fighter-bomber used during World War II and the Korean War, among other conflicts.

American long-range, single-seat fighter and fighter-bomber used during World War II and the Korean War, among other conflicts.

P-51D of 375th Fighter Squadron, with underwing drop tanks
P-51D of 375th Fighter Squadron, with underwing drop tanks
North American NA-73X, with a short carburetor air intake scoop and the frameless, rounded windshield: On the production Mustang Mk Is, the frameless windshield was replaced with a three-piece unit that incorporated a bullet-resistant windshield.
P-51D on the Inglewood assembly line
XP-51 41-039, one of two Mustang Mk I aircraft handed over to the USAAC for testing
A Royal Air Force North American Mustang Mk III (FX908) on the ground at Hucknall
P-51 Mustangs of the 375th Fighter Squadron, Eighth Air Force mid-1944
Pilots of the all-Black American 332nd Fighter Group (the Tuskegee Airmen) at Ramitelli, Italy: From left, Lt. Dempsey W. Morgran, Lt. Carroll S. Woods, Lt. Robert H. Nelron, Jr., Capt. Andrew D. Turner, and Lt. Clarence D. Lester
A USAAF armorer of the 100th Fighter Squadron, 332nd Fighter Group, 15th U.S. Air Force checks ammunition belts of the .50 caliber (12.7 mm) Browning machine guns in the wings of a North American P-51B Mustang in Italy, circa September 1944
P-51D 44-14888 of the 8th AF/357th FG/363rd FS, named Glamorous Glen III, is the aircraft in which Chuck Yeager achieved most of his 12.5 kills, including two Me 262s – shown here with twin single-use 108-gallon (409-l) drop tanks fitted. This aircraft was renamed "Melody's Answer" and crashed on Mar 2, 1945, from unknown causes at Haseloff, west of Treuenbrietzen, Germany.
Top-scoring Mustang ace of WWII, Major George Earl Preddy Jr. with 26.83 aerial victories and five aircraft destroyed on the ground (first three victories were achieved on P-47)
P-51D Mustang Detroit Miss of the 375th Fighter Squadron: Urban L. Drew flew this aircraft in the autumn 1944 and shot down six German aircraft, including two jet-powered Me 262s in a single mission.
A P-51 Mustang taking off from Iwo Jima.
USS Boxer (CV-21) loads 146 USAF F-51Ds at Alameda for the Korean theater, in July 1950.
An F-51 Mustang, laden with bombs and rockets, taxis through a puddle at an airbase in Korea.
West Virginia Air National Guard F-51D. Note: postwar "uncuffed" propeller unit.
P-51Ds of 82 Squadron RAAF in Bofu, Japan, as part of the British Commonwealth Occupation Force, in 1947
A Cavalier Mustang, formerly of the Bolivian Air Force, parked on a Canadian airfield
Lynn Garrison with RCAF 9281, 1956, during the 1969 Football War, returned to the U.S. by Jerry Janes and flown as Cottonmouth
P-51 of the Republic of China Air Force, 1953
P-51D Mustang in Military Museum of the Chinese People's Revolution
Guatemalan Air Force P-51Ds at Guatemala La Aurora International
Indonesian Air Force P-51
A P-51D at the Israeli Air Force Museum: The marking beneath the cockpit notes its participation in the wire-cutting operation at the onset of the Suez Crisis.
Italian P-51D Mustang.
Netherlands North American P-51 Mustang
P-51D in 3 (Canterbury) Squadron TAF livery, performing at 2007 Wings over Wairarapa airshow
Philippine Air Force P-51D: The tailwheels were fixed in the extended position.
North American F-51D Mustang fighters of No. 2 Squadron of the South African Air Force in Korea, on 1 May 1951
The F-51D in ROKAF service
Swedish Air Force J 26 on display at Swedish Air Force Museum
A restored Swiss Air Force P-51D at the Flieger-Flab-Museum
Cavalier P-51 Mustang with tiptanks
Miss Helen, a P-51D in its wartime markings as flown by Capt. Raymond H. Littge of the 487 FS, 352 FG, on aerial display in 2007: It is the last original 352 FG P-51 known to exist.
The Rebel, a P-51D-25-NT, at the 2014 Reno Air Races
TP-51C "Betty Jane" dual control Warbird of the Collings Foundation appears at airshows around the United States
3-view drawing of P-51D Mustang
The restored P-51C Mustang associated with the Tuskegee Airmen now flown by Red Tail Project as described in Red Tail Reborn
Nose of P-51 Gunfighter
Wing and guns

Lt. Chuck Yeager of the 357th Fighter Group was one of the first American pilots to shoot down an Me 262, which he caught during its landing approach.

357th Fighter Group

357th Fighter Group

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Air combat unit of the United States Army Air Forces during the Second World War.

Air combat unit of the United States Army Air Forces during the Second World War.

357th Fighter Group
P-39Q Airacobra 42-19447 Saga Boy II of Lt.Col. Edwin S. Chickering, July 1943.
North American P-51K Mustang Muddy, 44-11697, G4-K (foreground, assigned to 2nd Lt. James Gasser) and P-51D Butch Baby 44-14798, G4-V (background, 2nd Lt. Julian .H. Bertram). G4-V was formerly Master Mike, the mount of Major Joe Broadhead, 362 FS CO. Taken at RAF Steeple Morden in April 1945
P-51B 43-12123 C5-Z Bat Cave, assigned to Capt. Charles D. Sumner, 364 FS, credited with 4.5 kills
P-51D 44-14888 B6-Y Glamorous Glen III, personally assigned aircraft of Capt. Chuck Yeager, 363rd FS, whom he named after his wife. After Yeager was reassigned, this aircraft was renamed "Melody's Answer" and was lost 2 March 1945.
Capt. Clarence E. "Bud" Anderson, 363d FS. Capt Anderson flew three P-51s (2 B and 1 D) which he named "Old Crow" (B6-S), this aircraft being P-51D 44-14450.
Old Crow, the aircraft of Capt. Clarence E. "Bud" Anderson, 363rd FS, with an F-15D at RAF Lakenheath in July 2001

Stetson, relinquished command, and sources who were present at the time are contradictory about a possible connection: Olmsted states that Stetson was sent overseas to command a fighter group; Chuck Yeager said he was relieved of command for the high death rate in training.

Armstrong in 1969

Neil Armstrong

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American astronaut and aeronautical engineer, and the first person to walk on the Moon.

American astronaut and aeronautical engineer, and the first person to walk on the Moon.

Armstrong in 1969
Ensign Neil Armstrong on May 23, 1952
F9F-2 Panthers over Korea, with Armstrong piloting S-116 (left)
Armstrong, 26, as a test pilot at the NACA High-Speed Flight Station at Edwards AFB, California
Armstrong and X-15-1 after a research flight in 1960
Armstrong in an early Gemini space suit
Armstrong, 35, suiting up for Gemini 8 in March 1966
Recovery of Gemini 8 from the western Pacific Ocean; Armstrong sitting to the right
Armstrong descends to the ground on a parachute after ejecting from Lunar Landing Research Vehicle 1.
The Apollo 11 crew: Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Buzz Aldrin.
Armstrong in the lunar module after the completion of the EVA
Armstrong on the Moon
The Apollo 11 crew and President Nixon during the post-mission quarantine period
New York City ticker tape parade, August 13, 1969
Valentina Tereshkova, the first woman in space, presenting a badge to Neil Armstrong, Star City, USSR, June 1970
Michael Collins, President George W. Bush, Neil Armstrong, and Buzz Aldrin during celebrations of the 35th anniversary of the Apollo 11 flight, July 21, 2004
Armstrong in 1999
Armstrong speaking in February 2012, six months before his death, on the 50th anniversary of John Glenn's first spaceflight
Photograph of Armstrong as a boy at his family memorial service in Indian Hill, Ohio, near Cincinnati, on August 31, 2012
Armstrong's burial at sea on September 14, 2012
Armstrong gives an acceptance speech after being inducted into the Naval Aviation Hall of Honor at the National Naval Aviation Museum in Pensacola, Florida
President Barack Obama poses with the Apollo 11 crew on the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 lunar landing, July 20, 2009: Buzz Aldrin, Michael Collins, and Neil Armstrong
Ohio's 50 State quarter depicts Armstrong and the Wright brothers' Wright Flyer III

Those who flew for the Air Force tended to have a different opinion, especially people like Chuck Yeager and Pete Knight, who did not have engineering degrees.

U.S. Navy F/A-18 transonic pushing into the sound barrier. The supersonic white cloud is formed by decreased air pressure and temperature around the tail of the aircraft (see Prandtl–Glauert singularity).

Sound barrier

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[[Image:Sound barrier chart.svg|thumb|1. Subsonic

[[Image:Sound barrier chart.svg|thumb|1. Subsonic

U.S. Navy F/A-18 transonic pushing into the sound barrier. The supersonic white cloud is formed by decreased air pressure and temperature around the tail of the aircraft (see Prandtl–Glauert singularity).
A Spitfire PR Mk XI (PL965) of the type used in the 1944 RAE Farnborough dive tests during which a highest Mach number of 0.92 was obtained
The prototype Miles M.52 turbojet powered aircraft, designed to achieve supersonic level flight
One of the Vickers models undergoing supersonic wind-tunnel testing at the Royal Aircraft Establishment (RAE) around 1946
Chuck Yeager in front of the Bell X-1, the first aircraft to break the sound barrier in level flight

In 1947, American test pilot Chuck Yeager demonstrated that safe flight at the speed of sound was achievable in purpose-designed aircraft, thereby breaking the barrier.

XS-1 Research Team. Jack Ridley is 2nd from right.

Jack Ridley (pilot)

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Aeronautical engineer, USAF test pilot and chief of the U.S. Air Force's Flight Test Engineering Laboratory.

Aeronautical engineer, USAF test pilot and chief of the U.S. Air Force's Flight Test Engineering Laboratory.

XS-1 Research Team. Jack Ridley is 2nd from right.

He was highly respected among fellow test pilots, most notably Chuck Yeager, for his engineering skills.

Collier Trophy

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Annual aviation award administered by the U.S. National Aeronautic Association , presented to those who have made "the greatest achievement in aeronautics or astronautics in America, with respect to improving the performance, efficiency, and safety of air or space vehicles, the value of which has been thoroughly demonstrated by actual use during the preceding year."

Annual aviation award administered by the U.S. National Aeronautic Association , presented to those who have made "the greatest achievement in aeronautics or astronautics in America, with respect to improving the performance, efficiency, and safety of air or space vehicles, the value of which has been thoroughly demonstrated by actual use during the preceding year."

Herbert Hoover presents the 1929 Collier Trophy to NACA Chairman Joseph Ames for the NACA cowling
1930 Collier Trophy for Pitcairn's autogyro
1926 Collier Trophy President Calvin Coolidge presented to Edward L. Hoffman for the modern freefall parachute
thumb|1927 Collier Trophy President Coolidge presented to Charles Lawrance for the air-cooled aircraft radial engine
1930 Collier Trophy recipient Harold Frederick Pitcairn for the autogyro
1933 Collier Trophy President Roosevelt congratulates Frank W. Caldwell of Hamilton Standard for the controllable-pitch propeller
1939 Collier Trophy President Roosevelt congratulates US airlines Dr. Walter Meredith Boothby, William Randolph Lovelace II, and Harry George Armstrong
1946 Collier Trophy President Truman congratulates Lewis A. Rodert for the thermal aircraft anti-icing
1952 Collier Trophy President Truman congratulates John Stack for the Langley transonic wind tunnel
1958 Collier Trophy with (L to R) Walter W. Irwin, Howard C. Johnson, US VP Nixon, Gerhard Neumann, Neil Burgess, Clarence Leonard "Kelly" Johnson
1966 Collier Trophy with James Smith McDonnell Jr. founder of McDonnell Aircraft Corporation for the F-4 Phantom and Project Gemini
1973 Collier Trophy VP Ford congratulates NASA Skylab Program Director William C. Schneider
2011 Collier Trophy presented to The Boeing Company for the 787 Dreamliner
2013 Collier Trophy presented to Northrop Grumman/U.S. Navy for the X-47B
2014 Collier Trophy presented to Gulfstream for the G650

1947 – Lawrence Bell, John Stack, Chuck Yeager shared the award for their work on the Bell X-1, the first aircraft to break the sound barrier.

AAF Shoulder Sleeve Insignia

United States Army Air Forces

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The major land-based aerial warfare service component of the United States Army and de facto aerial warfare service branch of the United States during and immediately after World War II (1941–1945).

The major land-based aerial warfare service component of the United States Army and de facto aerial warfare service branch of the United States during and immediately after World War II (1941–1945).

AAF Shoulder Sleeve Insignia
General of the Army Henry H. ("Hap") Arnold
USAAF recruitment poster
Tuskegee Airmen War bonds poster
1943 portrait of WAC air controller
AAF Training Command patch
USAAF recruiting poster
USAAF insignia from July 1943 to January 1947
B-17G Fortresses of the 306th Bomb Group
P-51 Mustang of 361st Fighter Group, 1944
Taylorcraft L-2
C-47 of the 438th Troop Carrier Group
USAAF AT-6Cs near Luke Field, 1943
UC-64 Norseman
General Carl A. Spaatz
Medal of Honor recipient Major Richard Bong in Officer's Service Dress
Awards ceremony at RAF Debden, April 1944, illustrating varying shades of olive drab and the M-1944 "Ike jacket". Light shade 33 on left, dark shade 51 on right. Trousers are shade 33, khaki shade 1, and drab shade 54. The three combinations at right are "pinks and greens".
At the AAF School of Air Evacuation at Bowman Field, Ky., student flight nurses learned how to handle patients with the aid of a mock-up fuselage of a Douglas C-47 transport.
Female service dress in OD shade 33 at Randolph Field, 1944
USAAF flight crew
First Air Force
Second Air Force
Third Air Force
Fourth Air Force
Fifth Air Force
Sixth Air Force
Seventh Air Force
Eighth Air Force
Ninth Air Force
Tenth Air Force
Eleventh Air Force
Twelfth Air Force
Thirteenth Air Force
Fourteenth Air Force
Fifteenth Air Force
Twentieth Air Force

Two fighter pilot beneficiaries of this change went on to become brigadier generals in the United States Air Force, James Robinson Risner and Charles E. Yeager.