Chumash people

ChumashChumash IndiansChumash-VenturañoChumash tribeChumash peoplesChumash IndianChumash Native Americans[[Chumash IndiansCanaliñoChumash (tribe)
The Chumash are a Native American people who historically inhabited the central and southern coastal regions of California, in portions of what is now San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Ventura and Los Angeles counties, extending from Morro Bay in the north to Malibu in the south.wikipedia
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Ventura County, California

Ventura CountyVenturaVentura Counties
The Chumash are a Native American people who historically inhabited the central and southern coastal regions of California, in portions of what is now San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Ventura and Los Angeles counties, extending from Morro Bay in the north to Malibu in the south.
Ventura County was historically inhabited by the Chumash people, who also settled much of Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo Counties, with their presence dating back 10,000-12,000 years.

Morro Bay, California

Morro BayMorro Bay Power PlantMoro Bay
The Chumash are a Native American people who historically inhabited the central and southern coastal regions of California, in portions of what is now San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Ventura and Los Angeles counties, extending from Morro Bay in the north to Malibu in the south.
The prehistory of Morro Bay relates to Chumash settlement, particularly near the mouth of Morro Creek.

Santa Barbara County, California

Santa Barbara CountySanta BarbaraSanta Barbara Counties
The Chumash are a Native American people who historically inhabited the central and southern coastal regions of California, in portions of what is now San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Ventura and Los Angeles counties, extending from Morro Bay in the north to Malibu in the south.
For thousands of years, the area was home to the Chumash tribe of Native Americans, complex hunter-gatherers who lived along the coast and in interior valleys leaving rock art in many locations, including Painted Cave.

California

CAState of CaliforniaCalifornia, USA
The Chumash are a Native American people who historically inhabited the central and southern coastal regions of California, in portions of what is now San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Ventura and Los Angeles counties, extending from Morro Bay in the north to Malibu in the south.
California groups also were diverse in their political organization with bands, tribes, villages, and on the resource-rich coasts, large chiefdoms, such as the Chumash, Pomo and Salinan.

Lompoc, California

LompocLompoc, CACalifornia
Modern place names with Chumash origins include Cayucos, Malibu, Nipomo, Lompoc, Ojai, Pismo Beach, Point Mugu, Port Hueneme, Piru, Lake Castaic, Saticoy, Simi Valley and Somis.
Before European settlers arrived, the area around Lompoc was inhabited by the Chumash people.

Malibu, California

MalibuMalibu, CAMalibu Beach
The Chumash are a Native American people who historically inhabited the central and southern coastal regions of California, in portions of what is now San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Ventura and Los Angeles counties, extending from Morro Bay in the north to Malibu in the south. Modern place names with Chumash origins include Cayucos, Malibu, Nipomo, Lompoc, Ojai, Pismo Beach, Point Mugu, Port Hueneme, Piru, Lake Castaic, Saticoy, Simi Valley and Somis.
Malibu is named for the Ventureño Chumash settlement of Humaliwo, which translates to "The Surf Sounds Loudly."

Nipomo, California

Nipomo
Modern place names with Chumash origins include Cayucos, Malibu, Nipomo, Lompoc, Ojai, Pismo Beach, Point Mugu, Port Hueneme, Piru, Lake Castaic, Saticoy, Simi Valley and Somis.
Nipumuʔ was the name of a Chumash tribal site located in the present-day area of Nipomo.

San Luis Obispo County, California

San Luis Obispo CountySan Luis ObispoSan Luis Obispo Counties
The Chumash are a Native American people who historically inhabited the central and southern coastal regions of California, in portions of what is now San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Ventura and Los Angeles counties, extending from Morro Bay in the north to Malibu in the south.
The prehistory of San Luis Obispo County is strongly influenced by the Chumash people.

Ojai, California

OjaiOjai ValleyOjai, CA
Modern place names with Chumash origins include Cayucos, Malibu, Nipomo, Lompoc, Ojai, Pismo Beach, Point Mugu, Port Hueneme, Piru, Lake Castaic, Saticoy, Simi Valley and Somis.
Chumash Indians were the early inhabitants of the Ojai Valley.

Cayucos, California

Cayucos
Modern place names with Chumash origins include Cayucos, Malibu, Nipomo, Lompoc, Ojai, Pismo Beach, Point Mugu, Port Hueneme, Piru, Lake Castaic, Saticoy, Simi Valley and Somis.
Prehistorically the local area was inhabited by the Chumash people, who settled the coastal San Luis Obispo area approximately 11,000 to 10,000 BC, including a large village to the south of Cayucos at Morro Creek.

Simi Valley, California

Simi ValleySimi Valley, CASimi
Modern place names with Chumash origins include Cayucos, Malibu, Nipomo, Lompoc, Ojai, Pismo Beach, Point Mugu, Port Hueneme, Piru, Lake Castaic, Saticoy, Simi Valley and Somis.
Simi Valley was once inhabited by the Chumash people, who also settled much of the region from the Salinas Valley to the Santa Monica Mountains, with their presence dating back 10,000–12,000 years.

Santa Cruz Island

Santa CruzSanta Cruz Island, CaliforniaStanton Bones
They also occupied three of the Channel Islands: Santa Cruz, Santa Rosa, and San Miguel; the smaller island of Anacapa was likely inhabited seasonally due to the lack of a consistent water source.
The Chumash people who lived on the island developed a highly complex society dependent on marine harvest, craft specialization and trade with the mainland population.

Pismo Beach, California

Pismo BeachShell BeachPismo Beach, CA
Modern place names with Chumash origins include Cayucos, Malibu, Nipomo, Lompoc, Ojai, Pismo Beach, Point Mugu, Port Hueneme, Piru, Lake Castaic, Saticoy, Simi Valley and Somis.
The tar was a valuable product which the Chumash Indians used to caulk their seagoing canoes, called tomol, which traveled along the coast and out to the Channel Islands.

Saticoy, California

SaticoyCabrillo Village
Modern place names with Chumash origins include Cayucos, Malibu, Nipomo, Lompoc, Ojai, Pismo Beach, Point Mugu, Port Hueneme, Piru, Lake Castaic, Saticoy, Simi Valley and Somis.
Some ancient mealing stones of this prehistoric tribe were found near Saticoy in 1932 and traced back to about 3000 B.C. In about the early 15th century, the Chumash tribe inhabited the area.

San Miguel Island

San MiguelPrince IslandPrince Island (California)
They also occupied three of the Channel Islands: Santa Cruz, Santa Rosa, and San Miguel; the smaller island of Anacapa was likely inhabited seasonally due to the lack of a consistent water source.
Rough seas and risky landings did not daunt the Chumash people.

Point Mugu, California

Point MuguMugu RockNAS Pt. Mugu
Modern place names with Chumash origins include Cayucos, Malibu, Nipomo, Lompoc, Ojai, Pismo Beach, Point Mugu, Port Hueneme, Piru, Lake Castaic, Saticoy, Simi Valley and Somis.
The name is believed to be derived from the Chumash Indian term "Muwu", meaning "beach", which was first mentioned by Cabrillo in his journals in 1542.

Tomol

boatssmall watercraftTomolo'o
This feat, difficult even for today’s technology, was made possible by the tomol plank canoe.
Tomols are plank-built boats, historically and currently used by the Chumash and Tongva Native Americans in the Santa Barbara and Los Angeles area.

Ventureño language

VentureñoVentureño Chumashveo
Especially well documented are the Barbareño, Ineseño, and Ventureño dialects.
Ventureño is a member of the extinct Chumashan languages, a group of Native American languages previously spoken by the Chumash people along the coastal areas of Southern California from as far north as San Luis Obispo to as far south as Malibu.

Chumashan languages

ChumashChumashanChumash language
Several related languages under the name "Chumash" (from čʰumaš, meaning "Santa Cruz Islander") were spoken.
Chumashan (meaning "Santa Cruz Islander") is a family of languages that were spoken on the southern California coast by Native American Chumash people, from the Coastal plains and valleys of San Luis Obispo to Malibu, neighboring inland and Transverse Ranges valleys and canyons east to bordering the San Joaquin Valley, to three adjacent Channel Islands: San Miguel, Santa Rosa, and Santa Cruz.

Tejon Indian Tribe of California

Tejon Indian TribeTejonTejon Chumash
One Chumash band, the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation is a federally recognized tribe, and other Chumash people are enrolled in the federally-recognized Tejon Indian Tribe of California.
The Tejon Indian Tribe of California is a federally recognized tribe of Kitanemuk, Yokuts, and Chumash indigenous people of California.

Tongva

Tongva peopleGabrielinoGabrieleño
They are one of the relatively few New World peoples who regularly navigated the ocean (another was the Tongva, a neighboring tribe to the south).
Along with the neighboring Chumash, the Tongva were the most powerful indigenous people to inhabit Southern California.

John Peabody Harrington

John P. HarringtonJ. P. HarringtonHarrington
Few native speakers remain, although the dialects are well documented in the unpublished fieldnotes of linguist John Peabody Harrington.
For three years, he devoted his spare time to an intense examination of the few surviving Chumash people.

Macoma nasuta

bent-nosed clam
Foods historically consumed by the Chumash include several marine species, such as black abalone, the Pacific littleneck clam, red abalone, the bent-nosed clam, ostrea lurida oysters, angular unicorn snails, and the butternut clam.
Archaeological data supports the use of this species by Native Americans such as the Chumash peoples of central California.

Leukoma staminea

littleneck clamlittleneckProtothaca staminea
Foods historically consumed by the Chumash include several marine species, such as black abalone, the Pacific littleneck clam, red abalone, the bent-nosed clam, ostrea lurida oysters, angular unicorn snails, and the butternut clam.
This species of mollusc was exploited by early humans in North America; for example, the Chumash peoples of Central California harvested these clams in Morro Bay approximately 1,000 years ago, and the distinctive shells form middens near their settlements.

Hunter-gatherer

hunter-gatherershunting and gatheringhunter gatherer
The Chumash were hunter-gatherers and were adept at fishing at the time of Spanish colonization.
One group, the Chumash, had the highest recorded population density of any known hunter and gatherer society with an estimated 21.6 persons per square mile.