Church (building)

churchchurcheschurch buildingChapelchurch buildingsbuildingecclesiasticalparish churchabbey churchChristian church
A church building or church house, often simply called a church, is a building used for Christian religious activities, particularly for Christian worship services.wikipedia
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Aisle

aislesside aisleaisled
When viewed from plan view the vertical beam of the cross is represented by the center aisle and seating while the horizontal beam and junction of the cross is formed by the bema and altar.
Aisles can be seen in airplanes, certain types of buildings, such as churches, cathedrals, synagogues, meeting halls, parliaments and legislatures, courtrooms, theatres, and in certain types of passenger vehicles.

Altar

high altarHoly Tablealtars
When viewed from plan view the vertical beam of the cross is represented by the center aisle and seating while the horizontal beam and junction of the cross is formed by the bema and altar.
Altars are found at shrines, temples, churches and other places of worship.

Cathedral

cathedralscathedral churchproto-cathedral
A cathedral is a church building, usually Roman Catholic, Protestant (including Anglican), Eastern Orthodox, or Oriental Orthodox, housing a cathedra, the formal name for the seat or throne of a presiding bishop.
A cathedral is a church that contains the cathedra of a bishop, thus serving as the central church of a diocese, conference, or episcopate.

Church

Church (disambiguation)c'''hurchchurch (community)
In standard Greek usage, the older word "ecclesia" (ἐκκλησία, ekklesía, literally "assembly", "congregation", or the place where such a gathering occurs) was retained to signify both a specific edifice of Christian worship (a "church"), and the overall community of the faithful (the "Church").

Cathedra

seatEpiscopal seatbishop's throne
A cathedral is a church building, usually Roman Catholic, Protestant (including Anglican), Eastern Orthodox, or Oriental Orthodox, housing a cathedra, the formal name for the seat or throne of a presiding bishop.
A church into which a bishop's official cathedra is installed is called a cathedral.

House church

house churcheshome churchhome churches
The earliest identified Christian church building was a house church founded between 233 and 256.
For the first 300 years of Early Christianity, until Constantine legalized Christianity and churches moved into larger buildings, Christians typically met in homes, if only because intermittent persecution (before the Edict of Milan in 313) did not allow the erection of public church buildings.

Mystery play

mystery playsmiracle playmiracle plays
Besides serving as a place of worship, the cathedral or parish church was frequently employed as a general gathering-place by the communities in which they were located, hosting such events as guild meetings, banquets, mystery plays, and fairs.
Medieval mystery plays focused on the representation of Bible stories in churches as tableaux with accompanying antiphonal song.

Ancient Roman architecture

RomanRoman architecturearchitecture
While the term "Romanesque" refers to the tradition of Roman architecture, the trend in fact appeared throughout Western and Central Europe.
Domes were introduced in a number of Roman building types such as temples, thermae, palaces, mausolea and later also churches.

Eastern Orthodox Church

Eastern OrthodoxOrthodoxOrthodox Church
A cathedral is a church building, usually Roman Catholic, Protestant (including Anglican), Eastern Orthodox, or Oriental Orthodox, housing a cathedra, the formal name for the seat or throne of a presiding bishop.
An iconostasis, also called the templon, is a wall of icons and religious paintings, separating the nave from the sanctuary in a church.

Wool church

churchesoversized churcheswool boom
The Notre-Dame de Paris and Notre-Dame de Reims in France, as well as the San Francesco d’Assisi in Palermo, and the Salisbury Cathedral and Wool Church in England demonstrate the elaborate stylings characteristic of Gothic cathedrals.
A wool church is an English church financed primarily by donations from rich merchants and farmers who had benefitted from the mediaeval wool trade, hoping to ensure a place in heaven due to their largesse.

Palermo

Palermo, SicilyPalermo, ItalyPanormus
The Notre-Dame de Paris and Notre-Dame de Reims in France, as well as the San Francesco d’Assisi in Palermo, and the Salisbury Cathedral and Wool Church in England demonstrate the elaborate stylings characteristic of Gothic cathedrals.
Numerous tourists are attracted to the city for its good Mediterranean weather, its renowned gastronomy and restaurants, its Romanesque, Gothic, Baroque and Art Nouveau churches, palaces and buildings, and its nightlife and music.

Religion

religiousreligionsreligious beliefs
The term is often used by Christians to refer to the physical buildings where they worship, but it is sometimes used (by analogy) to refer to buildings of other religions.
Sociological classifications of religious movements suggest that within any given religious group, a community can resemble various types of structures, including churches, denominations, sects, cults, and institutions.

Basilica

basilicasminor basilicabasilican
The basilica was not the most popular type of church anymore, but instead hall churches were built.
By extension the name was applied to Christian churches which adopted the same basic plan and it continues to be used as an architectural term to describe such buildings, which form the majority of church buildings in Western Christianity, though the basilican building plan became less dominant in new buildings from the later 20th century.

Groin vault

cross vaultcross-vaultgroin-vaulted
In the early romanesque era, coffering on the ceiling was fashionable, while later in the same era, groined vault gained popularity.
The aspirations of church building reached its zenith then, and the groin vault was pursued aggressively for its ability to create strength, without massive buttress formations; in addition, it provided the church architects a remedy for the dim illumination inherent in the barrel vault design, since the barrel vault had to minimise fenestration to retain adequate strength.

Monastery

monasteriesmonasticmonastic community
A conventual church (or monastery church, minster, katholikon) is the main church building in a Christian monastery or abbey.
A monastery generally includes a place reserved for prayer which may be a chapel, church, or temple, and may also serve as an oratory, or in the case of communities anything from a single building housing only one senior and two or three junior monks or nuns, to vast complexes and estates housing tens or hundreds.

Notre-Dame de Paris

Notre Dame de ParisNotre DameNotre Dame Cathedral
The Notre-Dame de Paris and Notre-Dame de Reims in France, as well as the San Francesco d’Assisi in Palermo, and the Salisbury Cathedral and Wool Church in England demonstrate the elaborate stylings characteristic of Gothic cathedrals.
During that anniversary year, on 21 May 2013, Dominique Venner, a historian and white nationalist, placed a letter on the Church altar and shot himself, dying instantly.

Iconostasis

iconostasesicon screeniconostas
In Eastern Christianity an iconostasis (plural: iconostases) is a wall of icons and religious paintings, separating the nave from the sanctuary in a church.

Church architecture

churchecclesiastical architecturechurches
In traditional Christian architecture, a church interior is often structured in the shape of a Christian cross.
Church architecture refers to the architecture of buildings of Christian churches.

St. Peter's Basilica

Saint Peter's BasilicaSt Peter's BasilicaSt. Peter
The Papal Basilica of St. Peter in the Vatican (Basilica Papale di San Pietro in Vaticano), or simply St. Peter's Basilica (Basilica Sancti Petri), is a church built in the Renaissance style located in Vatican City, the papal enclave which is within the city of Rome.

List of cathedrals in the United States

Saint Sophia Cathedral, Los Angeles
This is a list of cathedrals in the United States, including both actual cathedrals (seats of bishops in episcopal denominations, such as Roman Catholicism and Anglicanism) and a few prominent churches from non-episcopal denominations that have the word "cathedral" in their names.

List of largest church buildings

List of largest church buildings in the worldin the world by arealargest church in the world
A church can be measured by various criteria in order to determine its size.

List of oldest church buildings

Oldest churches in the worldList of the oldest churches in the worldList of the oldest churches
This article lists some but by no means all of the oldest known church buildings in the world.

Lists of cathedrals

List of cathedralsList of English cathedralsCathedrals
This is a list of cathedrals by country, including both actual cathedrals (seats of bishops in episcopal denominations, such as Catholicism, Anglicanism, and Orthodoxy) and a few prominent churches from non-episcopal denominations commonly referred to as "cathedral", usually having formerly acquired that status.

Place of worship

places of worshiphouses of worshiphouse of worship
Temples, churches, synagogues and mosques are examples of structures created for worship.

Stave church

stave churcheswooden churchStave-church
A stave church is a medieval wooden Christian church building once common in north-western Europe.